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Jeff Potts

Marketing your work.

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How are you marketing your work?

 

Social media?

 

Paid advertisements?

 

YouTube / Instagram / Tik Tok?

 

Pre-orders, special, swag, giveaways?

 

Book bloggers / reviewers?

 

Just thought I'd ask, as I am currently doing a lot of research on marketing.

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In your research, you will probably find that Pinterest has a better outcome/ROI than Instagram.

 

I would never suggest or use TikTok.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, lynnmosher said:

I would never suggest or use TikTok.

 

I thought about using  that once. Once. Honestly! Then my sons threatened to take my phone and laptop away from me, not that they really needed to. 😁

3 hours ago, Jeff Potts said:

How are you marketing your work?

 

That's the million-dollar mystery. The challenge is finding something that works, and then when you do, the bigger challenge is to pivot to something else that works after what you originally found stops working. 

 

Things change quickly. While you can't sit on the same marketing strategy for very long, there are what I call "foundational strategies" that never change that will help once someone finds your book.

 

1. Make sure your book is written and edited. Seems obvious, but if you look at a lot of books these days, you'd wonder if anyone follows this rule anymore.

 

2. Make sure you have a strong book cover. Contrary to the old saying, people do judge books by their covers.

 

3. Price it correctly. $12.99 for an eBook probably won't sell many copies, unless your someone like John Grisham. 

 

4. Write a strong blurb. Make it something that compels the reader to click on "look inside" and start reading the first chapter. If you wrote a good book, you'll hook them.

 

5. Word of mouth still sells best. If you did steps 1-4 correctly, the reader will likely give you a good rating/review, and spread the word. 

 

6. I'll add one more, just to be a bit snarky (but true). If you find an effective marketing strategy, KEEP IT TO YOURSELF! Seriously, the more you share, the more it's used, and the faster it saturates and stops working.  

 

 

 

Edited by Accord64
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26 minutes ago, Accord64 said:

I thought about using  that once. Once. Honestly! Then my sons threatened to take my phone and laptop away from me, not that they really needed to. 😁

 

LOL Good for them and good for you! xD

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I thought I'd put in a plug here for traditional publishing because so many authors are going directly to the self-publishing platform without going through the rigorous vetting process of a traditional publisher.

 

Look, there's a reason for that folks, and with the sheer number of self-publishers out there today, new books tend to get lost in the shuffle.  They just do, and it's disheartening that so many self-publishers just achieve so minimal sales, because they don't have a traditional publisher behind them.

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7 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Look, there's a reason for that folks, and with the sheer number of self-publishers out there today, new books tend to get lost in the shuffle.  They just do, and it's disheartening that so many self-publishers just achieve so minimal sales, because they don't have a traditional publisher behind them.

 

True, it's a challenge not to get lost in the shuffle. But many trads these days leave marketing to the author. So what's the difference of having a trad behind you, besides taking a piece of the royalties?

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Many traditional publishers do not leave the marketing to the author; they just encourage them to participate in the marketing,  And those are, by and large, indie publishers--not truly traditional publishers.

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3 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Many traditional publishers do not leave the marketing to the author; they just encourage them to participate in the marketing,

 

This is the opposite of what I've encountered and read in numerous author accounts over the past few years. Trads have been cutting costs, and marketing is usually the first thing to go. Most small presses simply can't afford it. 

 

In fact, it has become a common prerequisite to have an established social media/web presence before Trads consider signing you. That's a lot of work for an author, and if they've already achieved this, many just go the self-pub route because they're already well positioned for success (and get to keep a  lot more in royalties).

 

      

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Posted (edited)

I disagree, Accord64, but leave everyone to try their own way first.  The difficulty is, of course, that no traditional publisher wants to publish a work that has already been self-published.  And the sales, are almost never good.

Edited by suspensewriter

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