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On 5/7/2021 at 2:46 PM, ThePerilousPen said:

 

but still XD book characters are stupid sometimes. smh they can mess up REALLY bad and not bat an eyelid . . .

This is random, but I felt the need to say this.  I was writing one afternoon, and had one of my characters say to her husband, "How do you feel?" or something like that.  Problem: he was in the hospital.

 

When I actually saw that, I screamed, backspaced faster than the speed of light, got up, and banged my head against the wall.

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Not true. I can't tell you how many books I've given up on that I started out enjoying. When I was younger, I had a "finish what you start" ethic, and I'd plow on through once I started reading, wheth

Your protagonist doesn't have to be an intellectual genius, but she does need to have common sense.  I just stopped reading a novel because the main character did something incredibly foolish, even th

me reading this: *panics* THIS SOUNDS LIKE MY CHARACTER   also me: *remembers that my book is not published* oh yeah duh     but still XD book characters are stupid sometimes.

2 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

This is random, but I felt the need to say this.  I was writing one afternoon, and had one of my characters say to her husband, "How do you feel?" or something like that.  Problem: he was in the hospital.

 

When I actually saw that, I screamed, backspaced faster than the speed of light, got up, and banged my head against the wall.

XDDDDD

 

 

yeah my dumb...uhh donkey (XD) characters ask the MC (ya know, Sav) how she's feeling and she's like 😑

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@Grey_Skies Are you actually okay though??? Your poor head...

 

@ThePerilousPen I mean, to be fair, I guess that's how people try to check in with those who are struggling the most. To the person getting all of that, it seems annoying and makes him wish it would go away. (Or maybe he actually doesn't mind it...depends I guess.) To the other people, they think that's what they need to do to try to connect to that person and help them out.

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10 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

This is random, but I felt the need to say this.  I was writing one afternoon, and had one of my characters say to her husband, "How do you feel?" or something like that.  Problem: he was in the hospital.

 

When I actually saw that, I screamed, backspaced faster than the speed of light, got up, and banged my head against the wall.

I could actually overlook a mistake like this one.  In that situation, we find it difficult thinking of the right thing to say.  And if she realized it was a silly question to ask, that's even better!

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54 minutes ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

 

 

@ThePerilousPen I mean, to be fair, I guess that's how people try to check in with those who are struggling the most. To the person getting all of that, it seems annoying and makes him wish it would go away. (Or maybe he actually doesn't mind it...depends I guess.) To the other people, they think that's what they need to do to try to connect to that person and help them out.

true!! 

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I think it boils down to what one of you said.  If the character is going against character, watch out.  That's what happened in the scene I've been writing about.  If the reader thinks, "That character would never do that," you've lost her.  

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10 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

This is random, but I felt the need to say this.  I was writing one afternoon, and had one of my characters say to her husband, "How do you feel?" or something like that.  Problem: he was in the hospital.

 

When I actually saw that, I screamed, backspaced faster than the speed of light, got up, and banged my head against the wall.

 

Heyyy GS! Ya know, Woody Allen once whined, "Thank God the public only sees the final product!"

 

No one gets things close to right the first time. An artist's first sketch has faint lines all over the place that only approximate where the final lines will go. Comedy writers typically produce ten faintly related gags for a particular spot, and keep only the best one. In movies and TV, they'll often do 5-10 takes of each scene, looking for the one that works best.

 

Only writers seem to think that their words have to look good, the very first time they put them down.

 

Our initial writing is just an exploration into what the final words will be. It's okay if it's sloppy and rough; that's why it's called... wait for it... a rough draft... I know you've mentioned elsewhere that you feel stressed in your writing. You may be expecting more of yourself than anyone can actually do. Let your first draft just be a study into the feasibility of the piece, enjoy the act of slowly uncovering something far better, and thank God that the public will only see the final product 🙂

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I'm rather embarrassed.  I discovered how easy it is to get back to the beginning of an ebook.  Earlier, I said I didn't know how to do that.  Anyway, I tried to locate the scene I've been discussing, and I couldn't find it.  But I know it's there!  It changed my entire attitude about the book. 

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6 hours ago, jadijohnson said:

I'm rather embarrassed.  I discovered how easy it is to get back to the beginning of an ebook.  Earlier, I said I didn't know how to do that.  Anyway, I tried to locate the scene I've been discussing, and I couldn't find it.  But I know it's there!  It changed my entire attitude about the book. 

