Jump to content

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Accord64 said:

So while the source of the fetal cell line is from fetal tissue from an abortion in 1973, it's not actually dead baby cells. And it was only to test, not manufacture the vaccines. 

So you're saying if some scientist murdered me, harvested some of my cells, cloned them or whatever, then used them in the testing phase of a vaccine, that's okay? Because it's not okay. Just because the baby was murdered a long time ago doesn't make the murder any less horrific.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, HK1 said:

So you're saying if some scientist murdered me, harvested some of my cells, cloned them or whatever, then used them in the testing phase of a vaccine, that's okay? Because it's not okay. Just because the baby was murdered a long time ago doesn't make the murder any less horrific.

 

So my question to you is why would you reject a vaccine in which fetal cells had nothing to do in the development or manufacture, but one test utilized a fetal cell line? 

 

If someone murdered me 50 years ago, I'd hope that the perpetrator would someday be brought to justice. But if scientists cloned my cells to help test a vaccine that one day saved millions of lives, I'd be okay with that. 

 

I also found it interesting (but not critical to my decision) that "the Vatican issued clear guidance that permits Roman Catholics in good faith to receive COVID-19 vaccines that use fetal cell lines in development or production." The Catholic church is extremely sensitive about abortion.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

After careful prayer and discussion with actual Christian researchers, we determined the vaccines are both safe and morally acceptable for our purposes: Linda got the Pfizer vaccine, and I had the Moderna. Everyone will have to grapple with their own conscience. For us, the weight of evidence and the strong recommendations from practicing medical and research professionals whom I know personally persuaded us that being vaccinated was appropriate for us. Everyone will have to make their own decision, and I support whatever decision you make after research and prayer.
https://biologos.org/common-questions/should-christians-get-vaccinated

 

Quote

 

One solution currently in place involves cells derived from fetal tissue. It’s important to state this clearly: The individual human cells used for some vaccines’ development today are not, and have never been, part of an actual human body or fetus. How does this work? The original cells in question were isolated from one of several fetuses aborted in the 1960s and 1970s. Those cells were kept alive in a lab, for a brief period, to generate what’s called an “immortalized” cell line. Decades after the death of the original fetal cells, cells that descended from the original (fetal) cells are the ones used in the development of certain vaccines. These lab-grown cells are therefore not properly considered fetal tissue at all.
 

The circumstances of the original abortions are often unknown (in fact, some cell lines may have been derived from a miscarriage). But abortions were not performed in order to supply these cells, nor do the resulting vaccines contain human cells or fetal material in any way. Furthermore, ongoing vaccine research does not incentivize the establishment of new cell lines from recent abortions. (Research with new cell lines would require starting from scratch with costly regulatory approval, a pointless hurdle since the longstanding immortalized cell lines are already available.)
 

The question for pro-life Christians, then, is whether accepting a vaccine developed in this manner is objectionable, or would in any way make us morally complicit in the original decisions to abort decades ago. While the association with abortion gives many Christians pause, there is substantial agreement among Christian theologians and ethicists that the connection to fetal cell lines should not make these vaccines off-limits for Christians. BioLogos’ founder Francis Collins, an outspoken Christian and leading medical researcher, often gives an analogy that many find helpful. Imagine you’re in urgent need of a heart transplant, and a heart from an organ donor becomes available. But it turns out the organ donor was murdered. By accepting the transplant would you be complicit in his murder? Would you feel compelled to reject the transplant given the circumstances of the donor’s death? The Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission echoes this analogy in concluding that pro-life Christians can accept these vaccines, even while urging the development of alternative methods. Similar conclusions are drawn by the evangelical Center for Bioethics and Human Dignity, and ethical guidance from the Roman Catholic Church.
 

Even if you’ve never received a vaccine, medical research based on these cell lines is so ubiquitous that “chances are if you have had a medical intervention in this country or pretty much any other country, you have benefited from the use of these cell lines in some way,” as one bioethicist reminds us. While discomfort with that reality may drive some Christians to press for alternative methods in the future, we should not feel compelled to forego the life-saving value of these vaccines in the present.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Accord64 said:

So my question to you is why would you reject a vaccine in which fetal cells had nothing to do in the development or manufacture, but one test utilized a fetal cell line?

Because abortion is murder. Don't you have a problem with scientists/doctors murdering people, then using the murdered individuals remains for medical experimentation? That's wrong ... ethically, morally, biblically.

12 minutes ago, Accord64 said:

I also found it interesting (but not critical to my decision) that "the Vatican issued clear guidance that permits Roman Catholics in good faith to receive COVID-19 vaccines that use fetal cell lines in development or production."

I'm not Catholic, and what the Vatican says has no bearing on my decisions. But the Bible is very clear on murder.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, HK1 said:

Because abortion is murder. Don't you have a problem with scientists/doctors murdering people, then using the murdered individuals remains for medical experimentation? That's wrong ... ethically, morally, biblically.

 

Yes, abortion is murder.

 

No, the remains of this particular fetus was not directly used to for medical experimentation. In fact, I feel the way in which it was (very) indirectly used actually redeemed a horrible act without perpetuating it into a new industry.

 

In the end, the choice is yours.

Edited by Accord64
Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay. I think this has played. It's one of those divisional posts that never get resolved. We all have our own opinions on this topic and they usually don't mesh. Therefore, I'm closing this. Thank you all.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.