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Writing Prompt Wednesday #7


Grey_Skies
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I know, I know, I'm sorry I didn't post anything for the last one.  Especially seeing as I was going to.  And I did start work on a scene, but it just wasn't flowing and I didn't finish it or feel satisfied.  Anyways, here's this week's little prompt, and I promise I do have something to contribute this time. 🙂

 

A hero you'll never meet

Word count limit: 300 

 

Maybe a short, sweet little tribute to someone who, without ever meeting then, you look up to them in some way and for some reason.  I'm looking forward to your answers for this one!

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Alrighty, here's mine!

 

Word count: 112

 

Lionel Barrymore died on November 15th, 1954, so I'll never get the chance to meet him. But I'll always consider him one of my heroes. He was one of the most brilliant actors who ever lived. He gave it his all, and brought his best to every performance. Even when he was in a wheelchair throughout the second half of his career, he kept on going and turned in fantastic performances. It was one of the greatest honors I've ever received to play his role in a streamed radio adaptation of It's a Wonderful Life. Maybe one day, if I ever become a famous actor, I'll erect a statue in his honor.

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299 words!

----------------------------------------

The Greeks were near defeat. King Xerxes of Persia had captured and burned Athens. His men exterminated the famous 300 Spartans who fought to the death at Thermopylae, and now a captured slave named Sinnicus told him of the Greeks' sorry state.

 

Disheartened and fighting among themselves, their fleet was holed-up on the island of Salamis, separated from the mainland by a narrow strait. There was a chance the Athenians might defect to the Persian side. Xerxes snuck his ships into the strait by night. Tomorrow, Xerxes would own Greece.

 

At dawn: a surprise. The Greek ships were lined up to fight. Both sides used swift, oar-powered ships which doubled as battering rams. Normally dried out before battle to shed weight, Xerxes' ships were water-logged from rowing all night. His rowers were tired. In the tight space, Xerxes' vastly larger navy got in each others' way.

 

Xerxes’ watched in helpless fury as his ships were rammed and sunk, one after another. Most of his sailors couldn’t swim. In the end, the Greeks lost 40 ships, the Persians, 200. and Xerxes gave up and fled back home. Interestingly, this is the Xerxes in the book of Esther. A careful eye reveals a several year gap between chapters 1 and 2. This story happened there.

 

That slave informant belonged to a Greek leader. He was his kids' tutor and also a fabulous actor, taking the absurdly dangerous mission of lying to the Persian king's face, and luring him into fighting where their superior size would sink them.

 

Sinnicus received his freedom, full citizenship, and became a successful businessman. Because of him, our world was built on Greek culture, and includes things like democracy. Whenever I eat a dish of moussaka or baklava, I'll silently lift a forkful, in salute to him.

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                                                    A Hero For the Lord?

                                                           (219 Words) 

 

     One morning several years ago, I took my clothes to a local Laundromat. While I was there, an elderly lady lost the lid to her large container of liquid soap. The lid was lying on a shelf, between the backs of two washing machines; too far to reach by hand. I looked around and found a broom. Then I stuck the end of the broomstick inside the lid, lifted it up and returned it to the lady.
     She started telling me how wonderful I was, and I made a joke about it.
     I laughed, "Does this make me a hero?"
     She said, "Oh, but you are a hero."
     Now this was a simple act that took no great faith, courage, wisdom, skill or knowledge of Scripture. All it took, was me just happening to be there, to do a simple act that anyone could do, and it didn’t even cost me one nickel.
     While none of us may be called upon to take part in a Mighty Act of God, we can all be available to do minor acts; everyday things that anyone can do, to bring a blessing from the Lord to someone who needs it. Then someone who needs a simple blessing might call you a hero, and it might not even have cost you a nickel.

Edited by William D'Andrea
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4 hours ago, Wes B said:

299 words!

----------------------------------------

The Greeks were near defeat. King Xerxes of Persia had captured and burned Athens. His men exterminated the famous 300 Spartans who fought to the death at Thermopylae, and now a captured slave named Sinnicus told him of the Greeks' sorry state.

 

Disheartened and fighting among themselves, their fleet was holed-up on the island of Salamis, separated from the mainland by a narrow strait. There was a chance the Athenians might defect to the Persian side. Xerxes snuck his ships into the strait by night. Tomorrow, Xerxes would own Greece.

 

At dawn: a surprise. The Greek ships were lined up to fight. Both sides used swift, oar-powered ships which doubled as battering rams. Normally dried out before battle to shed weight, Xerxes' ships were water-logged from rowing all night. His rowers were tired. In the tight space, Xerxes' vastly larger navy got in each others' way.

