Jump to content

Welcome to Christian Writers!

We are a friendly community built around Christian writing, publishing, reading and fellowship. Register or sign in today to join in the fun!
Johne

The Most Important Skill You Can Develop

Recommended Posts

You know, I was giving this some thought, and it's unbelievable how many manuscripts get started, but not finished. I wonder why that is?  Is it lack of interest, lack of staying power, writer's block, the sudden realization that it really wasn't a good idea to start it or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

You know, I was giving this some thought, and it's unbelievable how many manuscripts get started, but not finished. I wonder why that is? 

Steven Pressfield would say it's Resistance but I'm still not exactly sure what that is. I think there are any number of factors but if I had to hazard a guess, I'd probably point toward a finite interest in the hard work necessary to learn and execute a novel. Because it's a lot, and it's not for everyone. I think people are slow to give up their romantic ideas about what it's like to be a writer. (It's not that romantic.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it was having buns of steel.  Because, that's seemingly what it takes, physically.

 

My first (and, thus far, only book) took me about 8 months to write - 420 pages published.  Then when I delivered, the publishing company finally revealed to me that they only budgeted for 200.  Those were fun discussions...

 

But, yeah, finishing what you started is a biggie.  The set of books I am working on now started over a decade ago.  After finishing book 1, I tried getting is published with no takers.  So I put it away.  Then, for some reason, I pumped out book 4 in the series - for no good reason - and I started back up again.  Now I'm revising book 1.  I'm nearing the completion of the first draft, hopefully before the end of January.  I find that once you get into a routine, or make it a habit, finishing isn't an issue.

 

I disagree about the investment in the amount of work it takes being an inhibitor to completion.  I sit there all of the time second-guessing my writing, looking at the stack of rejection letters I received on my first go-around.  The I ask myself, "What's the point of this if no one wants to publish it?"  If I want to talk to myself, I'll do that in front of the bathroom mirror with far less investment.  I think the biggest roadblock is lack of confidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Jeff Potts said:

I think the biggest roadblock is lack of confidence.

 

You know, I forgot that one!

 

But that doesn't seem to be an issue with me.  I've got to say, although the buns of steel is right!  I tend to agree with Johne, though:

38 minutes ago, Johne said:

I think people are slow to give up their romantic ideas about what it's like to be a writer. (It's not that romantic.)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

 

But that doesn't seem to be an issue with me.  I've got to say, although the buns of steel is right!  I tend to agree with Johne, though:

 

 

Heh!  After writing nothing but code for the last 30 years, and dealing with similar code-monkeys, writing fiction is romantic.  😁

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just read the article. Yup. It's hard. And sticking with something--anything--that takes work is hard. 

 

One of the reasons I haven't done much with fiction is that the fun is in the fluid imagination. I bet if you asked even the greatest writers if their finished story was as good as the one they first envisioned they would all agree that the published version wasn't anything like as great as the thoughts in their head of what it 'could' be.

Plus, once you do pin it down and cement it, the experience changes, dramatically. At this point in my life, I've learned to love editing and Story Grid thinking and actually prefer it most of the time now, but that didn't come easy at first.

But even I would rather be a stay-at-home editor than the in-your-face marketer who has to hawk my wares. 

Finishing requires a dramatically different skill set that is anathema to my creative side. To be someone with a great idea/story and who can sell it well and gracefully is a rare thing indeed. 

Of course, today I can be a published author just by learning a touch of Word formatting and throwing something up on Amazon. I just don't make any money without the marketing.

 

BTW, you can check out my eBook if you like... 😉 https://www.amazon.com/Mysteries-Time-Creation-Short-Intro-ebook/dp/B011T13IL6/

Edited by Celebrianne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Audiences bring their own experiences to the art and add to the layers of meaning that the artist has infused into it. Through sharing, the art becomes more complex and meaningful.

Community.  What a wonderful thing it is if it gives art substance!

 

I've finished manuscripts.  That part isn't difficult.  All the business stuff stops me from the final push into the community: money to pay for all the bells and whistles, time to interact with the lovely people.  Thanks to all you lovely people, at least I'm not short on savvy! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Paradoxically, the best way to reach a goal is to forget about the goal itself and focus on the process—the small, concrete steps that, if taken often enough, will inevitably get you there.

Journey over destination. Process over outcome. Virtue over goal.  New Year's Virtue

I found this in an article by Nick Wignall Psychologist.  Our virtue in this feed is finishing what we start.  We are concentrating on the small, concrete steps to finishing a manuscript and putting it in front of an audience.  

God bless us with perseverance and connections! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, to quote the eminent philosopher Charles Del Mar, as it relates to learning how to ski:

 

"Go down that hill, real fast.  If something gets in your way - turn!"

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.