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When they get to the other of the two cities, you'll want to switch that accent to French...

The Way of Kings, the Emotional Thesaurus, and my own of course. Yay, for editing.

A really good book my sister wrote. ūüôā¬†

    The book I have just begun reading is the Bible.  Please don't get the wrong idea.  I have read it before.  It's just been much too long since the last time.

    What I've been doing instead is reading from the devotional booklet "Our Daily Bread", while having breakfast.  I find it very helpful, but it presents what the writer has to say about the passage he or she has quoted.  I believe I should read the biblical passages for myself, and see how to apply them to myself.

    As of now, I'm not reading straight from Genesis 1:1 to Revelation 22:21.  I've done that before.  A few chapters every morning, before I left for work.  I haven't done that for a very long time. 

    Now I've started by reading the entire Gospel of Luke, over the past three days.  Today, I've begun reading his second contribution to the Bible:  The Book of Acts, chapters 1 & 2, so far.

   After I've completed Acts, I probably will start reading Genesis, "In the beginning..."

Edited by William D'Andrea
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I'm currently reading books about writing and books for classes I'm taking from Wheaton College's Prison Ministry Institute. I usually read nonfiction, but the next time I read fiction I was thinking some classic Sci-Fi like The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress.

 

RE: To Kill a Mockingbird, I'm from Alabama and they don't let you grow up here without reading it. It really does live up to the hype though, as does the 1962 film. 

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On 2/9/2021 at 9:36 PM, Kazaza said:

. Why is that? I started a few books before I settled on To Kill a Mockingbird. For me, the first paragraphs didn't grab me enough to warrant me taking time away from my novel. 

Yeah I get that.

May I suggest you try again?

 

I'm not sure what generation you are part of, so please forgive me if I'm off base, but do bear in mind that novels of yesteryear were not written with the "grab them by the throat at the start" mentality authors have today. 

 

It took me twice to really get into The Last of the Mohicans, and I'm glad I tried again.

 

That said, there are just some books that are tough for some readers to enjoy.

I tried to read Moby Dick a couple times...could not get past the first chapter to save my life.

 

In short,To Kill a Mockingbird is worth another shot, but no judgement here if it's just not your cup of tea.

 

 

Edited by RockyMtn Gal
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Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clarke for a book club. Other than 2001: A Space Odyssey, I've only read essays by this author. 

 

I developed a habit of "blitz reading" fiction. With the Kindle and Audible apps I can listen when I  can't read and read when I can't listen.

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Guest SelinasBonfire

The Collected Letters of C S Lewis, Volume III. A big, big book.

 

Also dipping into two old favorites: The Enchanted Places by Christopher Milne, and String Too Short To Be Saved by Donald Hall. These two memoirs, though very different from each other, have inspired me in my own memoir writing.

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Everyone's been having a literary/philosophical discussion on To Kill a Mockingbird, and I missed the party! ūüėā

 

I love the story.¬† The movie is one of my favorites, but I'll admit I'm also a sucker for Gregory Peck.¬† I embarrassingly admit that I have yet to read the book, though I have tried about two or three times to get I to it.¬† And yet I still love the story!¬† I honestly think part of my difficulty in reading the book is that I don't have a good copy.¬† The one I have is an old paperback from the basement, that makes me feel like it's gonna fall apart if I try to read it for too long.¬† But one day, I shall read it!¬† And what @Wes B¬†said about the sequel...really intrigued me and mad me want to read it even more!¬† Might I ask, is Atticus Finch not the wonderful man we all thought he was?¬† ūüėĮ

 

 

Side from all that, I'm reading A Swiftly Tilting Planet, by Madeline L'Engle, and The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson.  Both are intriguing!

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I'm into Acts in a Wycliffe Bible --Wow, that Middle English is a trip sometimes.  Also trying to finish O.E.Rolvaag's "Giants in the Earth".  It's a tale of Norwegian pioneers in the Dakotas.  I'm reading it for the reference to the 1873-5 locust plague.  Last major plague in the Americas, biggest in recorded history (except for Exodus), and it hit the area where I live, affording our locals to throw a locust feast.  Those locusts (different critter from cicadas) have since gone extinct in N.America.

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9 minutes ago, Paul but not THE said:

I'm into Acts in a Wycliffe Bible --Wow, that Middle English is a trip sometimes.  

Have you ever read from Young's Literal Translation? That will give you a new respect for our translators. 

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9 minutes ago, Paul but not THE said:

Sounds like one to check out.  I don't think I'd heard of that one.

It's a word-for-word literal translation. It is incredibly difficult to read, but it gives some insight into exactly what the original word usage looked like. And it highlights just how much interpretation goes into our modern translations. 

