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Why does it feel as if the question is missing the words "riddle me this" in it? 

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51 minutes ago, Alley said:

Why does it feel as if the question is missing the words "riddle me this" in it? 

 

So, what's your guess?

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13 minutes ago, Bob Leone said:

 

So, what's your guess?

Not a clue! The year God made the sun stand still? 

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According to the Bible:

 

    "Then Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the children of Israel, and he said in the sight of Israel:

                                            'Sun, stand still over Gibeon;
                                            And Moon, in the Valley of Aijalon.'
                                           So the sun stood still,
                                           And the moon stopped,
                                          Till the people had revenge
                                          Upon their enemies.

"Is this not written in the Book of Jasher? So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and did not hasten to go down for about a whole day.  And there has been no day like that, before it or after it, that the Lord heeded the voice of a man; for the Lord fought for Israel." 

     (Joshua 10: 12-14)

 

    This means that the Lord put the breaks on the Earth's spinning around it's axis. for an entire day, which made it the longest day (or night on the opposite side of the world.) in history.  However, it does not say that He halted our Planet's circling the Sun.  So that doesn't mean that the year was one day longer.

   

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5 minutes ago, William D'Andrea said:

So that doesn't mean that the year was one day longer.

 

Okay , you guys being good Christians are thinking biblically. 

This isn't a bible stumpier. In history what was the longest year. 

Edited by Bob Leone

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5 minutes ago, Bob Leone said:

Okay , you guys being good Christians are thinking biblically.

     "Thinking biblically"?  Well this website is named christianwriters.com; so what did you expect?

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3 minutes ago, William D'Andrea said:

Well this website is named christianwriters.com; so what did you expect?

Lol, no offense. Maybe I should have stated that.

 

I just found out about this longest year yesterday and I thought it would be fun to share.

 

So, any guesses?

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10 minutes ago, Bob Leone said:

Lol, no offense. Maybe I should have stated that.

 

I just found out about this longest year yesterday and I thought it would be fun to share.

 

So, any guesses?

I figured I had the wrong answer, but it was worth it. I'm horrible at riddles. Um... 😳🤔 Either the numbers write long, or it adds up or something. 

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2 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

Wait, 1972!  (I looked it up myself.)

🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 Looked it up. Two seconds! 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

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Okay here's the answer copied from Wikipedia: 

 

 Julius Caesar added two extra leap months to recalibrate the calendar in preparation for his calendar reform, which went into effect in 45 BC. This year therefore had 445 days, and was nicknamed the annus confusionis ("year of confusion") and serves as the longest recorded year in human history.

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2 minutes ago, Bob Leone said:

Okay here's the answer copied from Wikipedia: 

 

 Julius Caesar added two extra leap months to recalibrate the calendar in preparation for his calendar reform, which went into effect in 45 BC. This year therefore had 445 days, and was nicknamed the annus confusionis ("year of confusion") and serves as the longest recorded year in human history.

        That year was longest legalistically, but not astronomically. 

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So, Google, Wikipedia, and astronomy are having an argument, and I just started the beginning of as really bad joke. 😜😋

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1 hour ago, William D'Andrea said:

That year was longest legalistically, but not astronomically. 

 

Astronomically,  *arm twisted behind him* you are correct!😉

Edited by Bob Leone
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23 hours ago, Bob Leone said:

Okay here's the answer copied from Wikipedia: 

 

 Julius Caesar added two extra leap months to recalibrate the calendar in preparation for his calendar reform, which went into effect in 45 BC. This year therefore had 445 days, and was nicknamed the annus confusionis ("year of confusion") and serves as the longest recorded year in human history.

Reminds me of something I read a long time ago. Something with malfunction of the calendar during September of 1700 something. Something like two weeks went missing and half of the population was asleep for two weeks. (You’ll have to google it. This is in no terms correct)

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33 minutes ago, Sarah Daffy said:

Something like two weeks went missing and half of the population was asleep for two weeks.

The eleven days are the ‘lost’ 11 days of September 1752, skipped when Britain changed over from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, bringing us into line with most of Europe. There remained the problem of aligning the calendar in use in England with that in use in Europe. It was necessary to correct it by 11 days: the ‘lost days’. It was decided that Wednesday 2nd September 1752 would be followed by Thursday 14th September 1752. There were claims of civil unrest and rioters demanding “Give us our eleven days” 

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