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lynnmosher

Do you have sesquipedalian tendencies?

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Do you have sesquipedalian tendencies? From dictionary.com...

 

Sesquipedalianism is the tendency to use long words.

 

Just for fun. Here are some really long words...

 

*pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanokoniosis: You might notice the appearance of pseudo- twice. That’s because this disorder simulates the symptoms of pseudohypoparathyroidism, in which the body doesn't respond to the parathyroid hormone. So, there are two levels of "faking it" going on here.

*floccinaucinihilipilification: It means "the estimation of something as valueless." It is usually used in reference to itself!

*dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)

 

*Get this one. It’s the name of a place in Webster, Massachusetts. Also called Webster Lake...

Char­gogg­a­gogg­man­chaugg­a­gogg­chau­bun­a­gung­a­maugg

 

*supercalifragilisticexpialidocious: While Mary Poppins popularized this word you say when you don't know what else to say, the nonsensical supercalifragilisticexpialidocious can be found in various versions as early as the 1930s, including in a 1949 song whose songwriters tried (and failed) to sue Disney for copyright infringement.

 

 

 

 

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at times, I feel I can be that way... long worded instead of long winded... 

 

One time, I wrote a poem for a high school assignment and (with some use of a thesaurus...) hardly had a single word under three syllables. Some of the words, I later found out, were old english words that aren't used much any more... 

 

I had fun with it! Words like; animadversion, locution, volition, juxtaposition... I wish I could find it for you guys, but it's buried in storage right now...

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I think I'm more sesquipedalian than I think; I probably try to use longer words just to make me look more intelligent. 😂

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    As a writer I never use words that most readers wouldn't know.  I want them to understand what I have to say, without any difficulty.  I just put ordinary words together as best I can.  As a result, almost all of my writings, which I've posted on several writers websites, have received very high ratings and positive reviews.

   As a Christian writer, I don't know if there are any "Big Words" in the Bible, that most people wouldn't know.  While it contains many ideas, which are very difficult to understand, the words themselves are not. 

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The big words I encounter are on our prescription bottles. Those generic names seem to have to be four syllables long. Hmm! Must be some law about that.😉

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Don't forget chlorodifluoromethane, it was used to keep you cool in your car for a long time. Or Tetrafluoroethane  which replaced it and the newer Tetrafluoropropene, which I would rather they don;t use.

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18 minutes ago, zx1ninja said:

Don't forget chlorodifluoromethane, it was used to keep you cool in your car for a long time. Or Tetrafluoroethane  which replaced it and the newer Tetrafluoropropene, which I would rather they don;t use.

 

Love it! :D

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2 hours ago, quietspirit said:

The big words I encounter are on our prescription bottles. Those generic names seem to have to be four syllables long. Hmm! Must be some law about that.😉

 

LOL I think you're right, QS! :D

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I've said that one perfect larger word can take the place of many smaller, dumber words. Harlan Ellison came up reading the dictionary every day and exulted in forcing his readers to scramble to follow along. I like his approach. He didn't force words but employed them with the precision of a surgeon. I learned many new words reading his columns and his short stories.

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2 hours ago, zx1ninja said:

Don't forget chlorodifluoromethane, it was used to keep you cool in your car for a long time. Or Tetrafluoroethane  which replaced it and the newer Tetrafluoropropene, which I would rather they don;t use.

Wait... Wait! I know what those are! Finally, some long words I can read and understand! 

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19 hours ago, lynnmosher said:

*Get this one. It’s the name of a place in Webster, Massachusetts. Also called Webster Lake...

Char­gogg­a­gogg­man­chaugg­a­gogg­chau­bun­a­gung­a­maugg

 

Ha - I have a nephew who lives near this lake. They shorted the official name to lake Chaubunagungamaug, but the locals just call it Webster (Webstaah) lake.

