Jump to content

Male Christian Spec-Fic Authors Should Look Outside


Recommended Posts

Christian SF/F author Mike Duran posted this on his FB page today. Realm Makers has grown into one of the premier Christian writer's groups.

Quote

 

Out of the 40 finalists for the 2021 Realm Awards, 7 are men. So that's like 17-18%, which is about the average of males represented in Christian fiction publishing. What makes this interesting is that the Realm Awards (hosted by Realm Makers) is for religious-friendly speculative fiction. The group was formed partly in reaction to the lack of spec representation in Christian publishing. However, the same demographic tilt appears to have followed RM (being that Christian fiction publishing is mainly female).

Here's the interesting part: In the mainstream general market, spec-fic is tilted more towards males. At least, it used to be. This has been so evident that gender quotas are now the norm. For example, the Hugo Awards are on a big "diversity" push. This year, all five nominees for Best Novel are female. (I think that happened last year as well.) Point being, in general market spec-fic there has been a concerted effort to "balance" the identitarian scales.

Although I'm all for more men reading and writing Christian-themed spec-fic, I'm not big on such quota efforts. There's more intrinsic reasons why males gravitate to spec-fic... except in Christian fiction circles. (I wrestled with this in my article "Five Reasons Why Christian Publishers Have Lost Male Readers" which I'll link in the comments). I point this out, not to complain or advocate for change, as much as to note that publishing demographics are destiny, so to speak. Christian men who write and/or read spec-fic are better suited to look outside the Christian publishing fold. Truth is, there's more than just male migration away from Christian fiction in play here. Nominating more men to such awards would only artificially inflate their numbers and interest (as I think the Hugo "diversity" drive is doing). I mean, the best way to get more male representation in Christian spec-fic circles is to get more men interested in the genre. And that's a whole other subject.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

What does he mean by that, Johne?

 

Publishing SF/F from a Christian worldview via more Mainstream publishers.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

    What I do, is not mention that there is Christian content in my writings.  For genre classification, I might call some of them "Speculative, Suspense, Fiction".  It's only after someone starts reading what I've written, when he or she discovers the Christian Content.  

Edited by William D'Andrea
Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Jeff Potts said:

Trust me, that won't happen.


Mike Duran's Reagan Moon paranoir novels are doing ok. They're not explicitly labeled as Christian but contain a Christian Worldview if the reader has eyes to see. They're fast-moving, weird, and a lot of fun.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074CFD9K5?searchxofy=true&binding=kindle_edition&ref_=dbs_s_aps_series_rwt_tkin&qid=1618866975&sr=8-1

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Johne said:


Mike Duran's Reagan Moon paranoir novels are doing ok. They're not explicitly labeled as Christian but contain a Christian Worldview if the reader has eyes to see. They're fast-moving, weird, and a lot of fun.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074CFD9K5?searchxofy=true&binding=kindle_edition&ref_=dbs_s_aps_series_rwt_tkin&qid=1618866975&sr=8-1

 

There are two publishers cited with Mike Duran's work on Amazon.  One is Realms, the other is Blue Crescent Press.  I cannot find either on the Internet.  So either they've both gone defunct, or these are the business names under which he self-publishes his books.  He seems big enough to start his own publisher, so that's probably what he's done for business reasons.

 

But, by all accounts, it looks like he's been self-publishing.

 

When I said "that won't happen," I was referring to your comment about going through "mainstream publishers."  

 

I don't want this to devolve into a self-publish vs. traditional publish thread, but after seeing what agents are looking for, and what many "traditional publishers" are requesting, anything Speculative with a Christian message will end up on a slush pile no matter how well it's written.  Maybe if you are a known quantity, exceptions will be made.  But for someone like me?  Forget it.

 

Even as I go through my list of available indie publishers, I'm looking at traditional publishing as being a long shot.  I have maybe five out of twenty where I have a chance.

 

But I 100% agree with you: Speculative fiction with a Christian message has a snowball's chance in Perdition of getting published through a Christian publisher.  There are precious few agents that cater to the Christian market, and they don't want Speculative.

 

They've ceded the culture.

Edited by Jeff Potts
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.