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A 21st Century sophisticate reaches the food counter of her favorite take-out “restaurant”, Le hambourgeoise, and belts out, “Where’s the Plant-based?!”

 

After I just saw an ad for plant-based chorizo, perhaps the above scenario is not so farfetched!

 

I rely on God’s covenant with Noah. 😀. Here, referring to the license to eat meat rather than the rainbow’s promise to be protected from the watered destruction of vegetation and animals.

 

 

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I'll be thankful both for the foods that are plant-based, and those that are not. I've cooked a number of vegetarian recipes, and while some are fairly good, few can't be improved with the addition of a little meat & cheese. If we go light & easy with 'em, though, it can be a fine way to shed a few extra pounds, which I occasionally find myself doing. 

 

While American vegetarian recipes tend to try to simulate the effect of meat, and do so poorly, a lot of recipes from Western India take veggies as they are, and make them spectacular. (It doesn't hurt to be somewhat acclimated to spicy foods...) They don't try to make the vegetables into something they're not, and have probably had a few thousand more years of practice to get their recipes right. It also doesn't hurt that the recipes were developed in a land where even a lot of the weeds are remarkably tasty, but I'm impressed, still.

 

While folks in Biblical times enjoyed meat, most enjoyed it rarely, largely 'cuz it was very expensive, and most people were third-world-poor. They largely got their protein from chickpeas, lentils, and flatbreads made from barley (wheat was for the wealthy.) Their largest non-plant-based sources of protein were grasshoppers and locusts, which, once the legs were removed, could be toasted, ground up, and used to flavor their higher-quality bread loaves...

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Hi Wes B,

   I have to say the face and the writing.... I would have never put together. Being a Hebrew I have to disagree with your historical account. Even the very poor had access to meat in ancient times due to provision for the poor. It was a Hebrew custom. And if you lived in Jerusalem at the time of Christ.... well a lot of animal sacrifice going on. Just sayin. 
   With things being as they are nowadays, I do a lot of web surfing. I noticed a strange uptick in the plant- based food stuff. Seems to be linked to some other stuff. 
   Well interesting take on it all from an unassuming looking man . Thanks for sharing.

 

Shulammite.

 

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1 hour ago, suspensewriter said:

Well, but there's nothing wrong with eating plant based, either.

  Nope there's not. But some think everyone should be on board with it. Ya know those food prophets ?  Lol! I even hear how people in 1st world countries will start eating bugs as a source of protein from the carbon footprint prophets. Even lab grown meat being pushed by some.

   To each his own I say. If you don't eat meat -don't. If you like meat- eat! I just can't stand the type who cling to dietary preferences like a religion and start barking their personal opinions at others like veggie prophets . Lol! 

 

Shulammite.

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2 hours ago, Ragamuffin_John said:

A 21st Century sophisticate reaches the food counter of her favorite take-out “restaurant”, Le hambourgeoise, and belts out, “Where’s the Plant-based?!”

 

After I just saw an ad for plant-based chorizo, perhaps the above scenario is not so farfetched!

 

I rely on God’s covenant with Noah. 😀. Here, referring to the license to eat meat rather than the rainbow’s promise to be protected from the watered destruction of vegetation and animals.

 

 

   No leading there. Sophiticated? Why? Twenty first century??? Wait in the truck! I love it! Ya know why? The Mean Green Machines want to project a sophistication about not eating meat. You eat meat and you're backwards. I agree with your comment on relying on God's covenant. But there is a watered down destruction flooding the world today .  It's called Elitism. It leads to boredism because you have too much money and too much stuff. So you begin rearranging everyones else's stuff and lives. Enjoyed the little read.

 

Shulammite.

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23 minutes ago, Shulammite said:

Even the very poor had access to meat in ancient times due to provision for the poor. It was a Hebrew custom. And if you lived in Jerusalem at the time of Christ.... well a lot of animal sacrifice going on. Just sayin.

 

Thanks for your comments. I'll note that I have no disagreement with what you say, but then it doesn't contradict anything I've said, so I'm not sure your "disagreement" is possible.

 

I did say they enjoyed meat rarely. Theirs was a world of scarcity though, and except at festival times, there just wasn't all that much meat available. At Passover-time, a lot of lambs were made available at an affordable price, and everyone who participated ate meat. 

 

You may find that the Jerusalem sacrifices did not produce meat available to the general public, though. That meat either by law could be eaten only by the priests (there was a particular nutritional deficiency prevalent among them, that came from a diet consisting almost entirely of meat...) or in the case of a thing like a Fellowship Offering, the meat was shared between the priest and the one making the offering.

