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On 4/2/2021 at 10:53 AM, Zee said:

Ok, that makes sense...my sister in-law, who is married to a Latino guy, explained it once, but my brain didn’t fully retain it...

 

My sister is married to a Congolese guy, and in their culture, a wife generally takes her husband’s surname (possibly due to French influences?) but parents will sometimes combine their first names to coin a new name for their child. For example, a guy named Jean married to a woman named Rochelle may call their daughter Jenichelle, or something like that.

Ohh that's kinda cute. It's like creating a new family name/legacy with a combination of both husband and wife. I love that. 

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1 minute ago, Kells said:

Ok so let's say she is born Rodriguez-Suarrez, and she marries a Sanchez, she'll be Rodriguez-Suarrez de Sanchez? Am I understanding that correctly?

I believe they say Rodriguez y Suarez, rather than using the dash. “Y”, pronounced “eee”, is the Spanish word for “and”. So Rodriguez y Suarez de Sanchez. @carolinamtnecorrect me if I’m wrong! 

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On 4/3/2021 at 10:20 AM, Kells said:

Ok so let's say she is born Rodriguez-Suarrez, and she marries a Sanchez, she'll be Rodriguez-Suarrez de Sanchez? Am I understanding that correctly?

Yes. Her children will be Rodriguez-Sanchez.

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On 4/3/2021 at 10:23 AM, PenName said:

I believe they say Rodriguez y Suarez, rather than using the dash. “Y”, pronounced “eee”, is the Spanish word for “and”. So Rodriguez y Suarez de Sanchez. @carolinamtnecorrect me if I’m wrong! 

Oops! You are correct. Thank you for the correction.

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On 4/2/2021 at 2:01 AM, Zee said:

In Latino culture, the wife’s and husband’s names are often combined with a hyphen...but I think a daughter would retain only her father’s after marriage (not 100% sure about that.)

Yes -- the daughter of P. Padre and M. Madre would be D. Padre-Madre. When she marries, she drops her mother's last name and replaces it with her husband's, making her D. Padre-Esposo. Her children, however, will have their father's last name first, as she did before marriage, resulting in N. Esposo-Padre. So the order of her children's last names will be reversed from hers, at least in the (Latin American) Spanish-speaking countries I'm familiar with.

 

The system is a bit ungainly, but does serve to identify the children as belonging to both families, which makes some things easier. It's also pretty much law in some Spanish-speaking countries, unlike in the West.

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