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suspensewriter

Which Writer Do You Look to for Inspiration?

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7 hours ago, Joshua Benefiel said:

GK Chesterton,

 

Ooo...forgot about him. Haven't read his books but need to. Watch the TV series every Saturday night which is based on his Father Brown series from England. Love this mystery series.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Tolkien?  I just started reading the Hobbit! 

Hopefully you haven't seen the movies. As usual, Hollywood took a lot of creative liberties. Ones that unfortunately didn't do the story any favors.

 

How are you liking the book so far?

 

For my list, Tolkien is an obvious first.

 

In random order for the rest:

 

-Rosemary Sutcliff

-Brandon Sanderson

-Charles Dickens 

-Sir Walter Scott

-Alexandre Dumas

-The Brothers Grimm

-George R.R. Martin-I read the first 2 chapters of GoT and decided it was too much. However, the writing style was honestly brilliant. I wish I could read more just to get a handle on it.

 

Edited by RockyMtn Gal
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No, I read the books and saw the movies before my stroke, so I don't remember them at all, so this is like a first time, unadulterated read!  Alexander Dumas and Sir Walter Scott are now on my definitely to read list.

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21 hours ago, EClayRowe said:

Orson Scott Card. Other writers that I admired from this era of science fiction haven't held up as well. And he teaches; he's the author of instructional books on writing.

 

Douglas Adams. Humorous writing is hard to pull off. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy ( five books and a short story) is self-contradictory,  a sprawling mess of cliches and stereotypes. But Adams always makes me laugh.

 

 

 

Two of my favorites as well. In fact, my current WIP is dedicated to the proposition that the answer really is 42...

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14 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

 

I've got to check this guy out!  He sounds to good to be true.

 

He wrote a great trilogy retelling the Robin Hood mythology set in Wales just after the Norman conquest of England.

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3 hours ago, paulchernoch said:

 

Two of my favorites as well. In fact, my current WIP is dedicated to the proposition that the answer really is 42...

 

I believe that the question mark is the forty-second ASC-II symbol. I may be drummed out of the Philosophers' Union for telling you that.

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That's what it was! I was trying to link to the article I saw on a Douglas Adams fanpage. 

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Posted (edited)

If the answer is 42, then Jesus is the answer!

 

  • Matthew lists 42 men in his Genealogy from Abraham to Jesus.
  • Luke lists 42 men from David to Jesus (if you skip Joseph, who was not his biological father and assume it is Mary's line)
  • Job has 42 chapters, beginning with suffering but ending in blessing, long life and peace
  • 42 = 6 x 7, where 6 means man, made on the sixth day of Creation and 7 means God or perfection and Jesus is both man and God
  • 42 = 2 x 3 x 7, where Jesus is two (two natures, human and divine, two Testaments in the Word, and Jesus is the Word), the Father is 3, the thrice Holy God of Revelation, and the Holy Spirit is 7 (the sevenfold spirit of God in Isaiah and the seven spirits in Revelation)
  • 210 = 5 x 42, where 5 is the process of farming to produce a harvest (plowing, planting, watering, weeding, and reaping the harvest) and 42 is the work of the Trinity and 210 years is how long Job lived in total (70 years before being blessed, plus double that or 140 years after being blessed)

Just thought a little fun with Biblical numerology was in order...

 

Edited by paulchernoch
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Taylor Caldwell, Ayn Rand, and Francine Rivers - my favorite of hers is the Mark of the Lion series.

 

That's the women, for men, Heinlein, Joel Rosenberg, Vince Flynn and Tom Clancy

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4 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

What are you guys talking about??

If you're asking about the ASCII, computers don't write letters. They write numbers. Each letter (and each number) and each of these things on the keyboard above the numbers has a code number that tells the computer what to show on your screen. #42 shows an asterisk. #63 is a question mark. #s 65 to 90 are the capital letters. #s 97 to 122 are the lower-case letters. And there's lots of stuff in between.

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You people here inspire me!  Keep on writing!  

John Buchan, Jeffrey Farnol, Ralph Connor, Ridgewell Cullum. They all wrote before 1950. 

Camilla Hayes and Graeme Connell are members of my local group. They are in their seventies and stirring up the dust, writing about controversial subjects. 

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For a delightful read, Dorothy Sayers, Josephine  Tey or Agatha Christie.

 

But I can’t say I attempt to write like any of them.

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Have no heard of Stephen R. Lawhead. Will check him out.

 

The book that got me back writing about 10 years ago was a YA novel called 'Dear Nobody' by Bernie Dochorty.  It was the style of writing - a set of letters by two teenage parents to their baby daughter about how their relationship and her birth. It was so moving and simply written.  I still get a lump in my throat just thinking about the book.

 

The other writing I take inspiration from is Virginia Woolf.  By today's writing standards she would probably not get To The Lighthouse published because  much of her writing in it would be considered 'passive writing' But the middle section 'Time Passages' is one of the greatest pieces of literature where human nature and the elements are linked. Seriously beautiful. 

 

Of course there is as always the Bible. Probably one of the most published books of all time.

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Virginian Wolf, boy that rings a bell somewhere.  Boy I've really learned a lot from this post.  Writers, writers and more writers to read!

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For fiction writing in general: James Rubart, DiAnn Mills, KM Weiland
For storytelling in general: Steven James (Read his "Story Trumps Structure" book--it'll revolutionize the way you write!)

For biblical fiction (which I write): Mesu Andrews, Tessa Afshar
For apologetics and exegesis: Ravi Zacharias, David Jeremiah

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