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Michael Hyatt used to have a list of Christian agents and updated it. Here is a pdf of that list. However, for some reason, he hasn't updated it since 2014. But it may be worth looking at it anyway. Here are a few good ones:

 

Steve Laube

Tamela Hancock Murray

The Steve Laube Agency

 

Rachelle Gardner

Books & Such

https://www.booksandsuch.com/our-agents/

 

Joyce Hart, Jim Hart, others

www.hartlineliterary.com
 

Bruce Barbour
https://christianliteraryagents.com/bruce-barbour/

 

Chip MacGregor, Amanda Luedeke
http://www.macgregorandluedeke.com/

http://www.macgregorandluedeke.com/about/agents/

 

Kimberly Shumate
http://livingwordliterary.wordpress.com
 

http://christianliteraryagency.com/about-us/

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If you are writing fiction you will not find many.  And if you are writing fantasy fiction, you'll find maybe two or three.  I tried Steve Laube.  There is another one called Fassbender, though he has yet to get back with me.

 

As far as Books and Such goes, they had some really odd requirements, and wanted to know your marketing plan, and your platform.  So, heads up before you go there.

 

Julie Gwinn is another (supposedly).

 

I think Tamala Murry is closed to submissions.  I could be wrong.

 

Who you go to depends on the genera they prefer.  I have been told that if your book does not explicitly state the genera they handle, you should not submit.

 

Good luck.

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Another thing I should add: look for agents that are not based in New York.  The agencies there tend to be fairly hostile to traditional Christian fiction, as per some of the things their agents state in their bio and preferred works.  Look for agencies in states like Utah, Colorado, and the Midwest.  There are a couple on the west coast of Michigan (Grand Rapids) that might be more receptive to Christian authors.

Edited by Jeff Potts
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9 hours ago, Zee said:

You’re self-publishing, right? Shouldn’t need an agent, as far as I know. Maybe a marketing assistant or something like that, though?

I have self-published, but I'm looking into traditional publishing. I am learning a lot about it, and I recently submitted a children's picture book to a publisher, but I know that (for the most part) you need an agent. You don't want your work to end up in "the slush pile".

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Agents have 'slush piles'.  They are MS sent in by authors who are looking for an agent to represent then.  

 

It is very hard to get an agent so be prepared for a long haul. Make sure your query package is in A1 condition before you send it out. Once yoou send an agent your work you wont be able to sub them again.

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