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Zee

...And the Next Character Challenge

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So, after the generally nice character who needs to get more serious about his faith, I have the character who's really been through it. He's had a terrible time and is beginning to come a little unglued (or maybe a lot, depending on the point of view.) This wouldn't be so tricky to portray, perhaps, except that in addition to being a danger to himself and others, he's also supposed to be a sympathetic character. Loose cannon and likeable. I've heard it's possible.

 

Examples? Ideas?

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27 minutes ago, Jeff Potts said:

George S. Patton?

 

 

Hmmm, I’ve heard of him, but not familiar with what he was like, other than that he was a famous general.

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Look up "manic" or "mania". I imagine a manic character might have some of what you are describing - they could be both likable and sympathetic, but also potentially a danger to self.

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You're remembering a lot of characters, SW, or you've been reading a lot since your stroke. Either way, I'm impressed.

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Hmmm, a character along the lines of Raskolnikov, with some traits of Prince Myshkin thrown in would be memorable indeed. I’m not sure I could pull it off.

 

Hopefully the character I am working on at least won’t be entirely forgettable...

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Hey, @Zee, what's the genre? Also, what is the profession of the character? Spooner from iRobot (the movie, not the book) is coming to mind. He is a slightly cracked law enforcement officer who is just enough over the edge to lose his badge temporarily, because he's seen as a lose cannon who needs help. However, his cracked-ness becomes the only reason he can solve the case, which he does, independently. 

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1 hour ago, PenName said:

Hey, @Zee, what's the genre? Also, what is the profession of the character? Spooner from iRobot (the movie, not the book) is coming to mind. He is a slightly cracked law enforcement officer who is just enough over the edge to lose his badge temporarily, because he's seen as a lose cannon who needs help. However, his cracked-ness becomes the only reason he can solve the case, which he does, independently. 

 

The genre is romantic suspense. The character in question is a tattoo artist by profession. He also had a brief but disastrous stint as a security guard for a paramilitary leader.

 

He’s a side character, but he’s about to roll in and throw a major wrench into the plot. I want it to come across as believable, but also not have everyone end up hating him...

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22 hours ago, Zee said:

, but he’s about to roll in and throw a major wrench into the plot.

I think the easiest way to make him still likable is to have him turn out to be right about something all along and then/or (but both might be better) be critically helpful in some way. If he's only running around causing chaos for the heroes, the audience will just wonder why the heroes keep him around and might be annoyed or angry with them or the cracked character. 

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