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Book Marketing VS. Book Selling

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Interesting, but I also think contradicting.

 

She said "the thing that markets your book isn't always the same thing that sells your book." 

 

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I've always been taught (in business) that there needs to be a correlation between marketing and sales. Otherwise you're wasting time and money. 

 

She pumps visibility and yet cites examples of how being visible (like on Dr. Phil) never did anything for sales. Maybe spend less time trying to book with Dr. Phil and find the outlets that reaches your readers? That's the visibility that pays off. 

 

I think finding and connecting to your readers is what marketing is all about. That's the real challenge. That's what drives me crazy, anyway. :D   

 

 

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I think inexperienced persons should not offer advice. And those who add confusing terms or invent words should be banned. But back to the subject.

 

When my company has a new book in progress, we announce it in all the usual (for us) places. That is marketing or letting people know to watch out for it. We of course post it in our web store for pre-orders. Good covers sell books. A bad cover is off-putting.

 

Prior to the internet, the amount of books published in the US was the size of the Great Lakes, now it's the size of all the oceans combined. How does anyone find it aside from family and friends?

 

Independent bookstores are doing well in the US while chains are barely holding on. I think the situation with the chains is stabilizing according to the information I have from the book trade. And it is possible to go to the local chain bookstore and convince the manager to carry a handful of copies. And perhaps even set up a small table so the author can meet and talk to buyers. Stores used to make it possible for the author to give a short talk for nonfiction titles.

 

One might think that after all the hard work is done and the book is out, it's up to the publisher to promote it. In the case of a six figure deal (yes, they do happen), the publisher will promote it but in other cases, likely a blurb in Publishers Weekly. Think about it. You are standing in line behind thousands - literally - of other writers who want their manuscript turned into a book.

 

So, what to do? Research. Ask yourself: If I was looking for a book that fell into whatever category, where would I go? How would I find it?

Edited by robg213
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14 hours ago, Accord64 said:

Maybe spend less time trying to book with Dr. Phil and find the outlets that reaches your readers? That's the visibility that pays off

I think she is trying to say without actually saying the statistic that it takes seven times of viewing something before the average person even pays attention to a new products. (I think) 

 

8 hours ago, robg213 said:

Ask yourself: If I was looking for a book that fell into whatever category, where would I go? How would I find it?

I like this simplistic question that makes you think! 

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8 hours ago, robg213 said:

Independent bookstores are doing well in the US while chains are barely holding on.

 

I think that this is severely misleading.  Those independent bookstores that were doing well before Amazon, are doing marginally well.  All the other independents went belly up.

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9 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Those independent bookstores that were doing well before Amazon, are doing marginally well.

 

As with any large company, chains can get bogged down with corporate directives that can be tone-deaf to local markets. They're told to push books that corporate has negotiated deals with major publishers. Probably good prices, but usually not what the local market really wants. 

 

Independent bookstores have the advantage of reading local markets and reacting faster - if they're well managed. I suspect those stores that went belly-up had trouble understanding what their customers wanted.

 

I think the future of bookstores is in-store POD. Find your book on their website (which has just about anything), or walk-in order, and watch it printed while you enjoy a cup of coffee. It's literally hot off the press. 

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I don't think POD at a bookstore is the future. For years the book trade press was announcing, over and over again, the death of the printed book. Those 'invent the future' types were wrong plus they are interested in pushing people to their online outlets and services.

 

About amazon. Amazon was not profitable for a very long time. They started out with a simple idea: sell books at a discount and that was it. They then added other items to sell besides books. Who doesn't want to pay less? Who doesn't want a bargain?

19 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

 

I think that this is severely misleading.  Those independent bookstores that were doing well before Amazon, are doing marginally well.  All the other independents went belly up.

 

Careful of superlatives without backup. Cite some references to get an accurate picture.

 

Print book sales:

https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/financial-reporting/article/78929-print-unit-sales-increased-1-3-in-2018.html

 

https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/independent-bookstores-growing-in-the-us/4878283.html

 

 

I encourage looking at multiple news sources before making any, especially dramatic, statements. If we can get good data, learn a little recent history and keep our heads, we can learn what we need to know. Older news is that about 49% of ebook authors are making $500.00 or less per year.

 

 

Edited by robg213
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19 hours ago, Becky Bradley said:

Thank you for your insight.  It is especially appreciated since it is coming from someone who is working inside the business.

 

You're welcome.

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1 hour ago, robg213 said:

I encourage looking at multiple news sources before making any, especially dramatic, statements.

 I agree, however looking at the source you quoted...

 

1 hour ago, robg213 said:

 

"Unit sales of print books rose 1.3% in 2018 over 2017 at outlets that report to NPD BookScan."

 

My problem with these reports is that they generally cite data collected only from publishers or retailers. They hardly ever report on independently published material, which also includes eBook & Audiobook subscription services. These have become significant market drivers over the past few years.  

 

Amazon, the largest seller of independently published material, doesn't make this data public. It's difficult to really know the overall trends, not just those that the major publishers (& bookstores) want us to know.      

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There is more information out there. Assuming there isn't is one problem. And assuming the worst is the other. Audio books is a growth area. I suggest you find the information you're looking for as opposed to making unsupported statements.

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