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Christian LitRPG


nbunney
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I am trying to gague the interest in Christian LitRPG. I am 35k words into a book right now, I don't really care if it is published or not, I use the writing for relaxation time. On the other hand I have published poetry before and my friends are liking the story and I am willing to put the time in to edit it if people think that there is a market. Let me know what you think.

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It would certainly be unique.  I doubt anyone has attempted to take LitRPG in a Christian direction.  You'd likely be breaking into a new market, and there might indeed be interest there.  I suspect the interest in it would depend on the quality of the work.  It also might be more appealing to young people, so your target audience might be teenagers looking for an entertaining LitRPG with a solid moral base.

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Lit RPG is where the characters live inside a game world, kind of like the Matrix, but with stat points, inventory, hit points, all of that sort of stuff. As a Genre it is really taking off and I have read a lot recently. Much of it is books that I just set down after 50 pages because they are garbage but there are some good ones out there. I particularly like Shade Slinger

 

Check out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LitRPG

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5 hours ago, nbunney said:

I attend a church that is full of homeschool kids, I am actually writing it with them in mind. Keeping it clean (minimal gore, no language). LM I will drop in at Meet and Greet and introduce myself.

 

From what I hear, homeschoolers are hungry for this kind of stuff.  Anything to get their kids reading without some of the more questionable literature that has been creeping into the schools these days.  You know, like a backed-up toilet...

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Guest Spaulding

It's only been a couple of years since I was converted. That is I went from "You can't make a story out of an RPG" to "Right on, dude." (Is my age showing? 🤭)

 

The one part of RPG is the reason I wish there was another choice in writing Lit RPG though. Way too much running around mazes for loot and killing critters or NPCs to get it. How do you deal with gratuitous death?

 

As for homeschooled Christian kids? What age level will your audience be? (I couldn't, in good conscious, write it for primary school aged kids.)

 

But, one of my favorite series is Lit RPG with a teddy bear golem as protagonist, so I'm not against it, as much as wondering how do you deal with the two problems I presented.

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So age range would be high school for sure. There is violence but it is possible to tone some of that down as it is a game and not real life. So, if i wanted to, I could just made things that die disappear. Then the only violence is the hitpoints of damage that they take. On the other hand, what homeschool did has not read LotR with their parents blessing. Lots of violence in there for sure.

 

If you like LitRPG check out Shadeslinger that I link above. Not at all Christian but fairly clean and very well written. The author also has a Discord server and has directly answered many of my questions. Nice guy.

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Guest Spaulding
15 minutes ago, nbunney said:

So age range would be high school for sure. There is violence but it is possible to tone some of that down as it is a game and not real life. So, if i wanted to, I could just made things that die disappear. Then the only violence is the hitpoints of damage that they take. On the other hand, what homeschool did has not read LotR with their parents blessing. Lots of violence in there for sure.

Do understand, I've never had kids. (Although I helped raise my brother when Mom died.) As a Christian, I wouldn't let my kids play any RPG that requires killing. (Not saying they wouldn't go behind my back.) There is a difference between LotRs and RPGs in that the deaths were understood as real. (Can't remember names, but the younger brother told Frodo something like "I'm sure he thought his cause was just too.") And they weren't merely to raise stats. Making the bodies disappear never changed it for me. Matter of fact, a bit more hideous because then that person/creature mattered to no one.

 

The one I read was written for adults. I wouldn't want to raise a child on RPGs because it does lessen the value of lives. Hopefully by the time we're adults, we do know how we act in a game is not related to how we act IRL. Matter of fact, that's why I read, and that's why I used to RPG -- to be somewhere and be someone unrelated from real life.

 

(I gave up RPGs because I'm an addict, so would spend too much time in it. Also gave it up to give more time to writing. But I used to play Morrowind/Elder Scrolls IV. And, I'd intentionally look for that invisibility... hmm. Forgot what it was now. But I'd look for it, so I didn't have to keep killing constantly. So don't think I'm against them, just wish someone would make one that doesn't require violence yet wasn't repetitive as Packman, Space Invaders, or flight simulators.)

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On 11/29/2021 at 9:59 AM, Spaulding said:

Making the bodies disappear never changed it for me.

 

Reading this reminded me of a time years ago when I played a fantasy-style video game in which armies of creatures battled each other to a non-gory death.  It seemed innocent enough to me.  My wife didn't care for it, mostly because she felt I spent too much time playing it.  My young son (probably around 8 at the time) was fascinated by it, which didn't make my wife happy.  We argued a bit and compromised by saying he could play a few hours at a time only and he could only play "good" creatures.

 

Skip ahead a few weeks and my son began having nightmares and walking in his sleep.  My wife was furious with me and blamed the game.  We cut out the game and his nightmares ended, but I learned later he was sneaking time in on the game.

 

Skip ahead a few years and my son is well adjusted, still playing those games, and no longer sleep-walking.  

 

Did the violence of the game affect him?  I'm sure it did.  Should we have kept it away from him?  I don't how you do that, especially when the neighbor boy was playing games rated for teenagers (with zombies chasing you and eating you).  I'd have had to lock my son up for 10 years to keep him from running into that sort of thing.  What I did know how to do was to talk to my son and help him to put it all in perspective.  I guess that's being IN the world, but not OF the world.  

 

We still talk today when he wants my point of view.

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Guest Spaulding
4 hours ago, Nick Cole said:

Did the violence of the game affect him?  I'm sure it did.  Should we have kept it away from him?  I don't how you do that, especially when the neighbor boy was playing games rated for teenagers (with zombies chasing you and eating you).  I'd have had to lock my son up for 10 years to keep him from running into that sort of thing.  What I did know how to do was to talk to my son and help him to put it all in perspective.  I guess that's being IN the world, but not OF the world.  

There is always not having the game in your house. I do figure kids will play it at friends houses, however, there are still time constraints, more to that friendship, and parents setting limits there too. If for no other reason than not having the friend stay for dinner and past bedtime. 😆

 

The moment I see a nixhound or a zombie walking down the street is the moment I'll consider games IN the world. (Or it really is time to spend a few months in a sanitarium.)

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