Jump to content

Recommended Posts

15 hours ago, Zee said:

I knew I'd created a relatable character when one reader said he was (and I quote) "adorable," and another said he was a sociopath and hoped he died.

Oh, wow! Your poor character. Lol!!

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Zee said:

I knew I'd created a relatable character when one reader said he was (and I quote) "adorable," and another said he was a sociopath and hoped he died.

@Zee Okay, I'm begging you. 😩  Please, please tell me about this character!  I must know!! 😂

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

@Zee Okay, I'm begging you. 😩  Please, please tell me about this character!  I must know!! 😂

 

1 hour ago, suspensewriter said:

Yeah, now @Grey_Skies has got me guessing!  Which one is it?!

 

The character was Boris, the second protagonist in my most recent story. I did not set out to make him a sociopath, and I certainly didn't plan on him being adorable. He was just supposed to be a guy. More or less likable. Not especially intelligent. Prone to making rash decisions.

 

It's really fascinating how, as a writer, I can give maybe a dozen or so pieces to a fifty-piece puzzle, and readers have no problem filling in all the holes, sometimes in completely different ways...

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The most relatable characters are, imho, real. As an avid reader, I was aware that some authors seemed to people their stories with characters who seemed like real people (and I enjoyed their stories), while others seemed to write, um.... rather wooden, unrealistic characters. When I started trying to write, surprise, surprise, I found cardboard characters in my stories. I'd stand them up in a contrived situation, put words in their mouths, and.... it fell flat. I was certain I'd never be able to write a readable story. But one day, I'd decided that a certain happening should come next in my pitiful narrative, and I decided what Aodh MacLachlainn would say. He stopped what he was doing, turned and glared at me and refused to say those words I'd chosen for him. He became real. And let me tell you, it scared me to death. I was afraid to tell anyone, but finally called my sister to admit to her that I'd lost my mind. She said, "Oh, it's nothing to worry about. Lots of writers say their characters take over and run things." And since that time, my characters, one by one, have become real. And if they aren't, I can't write. What happens is, I lay aside my preconceived notions, put the characters in a certain scene, sit back, watch what they do, and write it down. It's the only way I can write. It's more like my characters write the story, and I transcribe it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.