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Alternatives to e-mail lists and newsletters


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I'm not 100% if this is the right place to post this, but feel free to move it if it's not.

 

I'm hearing that websites with e-mail lists and newsletters are on the way out.  Not sure if this is true, but one thing is for sure: having an author's website is sort of like being on a raft out in the middle of the ocean.  Unless it is attached to something that directs you to the website (social media or having a book), no one is going to stumble over your site.  You've got to lead people there, first and foremost, before they sign up to be on an e-mail list.

 

I know some authors go the Patreon route, where people donate money for whatever service you have, and in return get some additional benefit.  However, with recent events with Patreon and politicization of the site, some people are concerned that this may not be a route to go.  Plus, if people pay for you to be a writer, there is an expectation that the patrons get something in return, namely free content on a periodic basis.

 

Then there is the Locals service.  Locals is a community where you can set up a subscription service, very much like YouTube, post videos, put up content for subscribers.  In many ways it is like a cross between YouTube, a blog, and Patreon.  People can subscribe, become paid members, and so on.  And they can get e-mail updates, although not newsletters per se.

 

I am personally considering dropping my website, and going the Locals route.  Part of my problem is that I want to provide content for people who sign up for my e-mail list.  While I can do this with Wix, locals almost has this capacity built in.

 

Has anyone looked into these?  Thoughts?  Comments?

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3 hours ago, Jeff Potts said:

I'm not 100% if this is the right place to post this, but feel free to move it if it's not.

 

I'm hearing that websites with e-mail lists and newsletters are on the way out.  Not sure if this is true, but one thing is for sure: having an author's website is sort of like being on a raft out in the middle of the ocean.  Unless it is attached to something that directs you to the website (social media or having a book), no one is going to stumble over your site.  You've got to lead people there, first and foremost, before they sign up to be on an e-mail list.

 

I know some authors go the Patreon route, where people donate money for whatever service you have, and in return get some additional benefit.  However, with recent events with Patreon and politicization of the site, some people are concerned that this may not be a route to go.  Plus, if people pay for you to be a writer, there is an expectation that the patrons get something in return, namely free content on a periodic basis.

 

Then there is the Locals service.  Locals is a community where you can set up a subscription service, very much like YouTube, post videos, put up content for subscribers.  In many ways it is like a cross between YouTube, a blog, and Patreon.  People can subscribe, become paid members, and so on.  And they can get e-mail updates, although not newsletters per se.

 

I am personally considering dropping my website, and going the Locals route.  Part of my problem is that I want to provide content for people who sign up for my e-mail list.  While I can do this with Wix, locals almost has this capacity built in.

 

Has anyone looked into these?  Thoughts?  Comments?

I have not looked or heard anything about this, would be nice to find out more about it though

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15 minutes ago, lynnmosher said:

Really? Do you have any links? I couldn't find anything.

Here is one: 

https://smartblogger.com/create-a-newsletter/

 

I've seen a couple of others out there.

 

I, personally, am somewhat mixed on the notion of a newsletter.  After what we saw when the Social Media Cartel shut down Parler, having your own site and your own e-mail lists seems like a sound idea.  But, driving people to that website is going to be difficult, especially if you spread yourself across multiple social media platforms.  And, with sites like Wix, it's an extra charge to get the appropriate features to set up subscriber content.

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1 hour ago, Jeff Potts said:

Here is one: 

<link deleted, just because i can...>

 

I've seen a couple of others out there.

 

You might want to approach this site and this character with caution. By all means, check him out, but remember the adage about when things are too good to be true.

 

To start with, there's nothing wrong with building a sales funnel, and this site is a small part of a massive such funnel. Some writers platforms may emulate a smaller-scale funnel, and in that respect, the site is worth studying for examples. But that site, its widespread promotion, and even a large number of glowing online "reviews", which all sound suspiciously alike and resemble sales pitches, all point toward selling his courses that cost hundreds, or even thousands of dollars.

 

You'll notice that the article offers no real plan for success. (That will cost you!) The author just brags that he's successful, claims that everything you're doing is wrong, and offers largely unsubstantiated claims as to why. It distracts from this by tossing in lots of true-but-irrelevant statements, like the fact that some people don't use RSS feeds wisely, as if that mattered.

 

It is inviting to be told that all the hard work is unnecessary, that there's a much easier way (somehow, he forgot to tell us just what that is...) and that he's gonna take good care of us. I can just feel myself being drawn into the funnel. Still, that article is a thinly disguised sales pitch, that will funnel some of its readers into paying big bucks for his supposed answers.

 

Read all you want from his site; there's some useful info there. The very top level of a sales funnel involves giving away something useful, for free. But as you do, resolve ahead of time that you will not purchase anything.  His free webinar apparently doesn't give much in the way of useful info either, but the sales pitch will become more apparent. Purchasing some low priced item is the next level in a standard funnel; stop before you reach that.

Edited by Wes B
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Hey... SW... That's an absolutely dynamite article...

 

I wish I'd had it 30 years ago. I remember sending emails at work, asking several questions in the one email, and all kinds of people consistently answering only the first one. It took a while to realize people were only skimming their emails, and that I had to put questions in a numbered list. There were a lot more things i never figured out, but which are in the article.

 

I'm sure there's still lots more to dig out of there but i don't know for sure, 'cuz I just skimmed it...  😀😀😀

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