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When they get to the other of the two cities, you'll want to switch that accent to French...

The Way of Kings, the Emotional Thesaurus, and my own of course. Yay, for editing.

A really good book my sister wrote. ūüôā¬†

6 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

I have a couple other books, but I can't seem to stay with them.

OK. Why is that? I started a few books before I settled on To Kill a Mockingbird. For me, the first paragraphs didn't grab me enough to warrant me taking time away from my novel. 

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For those if you reading books that have been made into movies, have you watched the movies? If yes, was that factor in your decision to read said book drive? If you haven't watched it, do you plan on watching the movies after you read the book?

 

I've been apart of numerous discussions where people have said the books are way better than the movies, in my case I agree. If I read the book first I'll watch the movie but I won't vice versa, because I feel like it's spoiled it for me; I'll be seeing the characters in the movie the whole time. ūüėÖ

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17 minutes ago, Sarah Daffy said:

Yes, but I mainly write in other genres.

OK. Will you publish the various genres under pseudonyms? I read something about readers getting confused and disappointed if they're used to an author writing one genre only to pick up a book and it's another.

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1 minute ago, Kazaza said:

OK. Will you publish the various genres under pseudonyms? I read something about readers getting confused and disappointed if they're used to an author writing one genre only to pick up a book and it's another.

I'd probably publish them all under one name. What I meant was that the book my sister wrote was one of the genres I (sometimes) write.

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Guest kiwigummy

I’m afraid if you don’t finish To Kill a Mockingbird, you might have to watch the movie adaptation starring Gregory Peck. I can’t fathom a person who doesn’t know the story. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1960. 

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4 minutes ago, kiwigummy said:

I can’t fathom a person who doesn’t know the story. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1960. 

ūüėā that's quite funny. Winning the Pulitzer Prize doesn't mean everyone should know the story.

 

I doubt I'll watch the movie either. Not saying never but I'm not jumping on the sadness train at present, if it's to do with death. Does someone die?

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11 hours ago, Wes B said:

Flowers for Algernon was made into a movie back in the 1960's.

I didn't know that, but I saw one came out around 2000.

 

11 hours ago, Wes B said:

If you stop and think about what you're seeing in the final freeze-frame, it might just bring out the philosopher in you...

It did. I'm probably overanalyzing it at this point. 

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35 minutes ago, TD Todd said:

I didn't know that, but I saw one came out around 2000.

 

It did. I'm probably overanalyzing it at this point. 

 

I'm talking about the 1960's movie. While we'll regularly talk about how much better an author can do telling a story than a movie producer a=can -- and we're most often right -- there are those places where a good director can use the visual medium to produce effects that we'd find difficult or impossible.

 

The final scene of the movie Charly simply shows him riding on a swing. IIRC, there may be music for effect, but in our minds, it's effectively silent. He's not just swinging a little; he's riding high, eyes squeezed shut, mouth open in sheer joy. At the height of an upswing, the movie freeze-frames, and that's the end. It's just a few seconds long, and is a departure from the story, which ends on a completely down-note.

 

It's just the tiniest addition, and the movie still ends on a down note, fer sure. Yet in just a few seconds, the thoughtful viewer is slapped by a question that a writer might not be able to throw out to a reader, without lots & lots of verbiage that would bog the ending down.

 

In story and movie, Charly understands he's lost a great deal, and deeply misses Algernon. In both, he has no real understanding of just how much he's lost. In the movie, we see  him in one moment of wild, deliriously happy abandon. We are depressed. Charly is thrilled. Riddle me this, Batman, who's right?

 

Well, clearly we're right, 'cuz we see reality. But how much does that matter? Charly is happy; we're not, and may not have been that wildly happy for a long time. Are we really better off, for all our understanding? It's a tired old saw that life is more about how we respond to it than what actually happens to us, but that one still scene hits us, hard.

 

Yes, they added something, but I think it was an important something. To those viewers who just wanted to see the original story, it was right there, and the impact of that final scene would go right over their heads. But a good director can sometimes add some special treats for the careful viewer, and i think this one worked.

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18 hours ago, Kazaza said:

I'm currently reading To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and I'm not sure about it just yet. I liked the opening paragraph but it felt like it digressed a bit after, with a lot of narrative exposition that lost me. I'll keep reading though.

 

So, what are you reading? And, if it's not to do with the craft, do you think it takes away from the time you could be writing?

Great question!  I am one of those crazy people.  I read several books at one time.  So I am reading alot.  I do not think it takes away from writing because I try to balance it.  I read a couple of pages before I wrote this morning.  

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19 hours ago, Kazaza said:

I'm currently reading To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and I'm not sure about it just yet. I liked the opening paragraph but it felt like it digressed a bit after, with a lot of narrative exposition that lost me. I'll keep reading though.

 

 

You know... if you're just in the first few pages, that book begins with a lengthy stream-of-consciousness reminiscence about the story to come. It makes very little sense 'till you've read the rest of the book. If you try to understand it, it will overwhelm you in disconnected details. It's just supposed to give a vague impression of all the Good Stuff that's about to happen.

 

I remember my daughter coming to me in tears with the book, back when she was in high school. She couldn't understand it, and didn't know what to do. I explained that she could safely skip over the first x pages, and where she could safely start the story. She went happily on, without a problem...

