Jump to content

Have you read the Space Trilogy?


Recommended Posts

Just curious here. There is apparently a vast division over this little trilogy by C.S. Lewis. Some dislike the whole thing, but more often some really like one book and violently dislike another. I was just curious as to what everyone else thought  about them. My favorite was That Hideous Strength.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've recently begun rereading it, at your suggestion, I believe...

 

I'd mentioned that as a teen, and before I'd become a Christian, I'd read the trilogy. While I was able to read the story in the first two, and even appreciate some of the outlooks/lessons that Lewis wove into the stories, I could make no real sense out of That Hideous Strength. I'd mentioned that there might be more I could learn by rereading it as a Christian, and (I believe it was) you suggested that I reread the whole thing. While I'm just now at the start of Perelandra, I'm guessin' your suggestion was a wise one.

 

So far, I'm havin' no problems with the first two, but as you know, book 3 is a whole different ball game. We'll see what happens when I reach it. Since my fiction reading tends to be kinda' slow & casual, punctuated by a lot more nonfiction, this thread may be a bit long-in-the-tooth before I get there...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm weird. I like Sci-Fi TV shows but not novels. (I can name all two of the ones I've ever read.) And I'm not a big C.S. Lewis fan, although 20,000 people have told me I should be.

 

So, I'm unlikely to ever read it, but want to nominate Ky_GirlatHeart as the only one allowed to name genres -- ever again. 😊

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Spaulding said:

I'm weird. I like Sci-Fi TV shows but not novels. (I can name all two of the ones I've ever read.) And I'm not a big C.S. Lewis fan, although 20,000 people have told me I should be.

 

So, I'm unlikely to ever read it, but want to nominate Ky_GirlatHeart as the only one allowed to name genres -- ever again. 😊

Well, Lewis is one of my favorite authors, but I can really see not liking him.

 

YES! Ky should be the only one ever to name genres. She'll get your book sold for you with genre labels like that, lol.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Wes B said:

While I'm just now at the start of Perelandra, I'm guessin' your suggestion was a wise one.

While they are all different enough to almost land in separate genres, there are interconnected characters and (more importantly) ideas that will certainly throw you by the time you get to That Hideous Strength, especially if you found it confusing the first read-through. Let me know what you think of it when you get to it! Since it's my favorite, I will be very interested in your opinion, whether you like it or not. 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Emily Waldorf said:

Okay then, Y'all: perhaps you've read the Chronicles of Narnia?

And that's why 15,000 people have told me I should like Lewis. (I do like the movies.)

 

The other 5,000 want me to read Screwtape or several of his nonfiction books. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
10 hours ago, BKHunter said:

Read all three. I thought Out of the Silent Planet was best and they went downhill from there. Still, they're one of the best trilogies out there.

 

Agree, Out of the silent planet was best.  Had a hard time with the last book.  After that I read a C.S. Lewis book about a bus trip from hell to heaven.  Can't remember what the name of it was, it was a long time a ago in the church library.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I'd mentioned, I'm gradually rereading the Space Trilogy, at Emily's suggestion. Though this is a work of fiction, it follows a lot of Lewis' nonfiction works, in offering carefully thought out observations on how the fallen world we live in, can subtly influence and distort our walk as Christians.

 

Out of the Silent Planet is heavier on story, yet still surprising in how much of his really interesting observations find their way in, with a story of a human interacting with people in an old world that never experienced the fall. Again, there's a lot of story, but these otherworldly characters' confusion over things we just take for granted tends to underscore just how much we can lose when our eyes aren't fully on God and His plan for us.

 

Perelandra does it more intensely, with less story and more observation, in a young, unfallen world, that may or may not experience a fall, as our world has.

 

I'm presuming that That Hideous Strength, goes deeper yet, as it was all but opaque to me, when i first read it in high school. I'm looking forward to starting it, probably in a few days. (My fiction reading, if it happens at all, is limited to a short time in the evening, before going to sleep.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm now finally a few chapters into That Hideous Strength. Much easier this time through than it was in my high school years. A student will certainly have little feel for the kinds of bureaucracy and organizational politics we see here (but which many of us will have swallowed more than our share of, once out in The Real World...). Seems a perfect bit of allegory to showcase our fallen world, after seeing two unfallen worlds, in it first two books...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.