 

Xerxes’ watched in helpless fury as his ships were rammed and sunk, one after another. Most of his sailors couldn’t swim. In the end, the Greeks lost 40 ships, the Persians, 200. and Xerxes gave up and fled back home. Interestingly, this is the Xerxes in the book of Esther. A careful eye reveals a several year gap between chapters 1 and 2. This story happened there.

 

That slave informant belonged to a Greek leader. He was his kids' tutor and also a fabulous actor, taking the absurdly dangerous mission of lying to the Persian king's face, and luring him into fighting where their superior size would sink them.

 

Sinnicus received his freedom, full citizenship, and became a successful businessman. Because of him, our world was built on Greek culture, and includes things like democracy. Whenever I eat a dish of moussaka or baklava, I'll silently lift a forkful, in salute to him.

Very cool!  I've never heard of Sinnicus before; always great to learn something new! 😁

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3 hours ago, William D'Andrea said:

                                                    A Hero For the Lord?

                                                           (219 Words) 

 

     One morning several years ago, I took my clothes to a local Laundromat. While I was there, an elderly lady lost the lid to her large container of liquid soap. The lid was lying on a shelf, between the backs of two washing machines; too far to reach by hand. I looked around and found a broom. Then I stuck the end of the broomstick inside the lid, lifted it up and returned it to the lady.
     She started telling me how wonderful I was, and I made a joke about it.
     I laughed, "Does this make me a hero?"
     She said, "Oh, but you are a hero."
     Now this was a simple act that took no great faith, courage, wisdom, skill or knowledge of Scripture. All it took, was me just happening to be there, to do a simple act that anyone could do, and it didn’t even cost me one nickel.
     While none of us may be called upon to take part in a Mighty Act of God, we can all be available to do minor acts; everyday things that anyone can do, to bring a blessing from the Lord to someone who needs it. Then someone who needs a simple blessing might call you a hero, and it might not even have cost you a nickel.

Nice, thanks for sharing!  I'm assuming this is a true story?

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13 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

Nice, thanks for sharing!  I'm assuming this is a true story?

    Thank you.  Yes it is true, and only part of a larger article.   The entire article is also posted here on christianwriters.com, in the Reading Room, where it's titled "The Minor Works of God".  It's at the top of the list.  I think you know how to get there from here.

    Thank you again. 

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I will never meet this hero; for she has been gone many years. but over 70 years ago--giving away my age--she saved me and my sister's life. A family member gave both of us each a large gumball--that's what we called them back then. We started chewing on them but at the same time, we gagged and couldn't breathe. At that moment in time, we were also talking with a neighbor across the street.

She pulled each of us up by one leg and shook us until the gum came out. It sounds funny now to relate this to you, but if it weren't for her being there at that particular time, we would have died. Our parents were across the street from her; for she lived diagonally across from where our grandmother lived. She was a trusted neighbor; so probably there was no need to be worried about us.

Anyway, she was and is my hero. My sister and I thank God for her!

Edited by Toni Star
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14 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

Very cool!  I've never heard of Sinnicus before; always great to learn something new! 😁

 

Thanks. I don't think too many people have heard of Sicinnus (my deepest apology... the typo is mine...  writing to a word limit seems to make me write quickly, as well...), making him a perfect subject when this prompt is answered by a history-nerd, like myself. The fact that he vaguely brushes against Biblical background, makes him doubly appropriate, for a Bible-nerd, as well.

 

 

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2 hours ago, William D'Andrea said:

    Thank you.  Yes it is true, and only part of a larger article.   The entire article is also posted here on christianwriters.com, in the Reading Room, where it's titled "The Minor Works of God".  It's at the top of the list.  I think you know how to get there from here.

    Thank you again. 

I just read the whole article!  Very cool, thanks for directing me over to it.  You make some really good points.  Christians should definitely make more of an effort to reach out and help others.  We are then showing God's love through us.

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1 hour ago, Toni Star said:

I will never meet this hero; for she has been gone many years. but over 70 years ago--giving away my age--she saved me and my sister's life. A family member gave both of us each a large gumball--that's what we called them back then. We started chewing on them but at the same time, we gagged and couldn't breathe. At that moment in time, we were also talking with a neighbor across the street.

She pulled each of us up by one leg and shook us until the gum came out. It sounds funny now to relate this to you, but if it weren't for her being there at that particular time, we would have died. Our parents were across the street from her; for she lived diagonally across from where our grandmother lived. She was a trusted neighbor; so probably there was no need to be worried about us.

Anyway, she was and is my hero. My sister and I thank God for her!

Wow, interesting personal story!  Thank you for contributing this piece!

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