 

This is an interesting book, in that the author wrote a sequel decades later, that durn near gave coronaries to half of her fans. Without spoiling anything, I'll just point out that this story's POV is of a young girl who idolizes her father, and sees him as someone who can do no wrong. To many readers, he's become a saintly hero, but unbeknownst to us, the first book has an unreliable narrator.

 

The sequel is still from the point of view of the young girl. She's simply become an adult, and sees her father as he really is (probably...) It's a study in how our understanding may change as we mature and learn more about the real world. If you like heroes more than lessons about real life, skip the sequel. You have been warned...

 

 

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Guest kiwigummy

I read Go Set a Watchman and I thought it was not good. Technically, it’s a prequel sequel because it was written before TKAM but deemed not good enough.

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Hi @Kazaza, I have to second @kiwigummy‚Äės recommendation of To Kill a Mockingbird. It‚Äôs tragic, yes, but also one of the most atmospheric and beautiful books I‚Äôve ever read. Probably helps to have grown up in the American South, though...

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4 hours ago, Wes B said:

 

You know... if you're just in the first few pages, that book begins with a lengthy stream-of-consciousness reminiscence about the story to come. It makes very little sense 'till you've read the rest of the book. If you try to understand it, it will overwhelm you in disconnected details. It's just supposed to give a vague impression of all the Good Stuff that's about to happen.

 

I remember my daughter coming to me in tears with the book, back when she was in high school. She couldn't understand it, and didn't know what to do. I explained that she could safely skip over the first x pages, and where she could safely start the story. She went happily on, without a problem...

 

This is an interesting book, in that the author wrote a sequel decades later, that durn near gave coronaries to half of her fans. Without spoiling anything, I'll just point out that this story's POV is of a young girl who idolizes her father, and sees him as someone who can do no wrong. To many readers, he's become a saintly hero, but unbeknownst to us, the first book has an unreliable narrator.

 

The sequel is still from the point of view of the young girl. She's simply become an adult, and sees her father as he really is (probably...) It's a study in how our understanding may change as we mature and learn more about the real world. If you like heroes more than lessons about real life, skip the sequel. You have been warned...

 

 

Thanks for this, Wes B! I'll rethink reading it; I especially like the sound of¬†the sequel. ūüĎć

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4 hours ago, Zee said:

Hi @Kazaza, I have to second @kiwigummy‚Äės recommendation of To Kill a Mockingbird. It‚Äôs tragic, yes, but also one of the most atmospheric and beautiful books I‚Äôve ever read. Probably helps to have grown up in the American South, though...

Thanks for your view of the book, Zee. You make it sound like a good read. ūüĎć

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8 minutes ago, Kazaza said:

Thanks for this, Wes B! I'll rethink reading it; I especially like the sound of¬†the sequel. ūüĎć

 

Good plan!!! Seriously... the first.. I dunno, the first few pages are this dreamy stream of consciousness stuff, that will probably appeal to some, but totally confuse the rest. Many will consider it the least successful part of the story, but it makes up for it...

 

Just skip to the first break, at... lessee... where it says, "Maycomb was an old town," and start from there. After finishing the story, you can go back to the bit at the beginning, and what the author was trying to do will become obvious. Stream of consciousness was once a much more popular technique than it is today, I think. Maybe for good reason...

 

Fun trivia: While I mostly write nonfiction, I also write short speeches which I deliver at Toastmasters. I occasionally do humor, and I've got a piece in progress that's a Tall Tale featuring one character whom I've named Tequila. Tequila Mockingbird. We'll see how that one pans out...

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33 minutes ago, Kazaza said:

 comment to do with "fathom a person" and the Pulitzer prize. A ton of books have won the prize but I'm sure the majority haven't read them all... It's all to do with what readers find enjoyable. 

 

You absolutely want your reading to be enjoyable, and as a writer, you may wish to demand even more. I've only read a handful of Pulitzer winners, but each was absolutely earth-shattering. To Kill A Mockingbird was one, of course, and it's a classic. Another true classic is The Old man And the Sea, about grit, determination, loss of honor, and a wonderfully surprising redemption, in the very final words. Amazing and not to be missed.

 

Tales of the South Pacific was Michener's first novel (!!!) and besides being an excellent read, shows a fascinating technique, wherein a bunch of short stories gradually meld into a complete whole, as the minor, or even peripheral characters in one story turn out to be main characters in another story. If you're familiar with Broadway musicals, the play South Pacific was based on this book.

 

My all time favorite book, which I've ranted on here before is The Caine Mutiny. This book attempts almost everything, does all of it really well, and you will not see any character at the end of the story in the same way as you saw them at the start. Just brilliant.

 

All are Pulitzer winners, all are definitely worth your time, all will teach a lot about plotting and writing, and all are heartily recommended.

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41 minutes ago, Wes B said:

Just skip to the first break, at... lessee... where it says, "Maycomb was an old town," and start from there. After finishing the story, you can go back to the bit at the beginning, and what the author was trying to do will become obvious.

Thanks, Wes B. I'll do that. ūüĎć

 

11 minutes ago, Wes B said:

I've only read a handful of Pulitzer winners, but each was absolutely earth-shattering. To Kill A Mockingbird was one, of course, and it's a classic. 

All are Pulitzer winners, all are definitely worth your time, all will teach a lot about plotting and writing, and all are heartily recommended.

I deleted that comment ūüėĄ, but thanks, I'll bare that in mind. ūüĎć

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