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I think we need more information. Is it supposed to be a magical disappearance, or more like a kidnapping? Is the country where Minnie lives also fictional and/or magical?

 

And I have to say, if Minnie's only six years old, unless she has older people helping her, she's likely to focus her energy (consciously or subconsciously) on adapting to/surviving in her new environment rather than trying to get home. For a while she'll hope that Daddy (or Grandma, or whoever) will come to get her, but then she'll gradually forget...

 

I wonder if this idea might not work better with an older child, maybe a young teenager?

 

 

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@Zee Fair point. I'd say more of the lines of a magical disappearance, if you'd like to call it that. A strange creature called a percock takes her to his world, but I guess I'll need some backstory for that. It's a bit like Alice when she saw the rabbit and tried following it but then ended up falling down a winding hole and found herself in another world. Of course, that was all a dream.

Thanks for that!

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1 hour ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

I'm going to do a fictional story about a young five or six year old girl named Minnie who gets swooped off into a fictional land and has to figure out how to leave before getting permanently stuck there, but I need a good land name.

Anyone have any ideas?

 

I had the same problem.  I just skipped naming it something.  It makes more sense for an "adult" work, because people who live in a world generally call it "the world," or "earth."

 

Maybe if you gave a few more details?  That might help.  What's the point of the story aside from the possibility of being trapped there forever? 

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I love naming things. Since the girl's name is Minnie, I am thinking of words that mean "Maximum" - extreme, paramount, uttermost.

 

- Texmerity (anagram of extremity)

- Umontrapa (anagram of paramount, but suggests "mountain trap")

- Suttremot (anagram of uttermost)

- Plecanni (anagram of pinnacle)

- Mixmaal (anagram of maximal)

- Shum (acronym for Super Hyper Ultra Max)

 

 

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If naming a planet I would go with something understated. We have eight planets in our solar system: 7 are named after ancient deities, one is basically named "dirt". Only one has life on it.  

I like to think there is some application of God resisting the proud and giving grace to the humble in how we name things so if your planet is a wonderous place full of life and amazing adventures, give it a humble name. 

I'd consider first what the central conceit of the people inhabiting the world is (i.e. humans want to be gods) and determine what the contrasting truth is (i.e. dust we are and to dust we shall return) and name the planet something related to that truth.  

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15 hours ago, Entoman said:

I'd consider first what the central conceit of the people inhabiting the world is

My central conceit is that I am a good writer. I guess my planet must be:

 

   - Illitratus (like illiterate)

   - Beta Analpha (from German word Analphabet which means illiterate)

   - Negramotney (from Russian word negramotnyy, неграмотный)

   - Bradburny (in honor of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451)

 

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On 11/18/2020 at 3:31 PM, paulchernoch said:

My central conceit is that I am a good writer. I guess my planet must be:

 

   - Illitratus (like illiterate)

   - Beta Analpha (from German word Analphabet which means illiterate)

   - Negramotney (from Russian word negramotnyy, неграмотный)

   - Bradburny (in honor of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451)

 

 

One of the fun things about this is that it almost always results in something to think about theologically. 

If we are by nature that which is without word, then it is only because we have been given the Word that we are able to comprehend the Word. 

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3 hours ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

@Joshua Benefiel Honestly, I'm highly reconsidering not doing fantasy. It goes against my conscious.

But I originally thought of her as just a little girl who was sometimes stubborn and not afraid to speak her mind.

 

Do you mean “conscience?” I would certainly steer clear of writing anything you felt you shouldn’t, but your story idea seemed quite innocent to me. Where does the gut check come from?

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Cool story idea! 

If it's a bit like Alice in Wonderland, maybe a name similar or strikes a connection.

Depending on if you're book is at all similar or inspired by Alice in wonderland.

I just wouldn't take the land name "Wonderland" right out since that isn't your story.  

But if it is a land name that reminds readers who love that story, it will probably target your readers.

 

 

 

Edited by BattleTheStorm
Grammar
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54 minutes ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

Personally, I just feel like it goes against my conscience* because fantasy is based off of witchcraft and magic and sorcery. Talking animals can be considered magic, Harry Potter has sorcery...that sort of thing.

I'm glad you recognize that! Fantasy that includes magic/witchcraft is something I steer clear of. But you can definitely write a fantasy story without including witchcraft. When it comes down to it, fantasy is just a story set in a land that doesn't exist 😄. It doesn't have anything to do with magic.

 

But if fantasy as a whole bothers your conscience, I'd stay away from it 🙂

Edited by HK1
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2 hours ago, Ky_GirlatHeart said:

@Zee That's probably how I needed to spell it lol. Thanks for the correction.

Personally, I just feel like it goes against my conscience* because fantasy is based off of witchcraft and magic and sorcery. Talking animals can be considered magic, Harry Potter has sorcery...that sort of thing.

