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Evening and Morning.


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Recently, I started reading Genesis and noted something I missed all these years.  Why does the Bible state "And there was evening and there was morning"  Genesis 1:5.  Every day ended with the same statement, placing the evening before the morning.

 

Usually, I would place the evening after the morning.

 

There was always darkness before light.  There is always a morning after the night before.  There is light at the end of a dark tunnel.  There was the evening before the morning.

 

Just a thought.

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The Jewish/Hebrew way of determining the length of day as from one evening to the next.

 

https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/jewish-calendar-solar-and-lunar/

 

Quote

 

The rabbis determined that the new day begins at the moment when the sun sinks below the horizon. Unlike our secular day, in which the daylight hours are framed by night, the Jewish day begins with night and ends with day.

 

This is the reason why all Jewish holidays begin in the evening before the first day of the observance. In fact, according to a Jewish reckoning of time, the evening before the day is indeed the beginning of the new calendar day.

 

 

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Interestin that that link words it, "the rabbis determined..." Because it was God Himself who established it that way. When talking about holidays, He constantly said, "from evening to evening."

 

At any rate, yes, it's cool that it goes from dark to light and quite an interesting thing to ponder 🙂

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They searched the scriptures carefully, so that they could follow God's commandments as thoroughly as they could. So, by determining the exact moment when the sabbath begins, they knew when to cease activity that would otherwise violate the sabbath.

 

F'rexample, scripture says they could not kindle or extinguish a fire on the sabbath, so by extension, any lamp they might use had to be lit before sundown, and had to burn until it extinguished itself. In modern times, among observant Jews, it extends to not using light switches, to unscrewing the lightbulb in the refrigerator before sundown on Friday, and to many other fascinating items we'd never consider (google the term Shabbat Elevator...)

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Remember also that we'll mentally attach the evening-time to the daylight before it, probably because artificial lighting is so cheap and convenient. We extend the daylight well into the nighttime, at the flip of a switch. Back in the day, half of their lives was lived in darkness, and lamp oil was neither cheap nor did it give much illumination. So they slept once the daylight was over (once the day was over...) It was natural to think that, once the sun was gone, so was the day.

 

(Mentioning this, just 'cuz I can...) While we can easily see the metaphor that compares light & darkness to good and evil, it was triply apt among people who at times of the year had to wait in darkness for the light to come, so they could start their days. (In Isa. 21:11-12, the watchman is asked how much nighttime still remains. He presumably has a water clock, dripping away the time somewhere, telling how late it is into the night. Everyone else just makes educated guesses...)

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Given the Hebraic perspective, it’s great that we can say “This is the day that the Lord has made” in the evening!   And, that we should not “let the sun go down on our wrath, bcause a new day has already begun.   Also, how “refreshing” to know that just shortly into our new day, God blows the whistle and bids us to totally give in the bodily and mental rest (“giv[ing] to his beloved in sleep”).  

Edited by Ragamuffin_John
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