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Sarah Daffy

How do you make your characters flawed?

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Just now, RockyMtn Gal said:

See, you already have the set up for dementia here.

Excellent!

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7 minutes ago, PenName said:

(Did they have checks in 1840?)

1700s was the first printed check I think.

 

You may need to "check" on that SarahDaffy

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Also, check on the phone bit. I just remembered that 1840 might be a little early for Aunt Eunice to have a phone.

 

She might have to send another servant to fetch the police.

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Oh! I forgot. One more question. Two, actually.

 

How does the policeman let Heidi take the punishment and what is the punishment?

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1 hour ago, RockyMtn Gal said:

Well, then there's still word of mouth. The lawyer could have described Heidi.

 

There were photographs as PenName mentioned.

 

If the aunt is a menacing character, her force of will might cow Heidi into revealing who she is while simultaneously telling readers about the aunt's character. I.e.:

 

 

Aunt grabbed Heidi's arm. Her fingers pressed into her wrist hard enough to make her squeal.

 

"Little urchins!" Aunt growled. "How many times have I told you not to trespass on my property? Who are you? Who are your parents?"

 

Heidi writhed in her grip, pushing at her aunts hand, anything to relive her vice-like grip.

 

"Stop! You're hurting me!"

 

"Who are you?!"

 

Heidi tried to squirm away. Her knees buckled when her aunt squeezed tighter.

 

"Fine," Aunt said. "I'm calling the police!"

 

Heidi's eyes grew wide.

 

"I'm Heidi..."

 

 

Even if the aunt is not menacing, mentioning the police would probably be enough to scare any little girl. 

Do you mind if I quote you on this?

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7 hours ago, RockyMtn Gal said:

Also, check on the phone bit. I just remembered that 1840 might be a little early for Aunt Eunice to have a phone.

 

She might have to send another servant to fetch the police.

First phone call wasn't until the 1870s; first telegraph message was 1840s but that that's not something even a wealthy person would have had in their home. So "call" would have to be in the "sent for" sense.

 

Did I see this is happening in Boston? Boston PD wasn't officially formed until the late 1830s, so the police may not have been the first thing on anyone's mind to call. Not sure, but a wealthy person might have more likely had someone they paid for matters of security.

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I don’t understand why Heidi is so reluctant to go live with her aunt in the first place, so much so that she’s rather go live on the streets than even take a chance with her.

 

If I’d spent my childhood in an orphanage, and then learned that a relative, possibly eccentric but well-intentioned, was coming to give me a home (and ultimately, a lot of money) I can’t imagine the circumstances that would lead me to run away without ever having met them.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Chris Brown said:

First phone call wasn't until the 1870s; first telegraph message was 1840s but that that's not something even a wealthy person would have had in their home. So "call" would have to be in the "sent for" sense.

 

Did I see this is happening in Boston? Boston PD wasn't officially formed until the late 1830s, so the police may not have been the first thing on anyone's mind to call. Not sure, but a wealthy person might have more likely had someone they paid for matters of security.

Lol, I actually woke up this morning wondering about PDs Chris.

 

It could work either way @Sarah Daffy

Private security, or police are good options if you decide to go that route.

Edited by RockyMtn Gal
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10 hours ago, Sarah Daffy said:

Oh! I forgot. One more question. Two, actually.

 

How does the policeman let Heidi take the punishment and what is the punishment?

 

Well, I could see this happening if the cop/private security guy doesn’t know which girl is Raven, and he ends up dragging the wrong one off to jail. But I think a little misunderstanding like that would get ironed out pretty quickly.

 

 It doesn’t seem plausible that he would intentionally injure or kill a young girl, knowing she wasn’t even guilty. At least I should certainly hope not...

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11 hours ago, Zee said:

 

Well, I could see this happening if the cop/private security guy doesn’t know which girl is Raven, and he ends up dragging the wrong one off to jail. But I think a little misunderstanding like that would get ironed out pretty quickly.

 

 It doesn’t seem plausible that he would intentionally injure or kill a young girl, knowing she wasn’t even guilty. At least I should certainly hope not...

This happens five years later.  Raven is already in jail and Heidi got (I assume) blamed for a crime she didn't commit so got thrown in Raven's cell.

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