 

Your comment on meat from sacrifices does completely apply in gentile cities, though. Mass sacrifices to pagan deities during certain festival times produced a glut of available meat, for a short time, and at those spot times it was affordable to everyone. The Apostle Paul had to deal with various Christians' concerns on this, in his comments on eating meat sacrificed to idols, because some Christians were worried that they were participating in pagan worship by consuming it.

 

If you can find any reference from a credible source on sacrificial meat offered to the public in Jerusalem though, I would be very glad to see it. I'm always learning new things...

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1 hour ago, William D'Andrea said:

     Eeew!  Yuck!  Gross me out the door!

 

I'm not gonna say that I find their cuisine especially appetizing; I'm just sayin' that their world was very different from ours. Vast numbers of the people back then struggled to produce enough even to feed their families. Wheat cost some four times as much as barley, so barley bread, it was. You know why there's no barley bread at the supermarket? It's wretched stuff.

 

So they had their own ways of making things tastier, but when you're that poor, you give new meaning to the phrase, "eat local." If it had to be transported any distance, it probably wasn't an option.

 

Now, they didn't write cookbooks back then, but if you go to a modern middle-eastern restaurant or festival, you'll probably be able to find flat breads coated with za'atar, which is an amazing herb mix that people back in the day probably knew something about. While it's very tasty, and they'd also have had things like onions and garlic to add in, it would get very old if eaten every day.

 

But they ate a lot of bread, especially the yucky barley, that grew so much faster and so much more abundantly than the wheat. So they used what they had available. And Leviticus 11:22 does specifically mention locusts and grasshoppers as acceptable food, so it was just something they knew of as a staple food.

 

And no, I can't actually imagine people who'd be glad to eat grasshoppers but would turn their noses up at bacon, either. But there they are...

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1 hour ago, Wes B said:

 

Thanks for your comments. I'll note that I have no disagreement with what you say, but then it doesn't contradict anything I've said, so I'm not sure your "disagreement" is possible.

 

I did say they enjoyed meat rarely. Theirs was a world of scarcity though, and except at festival times, there just wasn't all that much meat available. At Passover-time, a lot of lambs were made available at an affordable price, and everyone who participated ate meat. 

 

You may find that the Jerusalem sacrifices did not produce meat available to the general public, though. That meat either by law could be eaten only by the priests (there was a particular nutritional deficiency prevalent among them, that came from a diet consisting almost entirely of meat...) or in the case of a thing like a Fellowship Offering, the meat was shared between the priest and the one making the offering.

 

Your comment on meat from sacrifices does completely apply in gentile cities, though. Mass sacrifices to pagan deities during certain festival times produced a glut of available meat, for a short time, and at those spot times it was affordable to everyone. The Apostle Paul had to deal with various Christians' concerns on this, in his comments on eating meat sacrificed to idols, because some Christians were worried that they were participating in pagan worship by consuming it.

 

If you can find any reference from a credible source on sacrificial meat offered to the public in Jerusalem though, I would be very glad to see it. I'm always learning new things...

   Not what I was saying. I am saying meat was not as scarce as many are lead to believe. But yes the poor have always been with us. As for your point of sacrificing to idols , I wasn't really focused on that. Yes that was a period before Christianity was instituted.  For Jews ,no need after , for the  in Christ to sacrifice anything. And actually the spiritual part wasn't my point in bringing up sacrifice as much as the abundance of meat was. But thanks for expounding.

  There were many shepherds among the peoples and shepherds weren't rich , (those who owned their own flocks that is) but had meat. Doves  too and the sort were eaten etc.. Those who could not get , were mainly physically limited . But the poor had other ways besides the meat markets to get food -is my point.

   I feel many things today are bias when a personal narrative is the objective.  Meat was eaten more than people think. In my opinion slights toward meat eating is a passive aggressive approach . Like honestly who cares if people do or don't want to eat meat anyways? Those who do , well, need to go get lives and butt out of everyone else's.

   Point is , this topic has become more prevalent today with the 2020 " Vision" agenda that has been unfolding. Food scarcity and alternative options is the narrative . That in first world countries , which is odd. I notice an  "ancients were so limited and rudimentary " approach as a leaping point. As though they couldn't find meat. Lol! All the meat wasn't at the temple is my point.

  The ancients, poor or not ,could survive better here , today if some unfortunate event occurred, than people in the now.  Many were skilled hunters. The wilderness of the grocery store is hardly wrought with perils. Lol!

