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Well, here I am again. 

 

#1: A woman from my church (she was an old sunday school teacher of mine actually! and she does a lot of painting, like for our vbs) is now in they hospital for heart issues. I’m not sure what exactly but she’s not doing very well. She has kids and grandkids who could really use some prayer, and of course, she can use it 

 

#2: Just found out yesterday that one of my best friends is moving to North Carolina in August. The family is going down this week to check our houses, so definitely prayer for safety and for them to find a good place. 

 

#3: This one is for me. Some of you know this has been a tough year, and to cap it off, my parents aren’t letting me work at camp. I’m trying to get out of the play I’m in so I can at last try to convince my parents. I worked last year and it was the best time of my life, especially spiritually. There’s chapel and music twice a day and we have devotions and it’s so fun!!! Plus I’ve been able to get reach kids and families through Christ, which is a ute blessing, I’ve gone to this camp my whole life, it’s a second home to me, and many of the staff are like family. So I guess the request is that even if I can’t go, that I wouldn’t be so upset. Lately I’ve cried myself to sleep and prayed a lot, trying to get used to it. But it’s like not being allowed time to serve and be with my family. I’m letting a lot of people down, and I’m letting myself down too. Lots of loneliness 😕   so any tips on getting over that… or really just anything would be helpful. 

 

Thank you guys so much! Sorry to kinda dump this on you :(( <333

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29 minutes ago, ThePerilousPen said:

my parents aren’t letting me work at camp


Is there any particular reason for this? Is there any way you could appeal? (When my kids were younger, I told them they could appeal a decision of ours if they had a good attitude and brought new information. It worked really well.)

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3 minutes ago, Johne said:


Is there any particular reason for this? Is there any way you could appeal? (When my kids were younger, I told them they could appeal a decision of ours if they had a good attitude and brought new information. It worked really well.)

I’m not entirely sure. Last summer they were short staffed toward the end (it was late august) so I had a lot to do, and I think my parents think the camp shouldn’t have put me in that position. But I loved it—it was good, hard work. However, at the time, I complained a lot… looking back is when I realize that it was good for me.

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5 minutes ago, ThePerilousPen said:

But I loved it—it was good, hard work. However, at the time, I complained a lot… looking back is when I realize that it was good for me.


Maybe that's your grounds for appeal: it's good, hard work, and it will help create character. (And then, if they do agree and you go, make sure you don't complain.) 

But whatever they say, tell them you'll abide by their wishes. (That goes a long way toward helping tipping parents who are on the fence - a good attitude from their kids is gold for parents. Ask me how I know...) 😉

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58 minutes ago, Johne said:


Maybe that's your grounds for appeal: it's good, hard work, and it will help create character. (And then, if they do agree and you go, make sure you don't complain.) 

But whatever they say, tell them you'll abide by their wishes. (That goes a long way toward helping tipping parents who are on the fence - a good attitude from their kids is gold for parents. Ask me how I know...) 😉

Okay! Those sound great, thank you :))

 

How do you know? 😁

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21 minutes ago, ThePerilousPen said:

How do you know? 😁

 

Linda and I raised two kids, a daughter (now married with three really beautiful kids), and a son (who lives in the apartment upstairs and pays us when he's not in school). In our house I had a policy not to fret about spilled milk - accidents happen, y'know? But the thing I paid the most attention to was attitude. Mistakes and accidents happen, but you can fix anything minor if you've got a good attitude, so we really focused heavily on always telling the truth and always having a good attitude, even (perhaps especially) when things break or don't work out. 

When my son was first learning to drive, we went to the world's largest Culver's restaurant (which is just down the road from here). After we ate, as he was pulling out of his parking space, he scratched the bumper of a white car from the next state over. I felt the familiar rush of adrenalin you get in a heightened situation but I kept my voice calm and instructed him to pull into stall. I told him to stay with the car while I went inside the restaurant to find the owner.

I went to the counters and asked if they had an overhead PA - they didn't. (They looked at me like I was crazy. The Manager thanked me for coming back inside. She said people never do that.) So I proceeded to go up to every table in the restaurant, one after another, asking if they had a white sedan. It was humiliating but I prayed and kept my cool. Nobody inside owned a white car. I was initially relieved, but told God I'd still do the right thing if the owner was outside.

I went outside and saw the owner just as he approached his car and opened his door. I gestured for my son to come over. I went up to the driver, introduced myself, held out my hand, and explained that my son was a new driver and had accidentally scraped his back bumper. The driver hadn't noticed the scratch. (A careful reader will realize we could have left and no one would have been the wiser, but I don't serve God only when it benefits me, I serve God all the time, and especially when I make a mistake.) My son apologized and I found out the car was a lease and he'd have to fix the scratch before he turned it back in. We exchanged information and I later sent him $500 to repair the scratch. 

Here's the thing - by having a good attitude and practicing my maxim about not losing it over spilled milk, my son learned a valuable lesson about the love I have for him, about personal accountability when we mess up, and that any problem can be addressed head on without yelling, melting down, or pointing fingers. At the end of the day, my son learned to be more careful (which has likely saved him from accidents), that man learned that a Christian and his son were stand-up guys, and it brought my son closer to me at a time when teenagers typically are more rebellious. We were able to avoid the teenage rebellion phase with him entirely.

