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During English class, a random named popped into my head: Sara Kleichman. That name led to a whole new plot for a Jewish girl tormented in the Nazi camps who meets Sara and learns how she is able to forgive and love her enemies even if she's only a young person like her (I don't have a name for the main character yet).

Do you guys have any suggestions on where to get information on the concentration camps and such? I found a couple of books, but I didn't get a whole bunch of them since my library is only offering curbside service and they don't check out the books you return right away since they have to quarantine them... ūüėē

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Sarah D's suggestion will bring you tons of results. Be warned that this setting is extraordinarily dark and brutal, and you may have a tough time presenting any "light" version of it, without being perceived as trying to make light of an unspeakable human tragedy.

 

It's your story, and if you want to tackle it, then that's great. You might be able to tell the same story yet with a LOT more flexibility if you go back in time another century or two, though. See, the poor Jewish people suffered no end of persecution, whenever and wherever they settled in Europe. If you google the word shtetl, which is Yiddish for town, you'll get tons of info on what life was like for a severely persecuted people that occasionally had some more stable times (like you might remember from things like Fiddler on the Roof) all the way to terrible, wild, screaming mobs (google the word pogroms).

 

Note that the shtetl is often used more for Polish than German settings, but learning of life in one place will give a reasonably close picture of life in that time and geographic area. It will set you on the right track, and back then, in that general area, poor people petty much had no options and lived pretty much alike.

 

With this setting change, you have a dozen times the flexibility, just in case your story needs both stable times and terror, and you have the option to switch from one to the other, without warning.

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   There are an infinite number of books considering the Nazi Holocaust.  There are also some movies.

    I'd like to suggest you read the non-fiction "Diary of Ann Frank", which was a major best seller in the 1950's and later made into a very successful movie.

   There is also the movie "Judgement at Nuremberg" which was produced in 1961.

   

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49 minutes ago, William D'Andrea said:

   There are an infinite number of books considering the Nazi Holocaust.  There are also some movies.

    I'd like to suggest you read the non-fiction "Diary of Ann Frank", which was a major best seller in the 1950's and later made into a very successful movie.

   There is also the movie "Judgement at Nuremberg" which was produced in 1961.

   

Corrie ten Boom's The Hiding Place is another one worth reading.

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One of the most haunting memories of my life is standing at the highest point of the city hall bell tower in Subotica, a Serbian city on the border with Hungary. The city was once part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and we had spent the greater part of the day up until that point exploring the city hall, which was also the former administrative center of the Empire in that area.

 

The bell tower was by far the highest point in the area and we spent some time looking out over the city. At length, the Serbian pastor I was with pointed out a beautiful blue dome rising above the other buildings, a few blocks away. 

 

It was a synagogue, he said, before World War II. Now it's nothing. There aren't any Jewish people. He did not say why, but we can fill in the blanks. 

 

That rocked me. There still aren't any Jewish people there.

 

World War II and the Holocaust aren't only a thing of the past - they are still deeply impacting the present. I just looked up the numbers. Out of the original Serbian Jewish population of 34,000, only 5,000 survived the murders committed by the Nazis and their Serbian Fascist allies. Today, the Jewish population of Serbia is only around 3,000 people. 

 

I'm only saying this to urge you to approach this important topic with much research - though, as @Wes B mentioned, it will not be pleasant - be prayerful about it and do not overtax your spirit and emotions - and a knowledge that the Holocaust is something still greatly affecting the world to this day. There are many interviews with survivors of concentration camps that are well-worth the watch. 

 

@William D'Andrea has some great suggestions as well. 

Edited by PenName
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