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A List for Spelling and Grammar


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The only way I got A's on my vocabulary quiz each week is by memorizing the words for the week. And the only way I aced grammar tests was the same way. There were only so many vocabulary and grammar tests, and that was so long ago, I don't necessarily remember how to spell words or understand grammar now. But, when I was a teenager, my friend's dad taught me my first Monomeric, (a device to remember something.)

 

Privilege. It's a privilege to have two eyes and a leg. (There are two I's and the word "leg" in the spelling.)

 

I've never forgotten how to spell that word since.

 

And I know how to enclose dialogue properly from something Mom taught me. "Whatever the person says goes in the quotes." (Now had I only remembered asking about punctuation marks to go with the quotes, when what they said was in the middle of a sentence. 😳)

 

Two others I know:

The different between passed and past. If you can change the word to "beyond," then it is past. If you can't, it's passed. (I beyond my quiz versus I passed my quiz.)

 

Dialog versus dialogue. In America, there is no difference, but since it is different in other languages, (dialog is computer language), I remember it, (if I remember it), with, "I don't get to shorten the word, just because I'm lazy."

 

I was thinking everyone has their own cheat sheets. How about we share what we know, and have one long cheat sheet?

 

 

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Honestly, despite all of these English rules I've learned since elementary...They're all pretty natural to me except for maybe one or two (or a few...haha) that I've learned recently. That's why it pays to read a great deal as a kid so you won't have to relearn a bunch of material for grammar and spelling... 😄

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53 minutes ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

Oh, boy, Abeka teaches a lot...But if you'd like, I could share at least twenty things... XD

If it's memorable, go for it. (I have studied the difference between gerunds and participial phrases for 50 years... and have forgotten the difference between gerunds and participial phrases for 50 years. So the memorable part is needed for me. 😊)

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4 hours ago, Spaulding said:

(I have studied the difference between gerunds and participial phrases for 50 years... and have forgotten the difference between gerunds and participial phrases for 50 years. So the memorable part is needed for me. 

Ooh, gerunds and participial phrases!! I'd have to dig through my book for that again...haha. But here are twenty things that I can recall from the top of my head:

 

  1. Never start a sentence with figures. 75 of the 100 cookies have been eaten. (Unacceptable.)
  2. Spell out numbers that consist of one or two words if they're not scientific. twenty-eight, thirty-seven, eighteen; but 110, 875, 1,200
  3. There and here are never subjects. There are three puppies for sale. Puppies is the subject, not there.
  4. Use the Oxford comma (which I've always been taught but just learned the right name for it today...LOL!). Paige plays piano, violin, and flute.
  5. When stating an interrogative sentence that resembles a command, end the sentence with a period. Would you please put this on the desk. NOT   Would you please put this on the desk?
  6. B.C. is written after a given number, and A.D. is written before a given number. 446 B.C., A.D. 70 (You can remember it easily by drawing a cross and putting B.C. on the left side and A.D. on the right. B.C. came before the cross; hence, the number comes before B.C.)
  7. Parentheses minimize, and dashes emphasize. My plan (what is your input on it?) seems to be working well. "Well, I--I--you see--" Melissa stammered.
  8. Use a hyphen between numbers used as adjectives. Twenty-three representatives were at the rally today. However, hyphens aren't needed between numbers used as nouns. Two thirds of the garden has been planted.
  9. When capitalizing brand names, the products are not capitalized along with the name. Toyota Corolla car, Heine's ketchup
  10. In an imperative sentence, understood You is the subject. Leave us alone for a moment please. The subject is understood You. [You] Leave us alone for a moment please.
  11. When writing multiple paragraphs, start each paragraph with an open quotation mark, but only put the closing quotation mark at the end of the last paragraph.
  12. Question marks and exclamation points are not included inside works stated in a sentence unless the works have them in the title. "Who said, 'Is there not a cause?'" asked Mr. Howe. BUT "Who has heard the poem 'Sunset' by Emily Dickenson?" asked Miss Leslie.
  13. Poems, newspaper or magazine articles, songs, short stories, and chapters are enclosed in quotation marks. "The Children's Hour," "How to Wash Your Dog Properly," "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Land down Under: Australia"
  14. Books, newspapers, magazines are italicized. (If you were writing one of the said works out, they would be underlined.) Anne of Green Gables, Pensacola News Journal, Better Homes and Gardens
  15. A colon is used to connect two sentences if the second sentence further explains the first sentence (I learned this this year). A kangaroo is a mammal: it produces milk for its young and has fur.
  16. Never capitalize seasons unless used with personification (fancy term I learned this year as well haha). summer, winter, spring, fall BUT Winter and Summer had such a horrible fight one day.
  17. Always capitalize anything referring to God or the Bible. Jehovah, Elohim, Him, He (both pronouns in reference to God alone), Holy Spirit, Genesis, Joel, Amos, Proverbs 3:5
  18. Streets above twenty but under one hundred have a hyphen in between them; the second part after the hyphen is also not capitalized. Sixty-eighth Avenue, Twenty-first Lane BUT First Street, Ninth Street
  19. When using the titles Honorable or Reverend, these can only be abbreviated with a full name. However, if a full name is used and the word "the" comes before the name, then the title would be written out. The Honorable James Patterson, Honorable Patterson, Hon. James Patterson
  20. Never plagiarize someone else's sentence structure, thoughts, ideas, or wording. Always write what is said in your own words, using your own sentence structure.

There is much, much, MUCH more, but I will not go in that direction. 😄

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3 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

Oh, you mean like the number of spaces between words? The comma before a final "too"? The width of typed margins? (It was 0.7" when I was in typing class.)

 

As well as the comma before conjunctions, using Courier as part of the manuscript style guidelines, emdash instead of dash and the list goes on and on.

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3 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

Oh, you mean like the number of spaces between words? The comma before a final "too"? The width of typed margins? (It was 0.7" when I was in typing class.)

No way! There is no more comma before "too?" When did that happen? 😲

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14 hours ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

There and here are never subjects. There are three puppies for sale. Puppies is the subject, not there.

There is no more. The subject is no more? And can the subject be more than a noun? (aka "no.") 🤔

 

(I recognized 80% of the rest, but now I will be confused with book titles vs. article titles. 😳)

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35 minutes ago, Spaulding said:

There is no more comma before "too?" When did that happen? 

I don't know. Sometime between high school and retirement. You may still put the comma around "too" if it occurs in the middle of a sentence, but it is no longer needed at the end.

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4 hours ago, Spaulding said:

There is no more. The subject is no more? And can the subject be more than a noun? (aka "no.") 

I would think more would be the subject. No would be the adjective. You can have two or more words as a noun (i.e. Pilgrim's Progress or some other book/magazine with a title longer than one word) though.

 

4 hours ago, Spaulding said:

(I recognized 80% of the rest, but now I will be confused with book titles vs. article titles. 😳)

Oh, dear! LOL! Did I explain that too vaguely?

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