That's how I know. 😉

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20 minutes ago, Johne said:

 

Linda and I raised two kids, a daughter (now married with three really beautiful kids), and a son (who lives in the apartment upstairs and pays us when he's not in school). In our house I had a policy not to fret about spilled milk - accidents happen, y'know? But the thing I paid the most attention to was attitude. Mistakes and accidents happen, but you can fix anything minor if you've got a good attitude, so we really focused heavily on always telling the truth and always having a good attitude, even (perhaps especially) when things break or don't work out. 

When my son was first learning to drive, we went to the world's largest Culver's restaurant (which is just down the road from here). After we ate, as he was pulling out of his parking space, he scratched the bumper of a white car from the next state over. I felt the familiar rush of adrenalin you get in a heightened situation but I kept my voice calm and instructed him to pull into stall. I told him to stay with the car while I went inside the restaurant to find the owner.

I went to the counters and asked if they had an overhead PA - they didn't. (They looked at me like I was crazy. The Manager thanked me for coming back inside. She said people never do that.) So I proceeded to go up to every table in the restaurant, one after another, asking if they had a white sedan. It was humiliating but I prayed and kept my cool. Nobody inside owned a white car. I was initially relieved, but told God I'd still do the right thing if the owner was outside.

I went outside and saw the owner just as he approached his car and opened his door. I gestured for my son to come over. I went up to the driver, introduced myself, held out my hand, and explained that my son was a new driver and had accidentally scraped his back bumper. The driver hadn't noticed the scratch. (A careful reader will realize we could have left and no one would have been the wiser, but I don't serve God only when it benefits me, I serve God all the time, and especially when I make a mistake.) My son apologized and I found out the car was a lease and he'd have to fix the scratch before he turned it back in. We exchanged information and I later sent him $500 to repair the scratch. 

Here's the thing - by having a good attitude and practicing my maxim about not losing it over spilled milk, my son learned a valuable lesson about the love I have for him, about personal accountability when we mess up, and that any problem can be addressed head on without yelling, melting down, or pointing fingers. At the end of the day, my son learned to be more careful (which has likely saved him from accidents), that man learned that a Christian and his son were stand-up guys, and it brought my son closer to me at a time when teenagers typically are more rebellious. We were able to avoid the teenage rebellion phase with him entirely.

That's how I know. 😉

That's an amazing story!! Thank you so much for sharing, it's really inspiring to hear about stuff like that :)) And congratulations on your kids and grandkids! That's quite an achievement! 

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This is a hard way to learn about the consequences of complaining, although there are certainly times when it is appropriate. Praying that you can present your case to your parents in such a way that they see the lessons you have learned. 

 

And thanking Johne for his testimony.

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1 hour ago, carolinamtne said:

If I read your post correctly, you are involved in a play that conflicts time wise with the camp? That sounds like you have a conflict of responsibilities. Praying that you make the right decision.

I don’t want to be in this play :/ frankly, I’m one of the only kids and I don’t feel comfortable around all those adults. And it’s an hour away, outside… it’s a lot of hassle for a small part, especially when I’m giving up camp for it. I think spiritual responsibilities are more important, and I’m afraid that the play is me focusing on my career and dreams. Camp is a place where I can grow in my faith and help others do the same— that’s better, right? *sigh* I’m not even sure 

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26 minutes ago, ThePerilousPen said:

I don’t want to be in this play 😕 frankly, I’m one of the only kids and I don’t feel comfortable around all those adults. And it’s an hour away, outside… it’s a lot of hassle for a small part, especially when I’m giving up camp for it. I think spiritual responsibilities are more important, and I’m afraid that the play is me focusing on my career and dreams. Camp is a place where I can grow in my faith and help others do the same— that’s better, right? *sigh* I’m not even sure 

After your experience with the play, do you still want to pursue acting?  (Although I guess if the play was closer or if it didn't collide with camp dates you'd probably like it more)

 

Also, how many weeks is your camp?

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27 minutes ago, Just_Me_ said:

After your experience with the play, do you still want to pursue acting?  (Although I guess if the play was closer or if it didn't collide with camp dates you'd probably like it more)

 

Also, how many weeks is your camp?

Yes, I do. But different acting--theater and screen are very different. Though you're right, if it didn't collide with those dates it would be much better)

 

one week long 😕 

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2 minutes ago, ThePerilousPen said:

Yes, I do. But different acting--theater and screen are very different. Though you're right, if it didn't collide with those dates it would be much better)

 

one week long 😕 

 

1 minute ago, ThePerilousPen said:

well it's one week per camp, but it has summer camps from the end of may to the end of august (some camps are for homeschoolers)

Ohh gotcha 😕 

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Sorry, Kate.  Seems like you always have a rough lot on your plate.  My pastor's wife, who teaches the women's Sunday school, said recently that afflictions are our lot in life.  In spite of that, we should not be moved!

 

Praying for all your requests.  Especially, I hope that your parents can see that camp is obviously something you need and that helps you.  

 

Is this the same play you told us about before?  I thought you were ecstatic about it.  I'm sorry it's not working out for you.

 

I'm actually doing both this summer.  I'm doing ministry training for two weeks (I'm leaving the Sunday after next, actually) and yet I'll still be involved in two plays this summer.  It's more responsibility and stress, but I think it will be doable.  Praying that, like me, you will find a way to work with whatever comes your way.

 

Love ya, Kate. 💕

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