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Nancy Sonneman

Writing on Sunday

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Hi;

 

My schedule is pretty tight. My best writing day would be Sunday--but is that going against the commandment to honor the sabbath? I am working, after all.

 

What do you think? 

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Unless you are a paid writer or professional author, I don't think it's going against the commandment. For most of us unpublished writers, I think we can call it a relaxing hobby for now. Work, for me, is what you get paid to do. There are also exceptions to that commandment, even if you are getting paid, if you are doing work for God. For example, we have paid song leaders at church.

That's my interpretation. 

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You'll probably get many different interpretations here, and all will be worth considering. It'll probably best boil down to your finding what you're truly comfortable with. If you feel there's a problem there, then it's going to be a problem for you. If not, I would think you have freedom.

 

I would note that we don't really find any comments in the New Testament about our needing to avoid work on the sabbath. Yet if required, this would surely have been a huge deal for the people when it was written. After all, most people were dirt-poor in those days, and losing one day in seven in being able to provide for themselves and their families would have been a great hardship for many. The idea of simply having the luxury to take time off, like we can, was not a common one back then. It was pretty much only required in Jewish law, and unless you were wealthy, it was the only place it happened.

 

However, if you sincerely feel a need to avoid work on one day, then by all means, follow your personal convictions.

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The fact that you raised the question suggests to me that you feel it is a problem. As Wes wrote above, 

6 minutes ago, Wes B said:

If you feel there's a problem there, then it's going to be a problem for you.

On the other hand, Jesus was frequently accused of breaking the Sabbath because they considered healing to be work. Let you be the one to decide whether writing is a resting, relaxing, fun activity for you or actually is work. 

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4 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

Let you be the one to decide whether writing is a resting, relaxing, fun activity for you or actually is work. 

 

Yes, I think that is the proper answer, Nancy.

 

But I have a question- does this apply after sundown?

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4 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

 

Yes, I think that is the proper answer, Nancy.

 

But I have a question- does this apply after sundown?

 

I suspect you're now getting into Jewish law. In that case, "sabbath day," in Hebrew, Yom Shabbat, begins at sundown on Friday, and ends on sundown, Saturday, and yes, Yom Shabbat is the Hebrew word for Saturday. If you're a member of a "Seventh Day" denomination, you'll likely follow this sabbath restriction.

 

Since people back in the day did not typically stay up after dark, most being dirt-poor, and unable to afford even the feeble nighttime illumination available, they typically went to sleep as soon as night fell. The day was over.

 

While we speak of Sunday as a "Christian Sabbath," I can't think of any New Testament reference to the phrase; there's only a mention that some Christians met on the "first day," i.e., Sunday. Beyond its mention as a day that Christians chose to meet, the absence of mention of a legalism surrounding boundaries might suggest that the exact boundary wasn't considered important.

 

I respect the fact that there are an enormous number of denominations represented here, and some may offer observations very different from my own. I would welcome these as a matter of my own education, and would not argue them, preferring instead to learn more about the rich variations in the Christian faith that we share.

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6 minutes ago, Wes B said:

If you're a member of a "Seventh Day" denomination, you'll likely follow this sabbath restriction.

 

No, definitely not.  I was just curious is all.

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Understood. I'm just trying to (gently) point out the problems we can wade into when we get hung up on sabbath restrictions. For example, one sabbath restriction (in the Old Testament: the only place where sabbath restrictions are given) it is forbidden to kindle or extinguish a fire on the sabbath. Since one use for fire is illumination, those following modern sabbath restrictions will not turn a light on or off during sabbath-time. This opens a huge can of worms...

 

Our observant Jewish friends will unscrew the light bulbs inside their refrigerators, on Friday afternoon, lest they break the sabbath by doing what is equivalent to kindling and extinguishing a flame, simply by going to the 'fridge. It gets worse...

 

There are high-rise apartment buildings in Manhattan, where the elevators switch over to "sabbath mode" on Friday evenings. See, if you push an elevator button, you light a light, equivalent to kindling a flame, breaking the sabbath. In sabbath mode, the elevators continuously go up & down, stopping at all floors, so no one has to press any buttons.

 

I (thankfully & with great relief) believe that the New Covenant has freed us from the complex restrictions of The Law. We can try to make new sabbath restrictions, but if we follow them to their logical conclusions, wild stuff happens...

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When I compete in NaNoWriMo, if I'm writing all week, I take a day off from writing sometime during the weekend. The first year I did it, I took Saturday off and was re-energized to write Sunday afternoon. The next time I competed, I took Sunday off. Either way, it was a day of rest and I was a better writer (and a better person to be around) for building a budget in for that time to rest.

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1 hour ago, Wes B said:

I (thankfully & with great relief) believe that the New Covenant has freed us from the complex restrictions of The Law.

 

I wholeheartedly agree.

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Previously, I was in a denomination that followed a Book of Discipline (teaching.) That book told us that Sunday was a day to honor the LORD.  One thing that book said was to refrain from any "unecessary"  purchases on that day.  I have followed some bloggers who prefer not to write on Sundays. I have tried to follow that practice. However, it is difficult. If I stay off my computer and use my tablet or my portable word-processor,  or text a couple of friends on my cell phone, am I violating my own decision?

 

If I am working for Him and my writing goal is to glorify Him, then I find I am not violating my resolve to bring glory to Him.

 

Nancy: This is a decision that each of us has to make, with His guidance.

 

Quote


 

 

Edited by quietspirit
attempt to emove quote frame

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On 2/17/2020 at 6:15 AM, Nancy Sonneman said:

My best writing day would be Sunday--but is that going against the commandment to honor the sabbath?

 

This was supposed to be on the above posting. Sorry for the confusion.

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Two cents and worth every penny:

 

"The Sabbath was made for humanity; humanity wasn't made for the Sabbath."

 

"The person who keeps the holy days keeps them for the Lord. And the person who practices reverence for the Lord every day does this for the Lord as well. Each individual should be settled in his own mind and respect the sensitivities of others as well."

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1 hour ago, EClayRowe said:

Two cents and worth every penny:

 

"The Sabbath was made for humanity; humanity wasn't made for the Sabbath."

 

"The person who keeps the holy days keeps them for the Lord. And the person who practices reverence for the Lord every day does this for the Lord as well. Each individual should be settled in his own mind and respect the sensitivities of others as well."

 

Worth much more than two cents, IMHO...

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