Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have started handwriting the Bible as part of my Bible study.  I have copied down Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs and Jude.  I am working on Lamentations now (although it is kind of depressing).  I'm just curious if any of you do this as well. I know that there are some who journal  and copying the Bible is part of that journal.

 

I find that by copying the Bible, I retain it better as I have a hard time remembering Bible verses.

 

Another reason I copy the Bible down in a notebook is that I believe that a time will come when our Bibles will be endangered and to have a notebook with handwriting in it will not be of interest to those demanding the Bible be destroyed.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to, but writing is very hard for me due to bad hand-eye coordination.

 

As far as memorizing Scripture, about 20 years ago I did a discipleship course called the navigators series and it had a very unique way to teach yourself Scripture even if you had a bad memory. The concept involves writing down the verse or passage on a piece of paper and carrying that around with you. Than reading it aloud to yourself several times a day for the first few days then for the next few days try to speak the verse/passage aloud several times a day without using the paper at all. You would quote the reference, speak the verse/passage then quote the reference again. The idea behind this routine is that by writing, then speaking and listening you involve 3 out of 5 senses and the repetitive nature of reading out loud helps you to remember it not only with your head, but with your heart. And because you are quoting the Bible reference twice, someone quoting just the reference can cause your mind to jump to the associated Scripture passage.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am learning disabled in reading comprehension, even though I taught myself to read at age 4.  IN college, I wrote notes in class and audio taped lecture.  Then the night before the next class, I listened to the tape and re-wrote the notes.  Before a test, I re-wrote all the notes for that section.  I could close my eyes and see the page I wrote, then find the answer I needed.,. Killed a lot of trees but it helped e learn.  Copying things down makes my brain absorb things better since i is a slower process than reading.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can see the whole page after writing it, you have something very special in common with some of the ancient peoples who lived through those scriptural events. That's especially so with Lamentations, which you're copying/learning now.

 

Lamentations was something akin to our modern 9/11 memorials, though a supercharged version of it. It recounted the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians, as well as the horrors of the 18-month siege the city suffered, prior to the city's fall. From way back to ancient times, up through the medieval period, special literary works were memorized and recited before audiences, as most people were illiterate, and no one could afford to own books, anyway. Lamentations was made through-and-through to be memorized and performed. If you know what to look for, you'll feel the rhythm as you copy it out.

 

The verses are mostly laid out in triplets. The third part of the triplet is a point being made with the first two parts of the triplet complementing each other, but usually, if a listener missed either one, the point would still be made. There's a sort of redundancy, because there's no rewind button in a public recitation, yet the first two parts are not exactly the same, so they give more info to the people up-front, who heard all of it.

 

Each chapter has 22 verses, or a multiple of 22. In the original Hebrew, each verse would begin with a different letter of their 22-letter alphabet, progressing in alphabetical order. This may have been a memory aid, for the performer, progressing thru the alphabet, and not leaving any verse out. (For some reason, chapter 5 doesn't have the alphabetical pattern...)

 

We can read scripture, because we own Bibles, but only since the invention of printing was scripture widely experienced as a solitary activity (reading). Before then, it was largely experienced as a community activity, hearing, and sometimes, like with this book, they could hear the rhythm as it progressed. As you copy it out, you might just be able to feel that rhythm, and experience a little of what the ancients felt.

Edited by Wes B
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Barnyardmare said:

I have started handwriting the Bible as part of my Bible study.

I've been doing this as well this year. I started with Psalm 119, 1, 2 and 3 John and now James. I'm not as consistent as I should be because I do it with a group who copies verses every day, and I often fall behind. But it's definitely a good habit.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, EBraten said:

I've been doing this as well this year. I started with Psalm 119,

 

Psalm 119 is another writing that does those tricks with the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. Every 8 verses comprise a mini-psalm, in the first 8, each verse begins with the first letter of their alphabet. In the second 8, they all begin with the second letter, all through the alphabet. While this one won't be noticed in copying the English translation, it would have greatly helped performers (or just those learning to sing the psalm) in memorizing its vast length.

 

Lots of the psalms do this 22-letters trick, called an acrostic poem, but psalm 119 does it spectacularly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Wes B said:

 

Psalm 119 is another writing that does those tricks with the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. Every 8 verses comprise a mini-psalm, in the first 8, each verse begins with the first letter of their alphabet. In the second 8, they all begin with the second letter, all through the alphabet. While this one won't be noticed in copying the English translation, it would have greatly helped performers (or just those learning to sing the psalm) in memorizing its vast length.

 

Lots of the psalms do this 22-letters trick, called an acrostic poem, but psalm 119 does it spectacularly.

I did know about the alphabet thing.  T he rhythm thing is there, I noticed in how each verse is longer or shorter but didn't recognize it for the rhythm itself.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Barnyardmare said:

I did know about the alphabet thing.  T he rhythm thing is there, I noticed in how each verse is longer or shorter but didn't recognize it for the rhythm itself.

 

It's pretty interesting how they wrote to be heard and to be memorized. One thing that almost always gets translated out are puns, which are peppered throughout the Old Testament, and which we have at least one example coming from Jesus. Unlike our modern puns though, they weren't intended as wisecracks, but as attention-getters when something really important was being said. People listening to a long recitation might have their minds wandering around, and the wordplay was a way to sort of speak in a bold font...

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2020 at 9:38 AM, Barnyardmare said:

I have started handwriting the Bible as part of my Bible study.  I have copied down Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs and Jude.  I am working on Lamentations now (although it is kind of depressing).  I'm just curious if any of you do this as well. I know that there are some who journal  and copying the Bible is part of that journal.

 

I find that by copying the Bible, I retain it better as I have a hard time remembering Bible verses.

 

Another reason I copy the Bible down in a notebook is that I believe that a time will come when our Bibles will be endangered and to have a notebook with handwriting in it will not be of interest to those demanding the Bible be destroyed.

I have never heard of this, but love the idea!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.