Jump to content

Welcome to Christian Writers!

We are a friendly community built around Christian writing, publishing, reading and fellowship. Register or sign in today to join in the fun!
Sarah Daffy

Is this possible

Recommended Posts

Can you dream while you're unconscious? Any research I've done has not really come up with an answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, lynnmosher said:

From what I found, you can only dream when asleep.

What if you were given some kind of pain medicine to help you stay asleep for surgery? (this happened to my 1840s protagonist when she got shot in the side. Could the medicine make her dream?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, lynnmosher said:

From what I found, you can only dream when asleep.

 

Well isn't it true that when you're unconscious, that you are asleep?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sarah Daffy said:

What if you were given some kind of pain medicine to help you stay asleep for surgery? (this happened to my 1840s protagonist when she got shot in the side. Could the medicine make her dream?)

Is it necessary for her to dream while she's having the surgery? Couldn't she have the dream while she's sleeping/recovering?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, HK1 said:

Is it necessary for her to dream while she's having the surgery? Couldn't she have the dream while she's sleeping/recovering?

I guess. I had an idea of making her (dream, I guess?) of memories from the past. (is that possible?)

Edited by Sarah Daffy
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I've read usually if the medication is some kind of  general anesthesia that knocks you out, you are in a drug-induced unconsciousness, which is different than sleep. Therefore, you are unlikely to dream as you usually need to reach the REM stage in sleeping to start dreaming. 

 

If you are simply unconscious because you have been knocked out due to some physical force, then you are also unlikely to dream as this is an unnatural state so parts of the brain have ceased to function properly.

 

However, I say unlikely in both scenarios as we still do not have a full understanding of how the brain works so it is possible in either situation for some kind of dream like state to occur. This also doesn't take into account any kind of spiritual influences or effects that are beyond our simple brain chemistry.

Edited by Amosathar
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been out from fainting multiple times (usually due to blood loss) out due to being hit in the head, and out due to general anesthesia. Never once do I recall dreaming...but when I am actually asleep, I often have the most vivid and unusual dreams. Last night I dreamed I was hiking in the desert and saw a flying ostrich...

 

Having your character dream about incidents from her past while sleeping after surgery seems most plausible to me.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea, but I do tend to dream every night very strangely. If you've ever watched the movie Miracles from Heaven, the girl in this film (based on the true story) went unconscious after falling into the tree and actually saw her body before claiming to have gone to Heaven and met Christ, who promised her that she would never get sick again. You can have her dream or something along those lines in your story, but that's entirely up to you.

And @Zee, very interesting dream! Once I had a dream that I was near my church and my screen was pink, and there were these Roblox-like zombie people things crowding the place. I have a strange brain..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Sarah Daffy said:

What if you were given some kind of pain medicine to help you stay asleep for surgery? (this happened to my 1840s protagonist when she got shot in the side. Could the medicine make her dream?)

 

No.

 

I've been through several surgeries.  It's different than sleep.  With sleep, you can kind of feel an "out time," where you can sort of remember a space of time that you were sleeping, even if you don't dream.  But surgery?  You're out, and then you're awake (and in pain).  Like the snap of a finger.  The latter is quicker and more abrupt than the former.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Sarah Daffy, depending on how wealthy a doctor and patient this is, I expect there's just as much chance that an anesthetic medicine would make the patient kind of loopy and out of it. I think pure "knock them out" drugs were rare at that point. Perhaps they just hallucinate the dream. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, during the Civil War, they just gave soldiers a bottle of whiskey or some such. Try internet searching for anesthesia in 1840. I don't think there was much.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, in accordance with this thread, I have a piece of useless information stuck in my brain from my college days.  I did a report on Jack the Ripper, and one of the subjects I investigated was if any of his victims could have been under anesthesia when he was doing his business.

 

 Anesthesia was actually developed in the 1830s or the 1850s, Ether being the substance they used.

 

It wasn't generally used during the Civil War, at least on the battlefield, given that it was a very exacting process (you can kill someone with Ether), and because they were lopping off limbs at a lightning pace, there was no time to apply the anesthesia.

 

In a remote setting, anesthesia probably wouldn't have been used.  This was more of a surgeon's trick, and not a general practitioner.  In the cities, however, it probably would have been in use in places like major hospitals.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If she is unconscious, could her mind astra travel back in time to her past or wherever you want her to go?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had surgery to set four broken bones in one of my ankles, I was given IV morphine for the pain. After I got to a regular room, I started having weird dreams. They seemed very real but weird.  I don't know if they had morphine in the 1860s. I do remember that in some westerns, the doctors use Laudanum, a forerunner of Opium.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was at summer camp I did a backwards flip off the diving board and hit my head on the way down. I can unequivocally say that you can dream while unconscious as I had a half-hour dream in the 1 second it took for me to hit the water. You can guess that the dream ended with me drowning which made me a little disorientated in the water!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can hallucinate when you are drugged. Is that the same as a dream? And if not, would a hallucination work with your story line?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Terribz1 said:

You can hallucinate when you are drugged. Is that the same as a dream? And if not, would a hallucination work with your story line?

I think hallucinations happen when you are either delirious, suffering from lack of sleep, or under drugs. Dreams happen when you're asleep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.