Jump to content

Welcome to Christian Writers!

We are a friendly community built around Christian writing, publishing, reading and fellowship. Register or sign in today to join in the fun!
Nicola

Douglas Bond: God Sings

Recommended Posts

Douglas Bond: God Sings. As a musician, I agree with his final assessment, that folk singing is for folks.  He refers to the ‘congregational instrument’.

 Music in general is the language of Heaven, but, natural, simple, gently accompanied singing moves a soul deeper into God’s presence.  We need simple while we still tread the cursed sod. 

 

Bond

[excerpt from God Sings! (And Ways We Think He Ought To)

...many worship songs... were first composed for a solo voice, usually the lead vocalist in a band. In the church service, the worship leader becomes the lead vocalist, usually attempting to make his voice sound like the pop entertainer’s voice who first popularized the new song. This can be difficult, even entirely inaccessible, for untrained voices of the congregation to imitate. Allow me to switch from popular to higher-culture singing to illustrate the point.

 

 

Imagine trying to sing like Luciano Pavarotti, the “king of the high C’s” as he was known. Imagine him leading worship. Imagine trying to follow his booming tenor. Though he was one of the greatest tenors of all time, and could do astounding things with his highly trained instrument, his voice, almost nobody in the congregation has the capability to follow his leading. We would be inclined not to sing. We would want to listen, not mess up his performance. What is more, we would be wholly embarrassed to attempt to sing like an opera singer. Our neighbors would think we were putting on an affected manner of singing. They would be correct. Whether we appreciate opera or not, even those of us who do, do not think it would be appropriate to try to make our congregational singing sound like Francis Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites.

 

But that brings up the question: Why is it that we have wholly embraced the popular entertainer’s voice and ethos but not an opera singer’s ethos? Why would it be inappropriate and unworkable to pattern our corporate worship singing after the music in Handel’s Messiah, or Mendelsohn’s Elijah?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember a worship leader who was a session drummer on the side. I couldn't put my finger on what was wrong until he let someone else on the drums during service while he led the choir.

 

So we built a transparent screen in front of the drum kit and slipped a blanket into the bass drum. Problem solved!

 

I sing bass. Not baritone. They put me in the "dead spot" because I don't need a microphone to project. It's a good thing I have an ear for harmony because the "pop singer" style is impossible for me.  So there are times when the Holy Spirit is telling me to be still, that I have nothing edifying to contribute.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, EClayRowe said:

So there are times when the Holy Spirit is telling me to be still, that I have nothing edifying to contribute.

It is they who have nothing edifying to contribute!  Your contribution is too edifying for them to receive with grace, and I honour your humility for listening to the Spirit of Grace who doesn’t force grace on us! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bass singers in a choir are like tubas in an orchestra.

 

"Who's an octave below the written note?"

 

Me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bass singers keep everyone rooted in tempo and pitch!  A choir without bass is like a building without foundation.  Jesus might have given a parable about this instead of sand and rock!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  ,

Like the bass player in the modern combo.

 

I tried to include "Every Valley Shall Be Exalted!" in a Christmas program once. There's more good stuff in Handel's "Messiah" than the "Hallelujah Chorus." But the general consensus was, "...too operatic."

 

And how many Christian artists incorporate classic hymns into their songs now, or re-arrange them for pop sensibilities?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/8/2019 at 2:37 PM, suspensewriter said:

You know, I feel ashamed, but I'm tone deaf!

 

Just think how amazed you will be when you hear heaven's choir of harmony? YES!!! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.