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No... not my ideas; I wish they were. From a very interesting YouTube channel, from someone who's worked hard to produce truly interesting content. This isn't his point, but it makes me remember that if I truly want to glorify God in my work, I'll want to be patient, learn my craft carefully & diligently, and strive to produce excellence. And that's only a bit of my takeaway. As I said though, it wasn't the maker's point at all...

 

 

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I didn't listen to the whole video as my time is limited at the moment, but his first point about not striving to be a one hit wonders is true. I agree with your takeaway. Do our best and leave the rest to God. Trying to please the world is impossible.

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43 minutes ago, Cecilia Marie said:

I didn't listen to the whole video as my time is limited at the moment, but his first point about not striving to be a one hit wonders is true. I agree with your takeaway. Do our best and leave the rest to God. Trying to please the world is impossible.

Amen.

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22 hours ago, Wes B said:

it makes me remember that if I truly want to glorify God in my work, I'll want to be patient, learn my craft carefully & diligently, and strive to produce excellence.

 

This is a great take-away. We need to always be in a learning mode. Glorifying God must be the aim of all Christian writers. We learn by reading, by doing, and by recognizing our mistakes and learning from them.

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One thing about Tom Scott's videos is that they work on an astonishing number of levels, yet they're written to make it look like he's not even trying at all. Each looks & feels like just a casual chat, yet each is masterfully written, with not a superfluous word, and everything that looks like a digression is a careful segue into the next point to be made.

 

Because there's so much information to deliver in such a tiny space, it's delivered almost non-stop at a staccato that most of us couldn't maintain even in a conversation, and carefully memorized, yet the speed is almost invisible to us as listeners. It truly sounds like a casual chat. Again, the writing leaves me almost awestruck, as everything intertwines, builds on everything else, and leads to a real conclusion that leaves the audience feeling enlightened.

 

There's one of his videos titled something like The Greatest Title Sequence Ever Seen, that gives some insight into just how much attention to detail this man gives, and shows why he has nearly four million subscribers. We might choose to give that video a pass, as it relates to a series of British TV specials that don't matter to us, but take a moment to listen to how and why he'll heap praise onto someone else's success. It also gives a lot of insight into why he's achieved what he's done.

 

And that's just his technique and attitude; i haven't even touched on his content. The easiest (but not all) of his takeaways might be:

  1. Quick success is neither likely nor even desirable. Take the time to learn your craft carefully and well, so you'll have the skills to adapt when some of your work starts to gain some traction.
  2. An initial success, if poorly planned, could end up defining us to our audiences in ways we don't want, or can't competently handle.
  3. Providing what our audience likes can be far, far, far more important than trying to get our audience to follow what we like.
  4. Working on a project we like is still fine, as long as we're not expecting others to see it with our passion.
  5. Be prepared to try a lot of things. The implicit takeaway there is that we have to be flexible as we find ways to relate to our audience (and also in our cases, agents, editors, etc. ...)

...and these are just the quick & easy ones. There is soooooo much more in there. It's high-grade ore, and I'm just beginning to mine it. I have no indication of any sort as to Mr. Scott's spiritual leanings, but as a Christian writer, I get a renewed understanding that if I write to serve the Kingdom of God, I'd be wise to truly be a servant in every way imaginable. Also, I must understand that the master I serve is The Master of the Whole, Complete, Total Universe, and I have every reason to make sure I give my very, very, very best, 'cuz my Master deserves nothing less.

 

Sadly, I have an awful long way to go. S'okay... He's one patient and amazing Master...

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8 hours ago, Cecilia Marie said:

I didn't listen to the whole video as my time is limited at the moment, but his first point about not striving to be a one hit wonders is true. I agree with your takeaway. Do our best and leave the rest to God. Trying to please the world is impossible.

...and I truly appreciate your giving a peek. My other summary above is in many peoples' TL;DR category, so I'll just say I also rarely watch whole videos, 'cuz you can't do a quick scan and decide if it's worth our attention. So I hesitated to post a video, but this one's so information-rich that I spot new nuggets each time I watch it.

 

Totally understand that none of us has time to watch every vid, but if there's a spare moment anywhere, anywhen, I'll bet a second peek will give even more insights. 

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On 5/6/2021 at 5:21 PM, Wes B said:

...and I truly appreciate your giving a peek. My other summary above is in many peoples' TL;DR category, so I'll just say I also rarely watch whole videos, 'cuz you can't do a quick scan and decide if it's worth our attention. So I hesitated to post a video, but this one's so information-rich that I spot new nuggets each time I watch it.

 

Totally understand that none of us has time to watch every vid, but if there's a spare moment anywhere, anywhen, I'll bet a second peek will give even more insights. 

Good thoughts. We can always revisit as time allows. 😄 

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You're more than welcome, @suspensewriter. I might point out that this video is actually the third in a set that tells the story of how he made it big on YouTube, and how much older one-off successes amounted to little, except as learning experiences that only made sense much later.  I didn't mention all three, as even asking people to watch one video can be a bit much.

 

I'm impressed with how humble he is with his success, understanding that it's come from lots of work in looking for things that really and truly relate to others. There seems to be no recognition of his own brilliance (which I think is actually there...), a quiet acceptance that what he's accomplished could suddenly end without notice, and an understanding that his audience owes him nothing. He's committed to finding ways to inform/enlighten/amuse/entertain them on their terms, not his. It's just a very refreshing attitude to see, on top of a very fun set of videos. It also suggests a lot about why his stuff stands out the way it does...

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