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OK calling all grammar gurus 

 

The title of my book of meditations is 'Were you there?'

 

Now, I had it write as above but someone is saying to me that it should be 'Where you there?'

 

To me 'where is used when identifying a place - ie. Where is New York?'

 

'Were' is used when you want to ask or state an action 'they were going to the shops'

 

So which one is correct? (Keep in mind this is UK English I am using)

 

1. Where you there?

 

2. Were you there?

 

Thanks

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Were is your verb in the sentence.  Both where and there are place words and not verbs.  Throw in a pronoun and the sentence still makes no sense.  You were right in the first place. 

 

(I was gonna write "Ewe where write in the first place," but Aye showed such self-control by not dewing sew. :) )

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Were you there.

 

3 hours ago, Shamrock said:

'Were' is used when you want to ask or state an action

 

Which is exactly what you were doing.

 

I don't know who said "Where you there?" was correct, but they were either licking toads at the time, or consuming mushrooms.

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4 hours ago, Shamrock said:

Now, I had it write as above but someone is saying to me that it should be 'Where you there?'

 

Trust your instincts. "Where you there" doesn't make any semblance of sense. "Where were you," maybe, but that's it.

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I think it's a matter of mispronunciation. There are a number of words that are erroneously interchanged today, not just "where/were," because they aren't pronounced correctly. Listen when young folks today say "where." They leave out the "h" and pronounce it as if it were "were." (Go to the dictionary.com entry for "where" and click to hear how it should be pronounced).

"Are" and "our" are also interchanged because of mispronunciation. (Around here, we say "our," but people who have moved here from northern climes say "are" when they mean "our".) I remember a number of years ago, the prom program for a senior class in a Chicago high school had the title "This Is Are Story." Really? Not "This Is Our Story"? And I understood how it happened when I saw a news story about the teachers in Chicago who were on strike, carrying signs that advocated paying "are teachers" more money. Hmmmm...... 

Edited by Tommie Lyn
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23 hours ago, Tommie Lyn said:

 I remember a number of years ago, the prom program for a senior class in a Chicago high school had the title "This Is Are Story." Really? Not "This Is Our Story"?

 A pirate prom: This is Arrh! Story.

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