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Do Your Co-Workers Know You Are a Christian?


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14 hours ago, Acogah W Swann said:

I was on another thread on this site which presumably is mostly Christian writers and I asked twice of this fellow if he is a Christian to which he didn't answer,

 

14 hours ago, Acogah W Swann said:

I think most are Christian just one-day-on-a-Sunday and then back to the grind of every day life.


I presume you didn't intend to come across as pretentious and proud but I begin to see why someone might not want to engage with your question. 

There are lots of reasons why this person may not have engaged your question: extroversion / introversion, feeling it's a 'gotcha' question, simply being busy in Real Life and not following the thread for an hour or a day, there are lots of  entirely valid reasons. 

Jesus modeled The Golden Rule. I try to put myself in the other guy's shoes. If I was this fellow, I might think your question was rude and not answering was a way of taking the high road. Pursuing him over there and then over here begins to look like abuse. In John 15 Christ commands His followers to love one another as Christ loved them. Does that look like love to you?

Perhaps a better question is this: how will people know we here in this thread are Christians? I have a suggestion:
John 13:35
35 By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.

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To answer your larger question, yes.

In my bio, I always rattle off a list of my interests: I love God, Prog Rock, Space Opera, Film Noir, and the Green Bay Packers. My passions are public and I rave about the things I'm passion about all the time. I'm not ashamed of any of these things - they're who I am. I try to live this out in public by obeying the commandments of Jesus, by living a life of grace and love and humility. I stumble all the time and try to be a quick repenter and quick forgiver. When I die, I want my enemies and friends to look at me and say 'There went a man of God.'

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This article just appeared in my inbox. It is an excellent answer to the question. Here's one paragraph:

 

Jesus' words in Acts 1:8 flesh out this picture of being an ambassador. “You will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” Jesus does not send his followers to go witnessing, but to be his witnesses. To go witnessing might only mean speaking words about God somewhere away from home, but to be a witness means living a life that shows God’s love wherever we are. In fact, we are never commanded in the Bible to go witnessing. To focus on telling before showing disconnects who we are from what we say—and that’s a problem.

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Another point:

 

When we serve other people through our actions, we bring the love of Jesus to them. Evangelism is not as much about bringing people to Jesus but bringing Jesus to people—to show and then tell.

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Guest Wesley Southern

Personally, I haven’t found Acogah to be excessively pretentious or proud (yet)

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1 hour ago, lynnmosher said:

Another point:

 

When we serve other people through our actions, we bring the love of Jesus to them. Evangelism is not as much about bringing people to Jesus but bringing Jesus to people—to show and then tell.

Yes, good point!

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I think a large issue relating to the way people share their faith relates back to their own salvation. One of the biggest issues in the church is discipleship. People come to salvation, they are now adopted into the family of God, but who is showing them what that means, who is modelling what it looks like to be a child of God and is what they are seeing the correct reflection of Jesus nature?

 

When a child is adopted into a family, they may be part of the family, but it takes time for them to learn and reflect the values of the family so that they are seen as part of the family both in name and nature.

 

For me I have always looked at being a child of God is a journey, I'm not saying I'm right or wrong it's just how I see it and if everyone if free to disagree with me.

 

After our initial acceptance of salvation we are in a master/slave relationship, we are no longer a slave to sin, but rather a slave to righteousness. The meaning of slave in this instance is not as we usually take the word, but regardless we have been redeemed and bought with a price that we cannot repay. In this new found identity we read our Bibles and pray because that is what we are told we need to do in order to grow in our relationship with God, so we are obedient out of duty.

 

As we grow in our relationship with God and learn what it truly means to follow God and be a child of God we transition to a servant, we are willing to obey because we know it is good for us, yet we still do not fully comprehend or accept our true identity, so we are obedient out of desire and loyalty. We are gaining knowledge and understanding, but still don't fully understand not just what we believe, but why we believe what we do.

 

Growing and learning from God and those around us who are mature, we finally come to the realization, understanding and acceptance of our true identity in Christ, a child of the king, a co-heair and we are obedient out of love for our Father in heaven and willing lay down our lives to take up our cross. It is at this point that although we are not perfect, we can show love to others as God loves us and we can reflect the image of Jesus.

 

This is the path of discipleship, but if people try to skip a stage of growth or do not have the mentoring needed to grow properly, then their journey is much more difficult and lengthy and there is always a risk that the enemy may try to mess with their learning leaving them tainted or twisted.

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On 6/9/2021 at 3:06 PM, Wesley Southern said:

Personally, I haven’t found Acogah to be excessively pretentious or proud (yet)

I suspect most here would say the same thing. (I would go so far as to drop the "excessively"  too. Sometimes we say things we mean, but not the way it comes out. My main problem as a writer and a person. 🥴) Then again, we all hope the same thing can be said about us. I think this all goes back to that passage in 2 Tim. where we are to provoke, rebuke and exhort. This is why we need each other, to empty ourselves of self, and fill with the Holy Spirit. (Yeah, you too. You need it as much as we all do. 😉)

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