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ProWritingAid is on sale for 40% off. From The Write Life...

 

⭐ 40% off a ProWritingAid license

Apply this discount to a one-year license, which brings the cost to $47.40 (down from $79) or a lifetime license, which brings the cost to $239.40 (down from $399).

 

Find more details here. The offer ends Friday, Oct. 30.

 

⭐ Free webinar with writing and editing tips

The team at ProWritingAid are experts on clarity, grammar and style, and they’ve agreed to share that expertise with you — for free!

 

The webinar is Self-Edit Like a Pro: 5 Tips for Clarity, Grammar and Style. It’s Wed, Oct. 28 at 1 p.m. EST.

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fwiw, I picked up PWA on one of these sales and I use it in conjunction with Scrivener. It's brilliant for that purpose. Scrivener is good at a lot of things but its Spell and Grammar check is weak and PWA has really solid integration. Simply make sure Scrivener is off while you fire up PWA and it does all that for you. It's not bulletproof but it does give you the ability to choose whether to accept the Grammar suggestions or not, which works for me.

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I use PWA.

 

As Caroline says, it is good but it doesn't pick everything up. 

 

For me it helps to straighten out my sentence construction. The 'sticky sentence' faculty really helps for that.

It is also good for picking up passive or weak writing and will offer alternatives. 

 

However, it is designed for commercial and academic writing rather than creative (although it says it is).

 

The main draw back to it is that it does not like check large sections of writing so you may have to do a scene or couple of scenes at a time.

 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Johne said:

That's what I got during one of the bundles when it was half off.

Ugh, I'm on the fence. It's tempting. But £239 isn't cheap, although it's a lifetime fee. I wonder whether I wouldn't be better off spending that money on a bunch of style books or even a course instead. 😁

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1 minute ago, Shamrock said:

So, what is the difference between PWA and and editor software?

I'm not sure I understand your question? I meant that I have a human editor who does line, copy, and content edits on my manuscripts. I'm wondering whether I need to buy Prowriting Aid.

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1 hour ago, EBraten said:

I wonder whether I wouldn't be better off spending that money on a bunch of style books or even a course instead. 😁


What I like about PWA is I know the rules but I don't always catch everything. For example, this is especially good about reminding about missing (or extraneous) commas. I feel free to ignore rules which don't apply to my particular story.

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1 hour ago, EBraten said:

I meant that I have a human editor who does line, copy, and content edits on my manuscripts. I'm wondering whether I need to buy Prowriting Aid.


I'm using PWA as a final personal editing pass and then sending the book to my final editor for the last pass.

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On a completely different subject do agents ever use software programs to shift through submissions?

 

I ask because many now request onlline submissions and I have two subs rejected within 24hrs  of sending each one out which seems ridiculously quick when you don't hear for months from others. 

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14 hours ago, Johne said:

What I like about PWA is I know the rules but I don't always catch everything. For example, this is especially good about reminding about missing (or extraneous) commas. I feel free to ignore rules which don't apply to my particular story.

My interest is more in style issues such as beginning too many sentences the same way, weasel words, and weak sentence construction. I think I already have a process that catches the nuts and bolts grammar issues.

 

Prowriting Aid does so much but writers have such different needs that while it may be a fantastic tool for a particular author, it may not be worth the expense for someone else. Since it's such an investment, I'm trying to gauge whether or not I might have buyer's remorse after getting it!

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3 minutes ago, carolinamtne said:

Suggestion: Try it for a trial period or a year (which is, I think, the shortest subscription time).

Problem is if I like it, I'll feel I've wasted £48 because I could have applied that toward the lifetime subscription! 🤣 A few months ago I actually had a chance to get a year's subscription for free, but didn't take advantage of it. 🤦‍♀️

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