Instead of going back to locate that awful decision scene, at least for our sake, can you finish reading the book and then let us know? Does the protagonist improve learning from her mistakes? Is there a redemption at the end of the story? Even if there is none of these, does the book work well as a cautionary tale, as a warning to young girls who might likely commit such a dumb mistake? 

 

We cannot easily pre-guess the end-game authors are after; sometimes they make fool of us. Help us to see what kind of  author this one is. 

 

Just a modest request. 

Edited by Teddy
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2 hours ago, Teddy said:

Instead of going back to locate that awful decision scene, at least for our sake, can you finish reading the book and then let us know? Does the protagonist improve learning from her mistakes? Is their a redemption at the end of the story? Even if there is none of these, does the book work well as a cautionary tale, as a warning to young girls who might likely commit such a dumb mistake? 

 

We cannot easily pre-guess the end-game authors are after; sometimes they make fool of us. Help us to see what kind of  author this one is. 

 

Just a modest demand. 

I will accept this request, Teddy.  I think it would be a good learning experience for all of us.  I'll let you know what I discover.  😀

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@Ky_GirlatHeart Aw, thanks for asking! 😊 Yeah, trust me, I'm fine.  My head has taken more and worse things than a couple of poundings against the wall over some bad dialogue. 🙄

 

@Wes B Thank you so much!  I appreciate your encouragement, definitely means a lot.  God bless you, sir!

Edited by Grey_Skies
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19 hours ago, Teddy said:

Instead of going back to locate that awful decision scene, at least for our sake, can you finish reading the book and then let us know? Does the protagonist improve learning from her mistakes? Is there a redemption at the end of the story? Even if there is none of these, does the book work well as a cautionary tale, as a warning to young girls who might likely commit such a dumb mistake? 

 

We cannot easily pre-guess the end-game authors are after; sometimes they make fool of us. Help us to see what kind of  author this one is. 

 

Just a modest request. 

I don't think I can keep reading this book.  I picked up where I left off, and I already found a flaw.  Three people went into a heavily guarded building to rescue someone.  Although they planned on how to get in, they didn't plan an escape route.  So now they can't get out.  I can't help seeing this as just a way for the author to bring on the drama and suspense.  It shouldn't be so obvious that that's what you're after.  And I'm seeing the Dumb Protagonist Syndrome at work again.  The protagonist is one of the "rescuers."  

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24 minutes ago, jadijohnson said:

I'll have to display my ignorance again and ask, "What does SP stand for?" 😀

Oh, you probably mean "self-published." (I guess I'm a dumb protagonist!!)  I'll go take a look...

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2 minutes ago, jadijohnson said:

Oh, you probably mean "self-published." (I guess I'm a dumb protagonist!!)  I'll go take a look...

Nope, this author is not self-published.  The editor who was assigned to this novel must have needed a cup of coffee to perk her up!!  She let a few errors slip past her.

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7 minutes ago, jadijohnson said:

Nope, this author is not self-published.  The editor who was assigned to this novel must have needed a cup of coffee to perk her up!!  She let a few errors slip past her.

I respect your judgement. But to be fair to the author, what kind of review is the book getting? Do most readers come to the same conclusion like yours? 

 

Had you finished reading the book, you could have shared with us your insight:  "Ten common mistakes to avoid in plot development". 

 

Question: Why is Don Quixote so popular in literature? It is a tale of a hero doing the improbable and the implausible.

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10 minutes ago, Teddy said:

I respect your judgement. But to be fair to the author, what kind of review is the book getting? Do most readers come to the same conclusion like yours? 

 

Had you finished reading the book, you could have shared with us your insight:  "Ten common mistakes to avoid in plot development". 

 

Question: Why is Don Quixote so popular in literature? It is a tale of a hero doing the improbable and the implausible.

That's a good question, Teddy.  I'm curious to see what non-writers are saying about the book.  I understand that most readers don't notice plot holes like the ones we would catch.  But it reminds me of what writers are cautioned about regarding research:  You never know when an expert on your subject is reading your novel.  You'd better have your facts straight!  A similar warning could be:  You never know when another novelist is reading your book! 

 

I've noted two common mistakes to avoid in plot development.  I hope that's enough for now! 

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