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...worked with deaf children or is deaf themselves? I'm working on another story (yet again) about a young girl who's profoundly deaf but wants to learn how to play the piano because music is her passion. I've been thrown into a whole new world after watching The Silent Child (great short film by the way). I'll take all the help I can get on this!

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Could she hear before and loved music? Or has she always been deaf? If always, what is it about music that draws her to it? Can't be the music itself. Perhaps she can feel the vibrations? Otherwise, there is no reason for her to want to learn to play, because she can't tell what she is playing.

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You all brought up good points... Might need to put in some backstory or something. I was thinking along the lines that she'd be learning music just so that she could prove others wrong in what they're telling her (I.e. she can't play because she's deaf).

But I'll take what you've mentioned in consideration. ☺

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1 hour ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

You all brought up good points... Might need to put in some backstory or something. I was thinking along the lines that she'd be learning music just so that she could prove others wrong in what they're telling her (I.e. she can't play because she's deaf).

 

Sounds like her motivation may be more to prove the naysayers wrong than from a particular love of music, then. Not that there’s anything wrong with that—actually I think it makes more sense, because I can’t imagine being deaf from birth, and still loving music for its own sake.

 

But if you want her to live music, what if instead of piano, she decides she wants to be a drummer, or a dancer? I think both of those activities would still be very challenging for a deaf person, and she’d certainly get her fair share of discouragement, but I think with either of those, she might actually enjoy the activity, as well as proving her determination. 

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@Zee Hmm.. Good options there! I did put into the second chapter where she mentions that she grew a love for piano at a young age before an incident happened that caused her to lose her hearing, but I kind of like the ballet one better...

So many ideas. 😂

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7 hours ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

@Zee Hmm.. Good options there! I did put into the second chapter where she mentions that she grew a love for piano at a young age before an incident happened that caused her to lose her hearing, but I kind of like the ballet one better...

So many ideas. 😂

 

On the down side, so many paths we'll never get to explore...

 

On the up side, so many paths...

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1 hour ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

@Wes B Yes, honestly, yes. There's so many that could go along with just one person but then the possibility of potentially using it for a new story...

Le sigh.

Absolutely. I may have mentioned it before (gettin' too old to remember what I've said to everybody...) but keep a notebook of all your ideas, random thoughts, memory joggers, and things that might serve as future writing prompts, and review it regularly. Keep all those thoughts as fresh in your mind as you can.. That's where a lot of those "unexpected turns" will come from...

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55 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

Another suggestion, @Ky_GirlatHeart.  What if her parents by her a light box to go along with her instrument so she can "see" the music.

 

Now, that's a neat idea! If the covers were also removed from the loudspeaker enclosures, so she could put her hands directly on the speaker cones, she'd also feel intense vibrations through her fingertips. The light, along with the physical sensation would be a surreal, almost alien way to experience music. It might take some research and actual experimenting with the stuff to be able to write credibly about it, but it could produce an experience that no reader will ever have imagined before. While the book might be aimed at a far younger audience, I would probably read it...

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Mandy Harvey is an amazing deaf singer/songwriter who went viral for her audition and success on America's Got Talent. Here's her audition and story in one video. I hope it helps!

 

 

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Not with deafness, but what we perceive as handicapped.  Had a blind and physically-different acquaintance who took offense as being called 'handicapped'.  He insisted it was normal for him and to quit trying to 'help' him do stuff.  His philosophy was 'I'm normal and so are you!  Just be my friend.'  I gave him a carved and sanded poplar walking stick with a Bible passage in Braille, with a bunch of butterflies on it.  (He loved his butterflies!)  He showed me there are many ways to appreciate God's creation.  When he picked up the stick, he held it to his ear and tapped one of his long, thick fingers (2 on each hand and a thumb) and listened.  He smiled big and said, "This wood sounds BEAUTIFUL!" 

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15 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

What if her parents by her a light box to go along with her instrument so she can "see" the music.

I've never heard of a light box before! Might need to do some research on that when I get the chance. 😄 Sounds cool!

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14 hours ago, Wes B said:

While the book might be aimed at a far younger audience, I would probably read it...

I have no idea who I'm trying to aim my writings to, really. I feel like I speak or write a bit more maturely than most teens my age, so I have no idea.

Then again, very few people have read a lot of my writings. I can't say for sure. 😛

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15 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

What if her parents by her a light box to go along with her instrument so she can "see" the music.

How much light can a blind person see? It's not like just closing your eyes. The connection from the eyes to the brain doesn't work.

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