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Wimpy


Spaulding
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"Weenie out."

 

When I was a kid, this phrase meant someone would wimp out. But wimp was more of a boy-word than a girl-word. And wuss was more of a teen-word than a kid-word. But then there is that whole crude connotation, like "Uranus." Not so much a bad word as it conjures bad words. So, can a nine-year-old girl in a novel say "weenie out?" And if not, got an equivalent that is not "wuss" or "wimp?" Something more girlish than that. 

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My freshman comp and journalism professor, an editor for Yankee Magazine, would probably ask you if a particular character would be more or less likely to say this in response to a particular situation.

 

So, how important is this? Will it become a catch phrase over several sequels, like "Nobody calls me chicken!" in "Back to the Future"? Does this particular nine-year-old use other,  more colorful turns of phrase? 

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