 

I try to avoid using words that challenge my spell checker, or sends my grammar checker into conniptions.  :D

Edited by Accord64

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I don't mind a couple of unfamiliar words tossed in. I love looking them up. But they're tossed in by the handful...no thanks! o_O

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     I remember when I was going to school, I heard  that the longest word in the English language is "Antidisestablishmenterrianism".  I never heard anyone use the word, until I was in the 10th Grade.  Then I think it was my History Teacher who told us the definition which is:  "Against the Party, that's against the Party, that's against the Church of England."

   Then I realized that the lengthiest English word, which I've never heard anyone use in any conversation, concerns Mid16th Century English History.  

   Now I wonder, if someone writes an historical novel, about England at that time, would the main character be described as an "Antidisestablishmenterrianist"?  How about "Pro-Episcopalian"?

   Would the novel's title be "The Antidisestablishmenterrianist"?  Would anyone want to purchase a book with that title?  Would people buy one titled "The Pro-Episcopalian"?

   A book with either title would have to have one really great cover illustration.  

   It could be titled "The Anti-Catholic".  Now that title would really attract everyone's attention.  It might also cause a lot of trouble; demonstrations, riots, law-suits, and who knows what else?  It might also become a best seller.

Edited by William D'Andrea

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15 hours ago, Claire Tucker said:

Wait... Wait! I know what those are! Finally, some long words I can read and understand! 

I just like the fact that someone knows what those are. 😊

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My brother used to tease our late Italian mother about her accent when she spoke English. One day, she teased back and said, "I dare you to pronounce this very long Italian word: precipitevolissimevolmente. (The word means "precipitously; hastily.") Well, my mischievous brother got his just deserts. :) He never again teased our Mom about her accent. :)

 

 

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I don't use long words because I taught ninth graders for 30 years. I wanted them to understand me. And now I don't know any bigger words.

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Interestingly--and sadly--studies show that most readers read at a sixth grade level.  Even more recent studies show that they now read at a fourth grade level.  

 

MaryAnn

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Makes me think of this video. 😂 I'm part Welsh and my dream is to one day be able to pronounce this lol.

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On 1/24/2020 at 1:57 PM, William D'Andrea said:

     I remember when I was going to school, I heard  that the longest word in the English language is "Antidisestablishmenterrianism".  I never heard anyone use the word, until I was in the 10th Grade.  Then I think it was my History Teacher who told us the definition which is:  "Against the Party, that's against the Party, that's against the Church of England."

 

Reminds me of this Honeymooners dialogue from the "$99,000 Answer" episode:

 

Alice:
Spell "antidisestablishmentarianism".

Ralph:
I'll spell it.

[pauses apprehensively]

Ralph:
I'll spell it!

Alice:
[waiting patiently] Well? Go ahead.

Ralph:
I'll spell it!

[agitated]

Ralph:
I'll spell it when you give me $16,000 for spelling it!

Alice:
[sarcastically] 16,000 for spelling it? I'll give you 32,000 if you can SAY it!

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9 hours ago, MaryAnn Diorio said:

Interestingly--and sadly--studies show that most readers read at a sixth grade level.  Even more recent studies show that they now read at a fourth grade level.  

 

MaryAnn

Believe it or not! 

 

I'm told to keep big technical terms out of my reports because many attorneys and judges won't understand. So I'm forced to write them so a ten year old can understand them. But I don't like doing that for fear of insulting my reader. So I use the big technical term and then (put a simple layman's term in parentheses). Which may not avoid that in the end. 

Edited by zx1ninja

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On 1/25/2020 at 8:39 PM, carolinamtne said:

I don't use long words because I taught ninth graders for 30 years. I wanted them to understand me. And now I don't know any bigger words.

 

I have a fairly large vocabulary, however, when I write I find myself falling back on common words.  Then I end up keeping them because I like they way they go together in a sentence.

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2 hours ago, Jeff Potts said:

 

I have a fairly large vocabulary, however, when I write I find myself falling back on common words.  Then I end up keeping them because I like they way they go together in a sentence.

I also have a strong tendency to do this. It actually frustrates me no end. 😕

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