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Fictionary storyteller


Shamrock
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Does any one use this software?

 

I ask because there is a 40% BlackFriday deal going at the moment. Normally I would not use it because of the fee and I am not sure there is enough evidence that it does help improve your story. Most of what it offers you can do yourself but I am interested to know what others think.

 

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  • Shamrock changed the title to Fictionary storyteller

I don't know that one, but I'm very cheap...err "frugal." I don't buy unless I know it works for me.

 

I knew Pro Writers Aid worked for me. (I tried it out and others boasted of it.) And six years ago they had a 50% off sale in time for Christmas. It's editing software. If that's what you're looking for, check for their sale. (It seems like an annual event.)

 

But if you tell what that software does, maybe others can tell you the ones they use and recommend.

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Shamrock, I'm sure you've already seen this, but when I searched for Fictionary, this is what I read.

Online writing software that simplifies story editing. In seconds, Fictionary analyzes a manuscript from "Chapter 1" to "The End" and creates powerful visual insights such as the Story Arc. See the story like never before.

 

In seconds? It does the whole book? I'm more than a little dubious. I've used Pro Writers Aid, and it doesn't do the whole book in one shot. A chapter at a time it can handle. But can even AI digest a whole book "in seconds"?

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Thank you @Spaulding & @carolinamtne

 

I have been using PWA for a couple of years and it is very good - but like all software programs you do need to use your common sense.  There are some things it highlights that I ignore but generally I have found it very helpful to get the MS readable and reduce wasted wordage.

 

I have to agree with you @carolinamtne about Fictionary ability to analysis the whole MS as it says. I watched a YT where they showed how it works and it seem very clinical to me. Too text book for my taste but I was interested to see what others thought as I know many people rate Sciveren.

 

I am off the mind to stick to what I know - gut instinct and MS word cut/cop & paste. It works for me.😅

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4 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

But can even AI digest a whole book "in seconds"?

Considering Watson, (a computer), did well against the two best Jeopardy players of all times, (at that time), yes. I can see a program doing that.

 

Then again:

  • It would irritate me to only use it as often as I have a completed manuscript. 
  • Did you know I write like Arthur Conan Doyle or Ian Fleming? After all, an online app told me I did by studying a few paragraphs of the opening to my teddy bear epic. (Same program. A few years apart.) Just think -- Sherlock Holmes, James Bond, and Spaulding side-by-side. Wow.
  • Some stories start with setting the scene or showing a normal life before getting into the action. Some jackrabbit the beginning. If you think of a story arc, exactly how can a computer tell you if the way you started is right for that story?
  • American Idol was created to niche the perfect selling voice/look/personality to sell the most. It has set parameters that most voices/looks/personalities don't want to reach, once more can reach. (Willie Nelson, Aretha Franklin and Bob Dylan wouldn't have passed the audition level, even when they were the right age.) It sounds like Fictionary is set up to maximize profits too. It kills too much of the artistical element of what most writers want.

I can see it working. I can't see why I'd want to spend any money to buy it. I already know I'm not Doyle, Fleming, Nelson, Aretha, or Dylan. I assume I'm not standard issue. (And I'm che... frugal. 😊)

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I do know that the GED testing program requires students to write an essay (computer write) on some subject or other, depending on the test. They have 45 minutes to write it. The essay is then evaluated by some computer program on the correcting end. I can see verifying math questions, even short answer questions. Students usually get their score back within a matter of hours. The GED periodically runs the essay through a human editor to verify the score, which is usually pretty close. However, those essays are not complete novels. "Seconds" just doesn't cut it for me. Even "minutes" would be dubious.

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