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suspensewriter

Which Writer Do You Look to for Inspiration?

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2 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Who do you look to for your inspiration in your writing?

Do I get to say you? 

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What Alley said! :D

 

I draw inspiration from the writers here. When it comes to worldbuilding, I draw inspiration from Tolkien. If he could create such a detailed fantasy world, then so can I. 

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Posted (edited)

The Apostle Paul. If I list the Bible passages that have helped me the most, the largest number were written by that man:

 

  • 1 Corinthians 13 taught me what love really means; weeks later I was saved
  • Philippians 2 set me free from over a decade of depression, taught me the source of Joy, gave it to me, and baptised me in the Holy Spirit
  • Galatians 2 set me free from the fear of death and of leading a meaningless life
  • Romans 6 reassured me after I lost many things in four months (marriage proposal rejected, fired from a job, car broke down, Bible study leader left the church and the faith, devastated when Christian retreat speaker taught heresy, God exposed how I used religion to try to control others) that after we die to self in Christ, we rise with him
  • Romans 7 reassured me that nothing inside me (my sin and failings) can separate me from Christ
  • Romans 8 promised that nothing outside me can separate me from Christ
  • Galatians 5 began to teach me what are the spiritual treasures that Jesus taught us to seek, and especially challenged me to learn the meaning of kindness, which was an entirely foreign concept to me.
  • Acts 20:35 helped teach me that goodness means generosity.

"In everything I did, I showed you that by this kind of hard work we must help the weak, remembering the words the Lord Jesus himself said: ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’ ” (Acts 20:35)

 

When I was a child, I hated my name. Having met the Apostle Paul through his writings, I now labor to carry that name with honor.

Edited by paulchernoch
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Wow! So many inspire me. But I think Ken Gire's retelling of New Testament stories is the inspiring flint that sparks my imagination.

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As a fan of the Story Grid, I'm used to finding masterworks which fit the genre I'm writing in. For THE BLUE GOLEM, I've identified THE AUTOMATIC DETECTIVE by A. Lee Martinez, the Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells, and various others.

In addition to masterworks, novels which inform my genre, I've also identified a Master Writer, an author who has informed my tone, my sentence construction, my writing sensibilities. I am a  lifelong acolyte of Roger Zelazny. As writers go, he's spoiled me for slower, more explicit writers (like Tolkien - after reading Zelazny, I couldn't finish THE HOBBIT). 

I could grab anything to share from Zelazny, but I just read this from his latest book to hit Kindle, DOORWAYS IN THE SAND. 

 

Quote

He did not seem to notice but went on paging through the materials.

Several minutes passed in this fashion, then: “All right,” he said, “I’m ready for you.” He looked up at me then and he smiled.

“This semester. Mister Cassidy, we are going to graduate you,” he said.

I smiled back at him.

“That, Mister Wexroth, will be a cold day in hell,” I said.

 

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8 minutes ago, Johne said:

Roger Zelazny

 

Roger Zelazny?  I've never heard of him either.  Yet another one to look up!    Thanks, Johne!

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Orson Scott Card. Other writers that I admired from this era of science fiction haven't held up as well. And he teaches; he's the author of instructional books on writing.

 

Douglas Adams. Humorous writing is hard to pull off. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy ( five books and a short story) is self-contradictory,  a sprawling mess of cliches and stereotypes. But Adams always makes me laugh.

 

 

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41 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

Roger Zelazny?  I've never heard of him either.  Yet another one to look up! 

 

If I had to start anywhere, I'd probably start with his short stories. He's won both Hugo and Nebula awards, and his most famous collection is probably FOUR FOR TOMORROW, which includes both A Rose for Ecclesiastes (1963) about the power of language and The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth (1965) about a group of leviathan hunters on a distant water world.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/77788.Four_for_Tomorrow

A personal favorite is The Last Defender of Camelot, which clocks in around 8k words. The Saturday Evening Post was interested in publishing it if he cut it by 4k words but he said it sounded funny if he cut every other word and sold it elsewhere.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1942065.The_Last_Defender_of_Camelot

His most popular books are the Chronicles of Amber, a decalogy where the first five books about Lord Corwin are the best known:
https://www.goodreads.com/series/49385-amber-the-corwin-cycle

His highest profile standalone novel is probably LORD OF LIGHT, for which he won the Hugo in 1968.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13821.Lord_of_Light

For pure fun, you can't go wrong with the experimental novel ROADMARKS.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/939645.Roadmarks

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Orson Scott Card- I've only read Ender's Game, and man that was good.  I read Douglas Adams before my stroke, but I don't remember him now.  I'll have to read him again.

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1 hour ago, suspensewriter said:

Ken Gire?   I never heard of him before, but now I'm going to have to look him up.  Thanks, Lynn!

 

Moments with the Savior. Beautiful! Audiobook is free. 

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1 hour ago, EClayRowe said:

Orson Scott Card.

Yes! Loved both Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow

1 hour ago, EClayRowe said:

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy ( five books and a short story) is self-contradictory,  a sprawling mess of cliches and stereotypes. But Adams always makes me laugh.

Yep. This sums it up. Even though I didn't enjoy the story per se, I enjoyed the read overall. Had me laughing all the way through

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3 hours ago, Joshua Benefiel said:

JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis, GK Chesterton, Steven James, Stephen R. Lawhead

 

Stephen R. Lawhead - I've loved everything he's written!

Such a wonderful storyteller. I don't think I want to know how many hours he puts into research for his novels. lol

 

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6 hours ago, Joshua Benefiel said:

JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis, GK Chesterton, Steven James, Stephen R. Lawhead

 

Man, I am sure learning something from this post!

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3 hours ago, BrianM said:

Stephen R. Lawhead - I've loved everything he's written!

 

I've got to check this guy out!  He sounds to good to be true.

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