 

It is worth pointing out that there are at least two talking animals in the Bible, neither of which are indicated to have had a magical source. 

Depending on how you understand the incident with Balaam's donkey, the capacity to form thoughts that can be translated into words may already exist in animals. 

Most fantasy I am aware of does involve magic however so if it is writing in a genre that has that reputation that bothers you, I understand. It is often said though that the only difference between Sci-Fi and Fantasy is the paint job. Maybe throw some "technology" in with the talking animals and suddenly you have a Sci-Fi which doesn't have the expectation for "magic" by audiences. 

 

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Fantasy does not have to be oriented around magic, much less around black magic or witchcraft. You should dig into CS Lewis' Space Trilogy- one of the ideas that he works through is what if God tried creation on multiple planets with varying levels of free will?

 

But in that idea, as well, is the thought that maybe he also played around with the design of these other places, making the physics and the laws of nature work differently there.

 

So fantasy can be simply a world that works much differently than ours. It's not magic- to those living there it is perfectly normal, but there could be things about those other worlds (which you get to create) that seem supernatural or magic to someone from plain, ol' earth.

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This could be considered a fantasy story, with talking animals and whatever, but there's no magic involved.

 

"The Missing Hay"

         The seventy-something hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobic lady sat at her computer, struggling to write an intelligent, cohesive story based on twelve words of different lengths. Formulaic exercises and long words caused her a great deal of stress. Her story would have no word with more than four syllables.

 

         On the table next to her computer rested an empty plate. While she worked on her assignment, the microscopic bacteria in her digestive system worked on her lunch: a salad, two tortillas stuffed with beans and pork chili, and a cookie for dessert.

 

         In the computer, displayed on her screen, were the words of a mystery story about horses and burros who solved a crime. By her standards, it should be a bestseller.

 

         The plot was simple: the crime involved the disappearance of a semi load of hay destined for a ranch in western Kansas. A plague of locusts had consumed the usual crop of alfalfa and even the Russian thistle, which the animals probably would have scorned. Not even the new handle on the rancher’s pitchfork was spared.

 

***

 

         Molly and Junior, a buckskin mare and her shorter donkey friend, assigned themselves the task of solving the puzzle. The night after they learned of the disaster, Junior used his clever lips to unlatch the corral gate. The two friends slipped out, but the burro closed the gate behind them.

 

         “Too many of us get out, and the rancher will spend all his time trying to round us all up,” he explained to those inside. “Whenever he comes out, you just mill around so he can’t count and notice that we’re gone. He’ll think the corral is full.”

 

         Not that they had any choice, so they all agreed.

 

         Junior had a plan. “We’ll just follow the road until we smell fresh alfalfa. Then we’ll follow that scent.”

 

         “Maybe we should have brought Herbie along. He has a good sniffer.”

 

         “Yes, Molly, but he’s a dog. He wouldn’t know the difference between alfalfa and straw.”

 

         “Right.”

 

         A half-moon lit the way for the two as they trotted up the road. 

 

         “Do we know where it was coming from?” Junior asked. “We could be heading in the wrong direction.”

 

         “I remember the boss saying one time that the clouds pass over us and drop their rain in this direction. If it rains more where he pointed, then we’re okay.”

 

         On they trotted. The moon passed across the sky and disappeared. A red tinge rose on the horizon in front of them. They maintained their steady speed.

 

         Molly noticed a windmill off to the right. “I’m thirsty. There might be water there.”

 

         “Yes,” Junior agreed, “but there’s also a fence. You can jump it. It will be harder for me.”

 

         Farther on they approached a ranch house and outbuildings. Quietly they walked up the lane, looking for a water tank they could drink from. Over by the corrals they spied a tank in a pen with an open gate. As they quenched their thirst, Molly whispered, “I see a semi with a load of hay out on that road behind us.”

 

         “How do we get there?”

 

         “Maybe there’s another road we didn’t see in the dark.”

 

         They backtracked and found a two-lane dirt path off the main road. Within a short time, they reached the semi, stuck in the mud with the trailer tires buried up to the axles. No people, just the truck and trailer.

 

         “We found it,” Molly said. “Now what do we do?”

 

***

 

         The white-haired lady raised her hands from the keyboard. She blew out a soft breath. “Now what do I do? How do they get word back to their owner? They’ve traveled all night. Molly can run faster than Junior, but it will still take her several hours to return. And then how does she communicate with their owner? How does she make him understand?”

 

         She went to the refrigerator, pulled out a soda, stole a brownie from the cookie jar, and stood thinking in the middle of the kitchen floor. Finally, she sat down and typed.

 

***

 

         Junior pulled out his cell phone, snapped a picture, tapped the number keys with his nose, and waited for their owner to respond.

 

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