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3 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

I love the story.¬† The movie is one of my favorites, but I'll admit I'm also a sucker for Gregory Peck.¬† I embarrassingly admit that I have yet to read the book, though I have tried about two or three times to get I to it.¬† And yet I still love the story!¬† I honestly think part of my difficulty in reading the book is that I don't have a good copy.¬† The one I have is an old paperback from the basement, that makes me feel like it's gonna fall apart if I try to read it for too long.¬† But one day, I shall read it!¬† And what @Wes B¬†said about the sequel...really intrigued me and mad me want to read it even more!¬† Might I ask, is Atticus Finch not the wonderful man we all thought he was?¬† ūüėĮ

 

This piece of the discussion is fascinating! To start with, you are the second of our young people here to show more interest in the sequel than the original book. Understand that your reaction is the exact opposite among the older readers, many of whom were aghast at the premise of Go Set A Watchman. What this suggests to me is that the author was deeply in tune with what her new audience would want to read about. That's truly visionary!

 

Without giving anything away, we have Scout, now grown up, coming "home" for a vacation from her work in New York. One thing experienced by everybody -- and I mean everybody -- who moves away from their birthplace, is the surprises that happen when they return "home." Not only will things change, but the things that didn't will still not be as we've remembered. As we mature, we become a little smarter, a little wiser, and a little more perceptive. It's a normal part of growing up, and it's good, because otherwise we would have stopped growing, which is the worst thing we could have done.

 

I think you're coming at the book with "the right attitude," and what you find there will be worthwhile.

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Guest kiwigummy
4 hours ago, Grey_Skies said:

Everyone's been having a literary/philosophical discussion on To Kill a Mockingbird, and I missed the party!

 

I read the sequel. I give it negative 3 stars out of five...

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20 hours ago, Wes B said:

I think you're coming at the book with "the right attitude," and what you find there will be worthwhile.

Thank you so much for the further information!  I appreciate your taking the time to explain, and I look forward with great interest to reading both books.  Out of curiosity, would you say Go Set a Watchman is age-appropriate for teens?

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1 hour ago, Grey_Skies said:

Thank you so much for the further information!  I appreciate your taking the time to explain, and I look forward with great interest to reading both books.  Out of curiosity, would you say Go Set a Watchman is age-appropriate for teens?

 

I would think so, and after seeing some teen responses here to the description, I might go so far as to suspect it's aimed to give some advice to teens. In some ways, it might be about dealing with unexpected changes as we grow up. This is something we all experience, and it's probably better to see it coming, rather than just recognize it in the rear-view mirror after we've run over it...

 

I notice from some discussions here that there are even adults who are averse to cuss words, and I totally understand this. If these make you uncomfortable, you'd have to decide whether the occasional salty saying won't work for you. They are not vomited voluminously like in common trash talk, but sprinkled sparsely, to provide color and reality among the kinds of people we're watching.

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Thanks, @Wes B!  From what you said, I would be happy to give it a read.  I don't necessarily approve of using cuss words, (and don't use them myself) but I do read some books and watch some movies with them.  While I don't like them, as long as they are not rampant throughout, I'm okay.  From what you said, it sounds like they are used very judiciously.  Plus, my parents are of the same mind and know that I don't talk like that, and they know exposure to that kind of language is inevitable.  When I was younger, and I came across a cuss in a book, I would mentally substitute a "clean" word instead though I don't do that as much now that I'm a bit older.  Anyway, thanks again for your time, and now that my library is open again, I'll be looking for the sequel once I get through the first one!

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Now that I finished my book club obligations, I'm re-reading Oxygen, a hard science fiction novel, in preparation for the launch of a Christian science fiction book club in March. The jury is still out as to whether I choose Madeline L'Engle or CS Lewis as the "classic" selection. (I'll probably post a poll here and on other social media sites.)

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In another thread, we were asked the question, " What is the most memorable first line of a novel for you?" I think that was how it was headed.¬† I responded with Charles Dickens' "√Źt was the best of times; it was the worst of times." I decided I needed to read the book, A Tale of Two Cities. I orderd it.¬†

 

It is written in the style of Dickens' time.(19th Century), the print is small.  I try to read it before I go to bed, Therefore it is rather slow going. Last night, I couldn't sleep. I watched a recorded TV show and decided to read some more of it, 

 

I found myself reading it in the British language. Accent and all went through my mind.  I found this interesting since the story takes place in the late 18th Century.I

 

I have often thought that I was born too late. It seems my tastes in stories could be telling me something.

 

 

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43 minutes ago, quietspirit said:

I found myself reading it in the British language. Accent and all went through my mind.  I found this interesting since the story takes place in the late 18th Century.I

 

When they get to the other of the two cities, you'll want to switch that accent to French...

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I am almost finished with The Way of Imagination by Scott Russell Sanders. Essays on nature and spirituality.  He quotes a Japanese poet called Kobayashi Issa. He is a Buddhist, but wrote the following haiku:

 

The world of dew

in the world of dew

and yet, and yet‚ÄĒ

 

The pause is doubt raised in the poet's mind. As a Buddist he believe all is nature, but when he lost his child, his allegiance was shifting to belief in God. Hence, the final line: 'the and yet, and yet‚ÄĒ'

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