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Lana Christian

Would you read a biblical fiction book if its main character was male?

Would you read a biblical fiction book if its main character was male?  

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  1. 1. If a work of biblical fiction had male main characters (female characters were only orbital/secondary), would you read the book? (This will help me with my book proposal. TIA!)

    • Yes
      12
    • No
      0

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  • Poll closed on 08/16/2020 at 04:30 AM

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Just now, Lana Christian said:

All I'm asking is that if you were to pick up a well-written biblical fiction book and its MC was male, would you still read it?

Sure! I'd actually be more interested in it because it's not the same as every other book out there :D 

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I'm not a reader (don't ask why), but I wouldn't read something strictly because the main character was male or female.  I will say, however, that so many female main characters have been so awful in movies these days, I have become utterly turned-off with anything that has a female main character.

 

Guys are not gals, and gals are not guys, and when you try to make one like the other, it comes off poorly.

 

That being said, publishing of all types is driven by trends.  You might get lucky and buck the trend, and be successful.  Or the trend will kick you in the teeth like an ornery old mule.  But people in the industry want the guaranteed payout, so they are unlikely to go against "the trend."

 

And then someone comes along that creates a new trend.  It happens all of the time.  I work in software, which is trend-driven in ways I dare not illustrate here.

 

My opinion is: write what it is you want to write.  If you are doing something just to get it published, it'll show, and nobody will want to read it.  There is this myopic worldview that thinks that people are different because of race and gender; that they have different dreams, goals, and so on.  It borders on insulting.  People will gravitate to stories based on content, and not on characters.

 

I seem to recall Jesus had lots of stories that wouldn't fit the trends, and strangely enough, he got published.  :)

 

And I'm not so sure that women want to read about female characters.  All of my beta readers are women.  Two out of three openly said they loved what I wrote, and all three want to read the next book.  And it is a male character.

 

And now the important caveat: this is all coming from a, yet, unpublished author.  So take that for what it is.

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5 hours ago, Zee said:

 

I'd have to beg to differ on that--as in many Near/Mid Eastern societies even today, women's roles are far from public, but they count for a great deal. However, their part in society, though greatly influential, is traditionally in the private rather than the public sphere. Since it's somewhat hidden, it's often more difficult to gauge women's influence, leading people from a Western society, where men's and women's roles are both in the public sphere, to think they don't have much influence.

 

4 hours ago, Nicola said:

Thank you for writing what I am thinking!  

This is another level of AND/OR thinking. Our influence is not dependent on our visibility

I have been corrected. Point taken. 

 

4 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

Sorry to distract again, but not likely to find a few car chases in biblical stories, even with male MCs.

No, and not much blowing things up either. 

 

So back to topic. YES, I would probably read it if I read that genre. 

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Posted (edited)

I do read the genre. I grew up on books like Ben Hur and The Robe (which I read nine times!). What matters to me is that the book follow (with some creativity) the events in the Bible. I did not like The Red Tent, because I felt the author took too many liberties with the text. (I don't remember them now, as it has been several years.)

Edited by carolinamtne

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15 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

not likely to find a few car chases in biblical stories, even with male MCs.

I bet you could take a few liberties with Jehu! "For he drives like a madman!" (Now I feel challenged to write about a woman from Jehu's time with chariot chases and something blowing up.)

 

This is an interesting topic because I'm thinking about the few Biblical themed books I've read. I don't think I've read much but the ones with female leads tend to bore me, or have ... relationship themes that I don't enjoy reading (prostitution, having to avoid a married man's advancements, etc).

 

Whether I read a Biblical based book has everything to do with the plot and nothing to do with the gender of the main character.

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If you sub other kinds of chases for car chases, there are plenty in the Bible! 🙂 (My book about the Wise Men has Herod's guards and Nabataeans and an unknown enemy chasing them.) 🙂 

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OK - I am going to take a left turn with this out of curiosity.

 

On a broad landscape of publishing I wonder if more books sale if they have a female main character than male?

 

The reason I ask is that reviewing my own first 4 books I have noted the following pattern

 

1. Natural Talent - male & female m/cs

2. Demons -  male & female m/cs

3. Child of No One - male m/c

4. Granny Annie - female m/c

 

In the series I am working on at the moment the first book has a female m/c. I am trying to work out whether to let her carry on being the m/c for book two or have her brother at the m/c.

 

Does it matter or not?

 

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@Shamrock, I don't know what genre you write in, so I can only speak to biblical fiction. The big 5 trad publishers who produce biblical fiction don't want to take on books in that genre unless the MC is female (and all the agents who rep biblical fiction know that). So, as of today, unless a miracle happens, writing biblical fiction with a male MC becomes a matter of whether to woo a smaller press (no agent, little or no advance, more marketing work for yourself) or go indie (everything is on your head). 

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Posted (edited)

My thought was to bring either the brother or sister of the first book to England.  

 

The natural candidate would be the brother with the ending I have at present,  ( he goes from not wanting to move away from home at the beginning to realizing he needs to by the end)  but I could introduce a new female character  who he meets when in the UK who could also be a m/c as I have done with my previous books.

 

Thanks @carolinamtne One problem sorted😀

Edited by Shamrock
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On 8/12/2020 at 7:46 AM, EClayRowe said:

I don't know how it's doing, but our own PenName has a book out on the Joseph story. 

I wish it was out, @EClayRowe! No publishers or agents are interested so far. Though a few have been complimentary, they say it's "not for them." 

 

@Lana Christian and I were chatting, and I think I'm having the same problem she is. Joseph is a guy. 

 

Sigh. 

 

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