 

Shulammite.

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21 minutes ago, Shulammite said:

   Not what I was saying. I am saying meat was not as scarce as many are lead to believe. But yes the poor have always been with us. As for your point of sacrificing to idols , I wasn't really focused on that. Yes that was a period before Christianity was instituted.  For Jews ,no need after , for the  in Christ to sacrifice anything. And actually the spiritual part wasn't my point in bringing up sacrifice as much as the abundance of meat was. But thanks for expounding.

  There were many shepherds among the peoples and shepherds weren't rich , (those who owned their own flocks that is) but had meat. Doves  too and the sort were eaten etc.. Those who could not get , were mainly physically limited . But the poor had other ways besides the meat markets to get food -is my point.

   I feel many things today are bias when a personal narrative is the objective.  Meat was eaten more than people think. In my opinion slights toward meat eating is a passive aggressive approach . Like honestly who cares if people do or don't want to eat meat anyways? Those who do , well, need to go get lives and butt out of everyone else's.

   Point is , this topic has become more prevalent today with the 2020 " Vision" agenda that has been unfolding. Food scarcity and alternative options is the narrative . That in first world countries , which is odd. I notice an  "ancients were so limited and rudimentary " approach as a leaping point. As though they couldn't find meat. Lol! All the meat wasn't at the temple is my point.

  The ancients, poor or not ,could survive better here , today if some unfortunate event occurred, than people in the now.  Many were skilled hunters. The wilderness of the grocery store is hardly wrought with perils. Lol!

 

Shulammite.

Sorry for the hiccup fourth sentence in. Meant ( No need for the Jews in Christ to sacrifice anything after). On my phone. Just bored .

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My husband and I have to eat gluten-free foods; mainly because he has celiac disease. In many ways it has been a blessing because it eliminates foods that are harmful to the body and brain. I have had to be very creative in preparing foods but that also has been a blessing. The good Lord provides wondrous creativity whenever and wherever necessary.

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5 minutes ago, Toni Star said:

My husband and I have to eat gluten-free foods; mainly because he has celiac disease. In many ways it has been a blessing because it eliminates foods that are harmful to the body and brain. I have had to be very creative in preparing foods but that also has been a blessing. The good Lord provides wondrous creativity whenever and wherever necessary.

Harmful to the body and the brain? How so? You do know every person on earth , before technology to remove gluten came along , ate something with gluten? Every nation's bread for instance - wheat based? Do you think that something which weakened the genetics of people may be the culprit concerning celiac disease? And maybe only people with a genetic issues have their brains adversely affected by gluten? 

 

Thanks,

Shulammite.

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Good points, Shulamite! What I meant to say is that eating gluten-free foods work well for us. Of course, this wouldn't apply to everyone--just those whose genetics cannot tolerate gluten. Certain foods do affect the brain negatively but of course, choosing to eat certain foods are a choice we all make every day.

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22 hours ago, Shulammite said:

Hi Wes B,

   I have to say the face and the writing.... I would have never put together. Being a Hebrew I have to disagree with your historical account. Even the very poor had access to meat in ancient times due to provision for the poor. It was a Hebrew custom. And if you lived in Jerusalem at the time of Christ.... well a lot of animal sacrifice going on. Just sayin. 
   With things being as they are nowadays, I do a lot of web surfing. I noticed a strange uptick in the plant- based food stuff. Seems to be linked to some other stuff. 
   Well interesting take on it all from an unassuming looking man . Thanks for sharing.

 

Shulammite.

 

I like what Abraham arranged, to feed the three who approached his test:   bread, lamb, milk, butter…

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22 hours ago, Shulammite said:

  Nope there's not. But some think everyone should be on board with it. Ya know those food prophets ?  Lol! I even hear how people in 1st world countries will start eating bugs as a source of protein from the carbon footprint prophets. Even lab grown meat being pushed by some.

   To each his own I say. If you don't eat meat -don't. If you like meat- eat! I just can't stand the type who cling to dietary preferences like a religion and start barking their personal opinions at others like veggie prophets . Lol! 

 

Shulammite.

Of course, even meat eaters eat bugs.  There was a Denver newspaper article that years ago heralded the re-opening of a major U.S. meat packing facility.  It supplied beef for school lunch programs.  The congratulatory story cited a government official who said that the facility could restart operations, for it had figured out how to process meat with an acceptable level of insect parts per whatever unit of measurement.   Explaining this, I conclude we needn’t flagellate ourselves.  Why, we are consuming a full food chain! 😏

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