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Rebecca

What Do You Feel Is The Most Difficult Aspect Of Writing?

What do you feel is the most difficult aspect of writing?  

  1. 1. What do you feel is the most difficult aspect of writing?

    • Finding an idea that inspires you
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    • Finding the time to write
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    • Experiencing writer's block
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    • Spelling and grammar
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    • Keeping characters, "in character"
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    • Maintaining a steady plotline
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    • Proofreading and editing
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    • Getting published
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    • Marketing your work
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    • Other
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What do you feel is the most difficult aspect of writing? What are the biggest challenges you face when writing, and how do you handle them?

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Other......and all of the above (well, so far, haven't started the publishing bit yet). Seriously, making myself write or edit or just stay off the internet.

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marketing, definitely. Getting published in today's technology crazy world is a piece of cake. Well, maybe several pieces if you self-publish... writer, editor, copy editor, formatting, cover design, proofing, uploading, holding your breath. marketing, learning.... but when you hold your creation in your hands, there is no feeling like it.

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I agree with Solar. Getting published is difficult unless you choose self-publishing. And since there is that option, I chose to check marketing. I HATE marketing! It is very difficult for me, probably due to my personality. {{sigh}}

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I think the hardest part of writing is the patience required, especially if you decide to go the traditional route. First you have to have patience to perfect your writing. It may seem great to you, but publishable novels and unpublishable novels sometimes only have a fractional difference in quality. It's hard to have the patience to get to the place where you have accomplished publishable quality. Then there's the patience required to write more than one book while your waiting. A friend of mine, Mary Connely, wrote 7 novels while waiting for a contract. After she was published, they wanted everything she had written. The average published writer writes 3-7 manuscripts before being traditionally published. Then there's the patience of working to get the right agent - a very slow process. Then you have to wait until the agent finds the right publisher. Many give up before that happens and settle for self-publishing or give up on writing. But I believe those who wait, will reap the reward.

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Grammar is definitely my biggest drawback in writing. I write the way I talk - in my local dialect,

 

 

When I proof read my own writing I understand what it is saying, unfortunately no one else can! lol

 

 

But I keep on writing anyway!

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What I write is only under the annointing of the Holy Spirit. I know it sounds strange, but if the annointing isn't there I don't write. I have over 50 psalms written and am in the process of learning how to get these published. God gave me the name of the book years ago, and now it is time to move forward. This to me is the hard part.

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The hardest part for me (so far) is actually getting the manuscript done. I guess that includes not having the time to devote, and also not having a good layout and plot flow.

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I'm trying to market my work at the moment, having finally had a novel come out in paperback. I've decided marketing is definitely the hardest part so far.

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My health has been a challenge and I just don't get things done like I used to. I sleep a lot, I am distracted by pain a lot, I waste a lot of time on none essentals.

 

 

Annette

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Currently, my greatest struggle is generating content that can glorify God while also being tasteful. It is easy to write stories of salvation, forgiveness, and such, but it is incredibly difficult to write in a way that even non-believers will be drawn to your writing, and (hopefully) drawn to the Lord through it. Attending a secular university doesn't help, either. Most of my professors want us to read work that is simply wicked, focusing on sex, selfishness, and things that would dishonor Christ. It's hard to write anything else when that is all the fiction you are able to read.

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Perfectionism. That's my biggest challenge when writing. Or maybe it's bad writing that needs to be perfected. Well, it can't really be perfected by me because I'm not perfect, no matter how hard or how long I try. So, maybe it's close-enough-to-perfect that I'm trying to accomplish. No, that's not quite it, either. Maybe it's competence that I'm trying to reach. No, needs to be better than just competent. Far enough above competent that it's acceptable and then some? Argh. See what I mean?

 

 

And even when I get a passage to good-enough-to-be-acceptable-and-then-some (no, that's still not the right way to put it) I come back later and find that it's really so far from right. Then I try again to bring it to whatever standard it should meet, only to come back and find again that it needs more work... And then I realize that parts that I've spent so much time on need to be chopped in order for the whole piece to be better.

 

 

Or maybe my biggest challenge when writing is something else. Maybe it's indecisiveness. ;)

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I find that any of these aspects can be difficult, so it can depend on which one I'm currently focusing on.

 

 

At present (and by far) it's marketing.

 

 

Being self-published brings an extra emphasis on this. I find that my work is drowning in a sea of other books. On Amazon alone, there are 1.6 million eBooks (and far more print books), which as of late is growing at a rate of 50K per month. How to get noticed in this situation is a perplexing question for me. I'm not very good at promoting myself to begin with.

 

 

Add to this that I want to market in an ethical manner, when it seems numerous other authors are quick to embrace unscrupulous methods. To me, this makes it even more discouraging.

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I freeze when it comes to editing. I know it's important, but the inner critic becomes very demanding and I end up wasting a lot of time. I'm not looking forward to marketing either but I'm not there yet.

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For sure, marketing is my biggest bane. Especially now, when I'm denied access to Facebook by a new Wi-Fi system that can't tell the difference between corporate accounts and resident accounts. They keep saying IT is working on it, but I'm champing at the bit because social networks like Facebook are the easiest way to market my books and my blog. So far I haven't seen a great reduction of hits per week on my blog, but I fear it could dwindle if people lose interest and I can't announce each article as it's posted.

 

 

The other issue I deal with is health, or lack thereof. Sometimes I procrastinate, sometimes pain keeps me from being as creative as I should be, and stories tend to take longer to write. I am now working on an idea Nora suggested two years ago, about a mystery writer who discovers her fictional crimes are becoming real. I forgot Nora's last name, but I'm using her first name for my MC, Nora Lefbridge. Its title has evolved until I settled on one I liked: Skyfire.

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For sure, marketing is my biggest bane. Especially now, when I'm denied access to Facebook by a new Wi-Fi system that can't tell the difference between corporate accounts and resident accounts. They keep saying IT is working on it, but I'm champing at the bit because social networks like Facebook are the easiest way to market my books and my blog. So far I haven't seen a great reduction of hits per week on my blog, but I fear it could dwindle if people lose interest and I can't announce each article as it's posted.

 

 

The other issue I deal with is health, or lack thereof. Sometimes I procrastinate, sometimes pain keeps me from being as creative as I should be, and stories tend to take longer to write. I am now working on an idea Nora suggested two years ago, about a mystery writer who discovers her fictional crimes are becoming real. I forgot Nora's last name, but I'm using her first name for my MC, Nora Lefbridge. Its title has evolved until I settled on one I liked: Skyfire.

 

Well, I'm honored. Just a side note on that, I recently saw a rerun of NCIS that had a similar premise.

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I find it interesting that finding time to write and marketing are tied on this survey.

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Ah, so you're still around. I thought you'd be interested in my update. I'm sure the premise has been done lots of times, in different ways. To paraphrase a line from Ecclesiastes, "There are no new plots under the sun."

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Descriptions. Always get stuck with trying to describe what I see in my head.

 

 

Dialogue seems to come easily, but trying to set the scene, or mood, or a particular quirk or physical trait never seems to come out just right.

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