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Nicholas Reicher

Bible Factoid - often neglected Bible tools!

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Let's talk about Bible tools most people don't seem to have. There are some tools I used to use a lot in the past, others I use more.

 

There's no getting around Logos - When you invest in that program and simply type in a bible verse, bible reference range or a search term, Logos does all of this automatically.

 

For those of you who can't afford Logos (there's a free version, btw) and have to do it by hand - you need first of all a topical bible.

 

Topical Bibles list all the verses on a single topic. I wouldn't say all of them - Nave was a modernist who denied Hell, so he actually left out a lot of references to it in a stubborn attempt to prove there wasn't a Hell.

 

When you're looking up Tithe, one would do well to look it up in a topical bible or two - I recommend Torrey's. John MacArthur also has one out, but I've never purchased it.

 

Another one is Bible Harmonies. Many people think they exist only for the Gospels, but actually there's harmonies of Paul's letters, Kings/Chronicles/Samuel, etc.

 

Books of verse references are rare - and none more famous than the Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge. Try it.

 

What do few people have in their homes? Aside from stamp collections and giant robots, many do not own systematic theologies. I recommend them - especially if you own Logos. They turbocharge your studies. Want to study the teachings of the Bible but don't know where to start? Open a systematic theology, a Bible, and a commentary. Read the systematic theology, reference the verses in the Bible, and read the commentary on the verses.

 

What could be simpler? Well, Logos of course. Don't forget to record your findings!

 

Try it. Look up Perseverance of the saints - give me one Bible verse that teaches this doctrine right off the top of your head. Give you a hint - almost every one of you have it memorized.

 

If you can't think of one, start studying.

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 Nicholas Reicher, it's very difficult to think of someone with a full volume on systematic theology as a nerd?

Yes, probably a scholar, but not a nerd. I bought the 7 or 8 text books "Systematic Theology for my husband when we were at Seminary.  The only two other books I would recommend are a Greek Lexicon and a good Hebrew translator. I find Hebrew so difficult. just adding a dot under a letter can change the meaning of an entire sentence.  ugh?

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Hebrew to me is really easy. Maybe its genetics.

 

Lexicons is where we start getting into the advanced. That's also where grammars and interlinears come in.

 

Everyone can use a systematic theology - it's really one step up from a topical bible.

 

Really, if you want a complete list, I'd be adding a list of recommended commentaries, along with hardbound Christian confessions such as the 1689 London Baptist confession of faith, Westminster Confession, and of course an endless list of grammars. 

 

Trying to keep this easy and affordable. My Logos wish list has over $16,000 worth of texts in it. I'll need to sell a screenplay or hit the best sellars list to make a dent in that.

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14 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Uh-oh!  This just shows me that I have to get studying! (although Ephesians 6:18 should do, I still need to study)

Hint...what's one Bible text almost every christian memorizes right away? This is your answer.

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29 minutes ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

Hebrew to me is really easy. Maybe its genetics.

I grew up in a large Jewish community and even occasionally attended Hebrew School and Temple with my girl friends. I wonder if it is because math is so difficult for me that I struggle so with Hebrew. What would you recommend for someone like me, who is older, admires and loves the Jewish reverence for God, but needs help sometimes when using Hermeneutics, (i can't believe spell check didn't even have this word!), before a group bible study I lead for women? (You would be amazed how many mother's don't know the significance of rod and staff.)

 

MaryKaithe

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Now I have a difficult question for any LOR, Tolkienites out there?

 

Many people today, who have only seen the movies, have missed out on the extensive length JRR went to in developing this world and its “ages”. I do find the earlier books, ie, the Silmarillion,  particularly difficult to read, but think that is perhaps due to my lack of knowledge of formal “Brittish” English. Still, I slug through all of them. I am deeply grateful to Christopher for assembling his father’s notes and treating us all to that glorious world Tolkien created.

 

I am aware that Tolkien insisted and was even offended by attempts from the Christian community to equate his created world with allegorical properties to his faith. My question is concerning the “ages” he creates, even the basic creation of EO in the details of creating  middle-earth. I have read Tolkien was a devout Catholic, and even criticized Lewis for dabbling into “Theology”. But doesn’t the “ages” JRR refers to seem awfully close to Dispensational Theology? I thought Dispensationalism was a 19th-century development and would not have aligned with Catholic Doctrine? Or am I way off base, as many become who attempt to turn Middle-Earth into a likeness to our Christian Movement on our Earth?

 

I know both Lewis and JRR felt a deep lack of history and legend in the English culture due to the lack of the Angs, development of written language.  Just curious what you experts might know on the subject.

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I needed to post this as a new topic so I am reposting (real word?) it. Sorry...

 

Now I have a difficult question for any LOR, Tolkienites out there?

 

Many people today, who have only seen the movies, have missed out on the extensive length JRR went to in developing this world and its “ages”. I do find the earlier books, ie, the Silmarillion,  particularly difficult to read, but think that is perhaps due to my lack of knowledge of formal “Brittish” English. Still, I slug through all of them. I am deeply grateful to Christopher for assembling his father’s notes and treating us all to that glorious world Tolkien created.

 

I am aware that Tolkien insisted and was even offended by attempts from the Christian community to equate his created world with allegorical properties to his faith. My question is concerning the “ages” he creates, even the basic creation of EO in the details of creating  middle-earth. I have read Tolkien was a devout Catholic, and even criticized Lewis for dabbling into “Theology”. But doesn’t the “ages” JRR refers to seem awfully close to Dispensational Theology? I thought Dispensationalism was a 19th-century development and would not have aligned with Catholic Doctrine? Or am I way off base, as many become who attempt to turn Middle-Earth into a likeness to our Christian Movement on our Earth?

 

I know both Lewis and JRR felt a deep lack of history and legend in the English culture due to the lack of the Angs, development of written language.  Just curious what you experts might know on the subject.

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20 minutes ago, MaryKaithe said:

I grew up in a large Jewish community and even occasionally attended Hebrew School and Temple with my girl friends. I wonder if it is because math is so difficult for me that I struggle so with Hebrew. What would you recommend for someone like me, who is older, admires and loves the Jewish reverence for God, but needs help sometimes when using Hermeneutics, (i can't believe spell check didn't even have this word!), before a group bible study I lead for women? (You would be amazed how many mother's don't know the significance of rod and staff.)

 

MaryKaithe

Everyone needs help with hermeneutics - it doesn't come easily for everyone.

 

I've always recommended the first adult hebrew primer (third edition) for anyone trying to learn Hebrew. In conjunction with that, get a used siddur (can be Ari or just regular ashkenazi) and get used to reading along in the Hebrew. The more time you spend with your eyes on Hebrew, the easier.

 

I don't recommend classes, just because they are aimed at the median student. Quick learners get bored, struggling students get discouraged.

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Opinions on Tolkien on this board always erupt in arguments. I'll stay out of them.

I think if there's any similarity between dispensationalism and tolkien, it's coincidence. Downright eerie ones, but coincidence.

 

Catholic teachings do not agree with dispensationalism, to answer your question on it. Dispensationalism technically is a couple of thousand years old, but because of differing methods of interpretation it was actually forgotten before Darby resurrected it.

 

It was Clarence Larkin who brought it out of obscurity, and further pushed by Sperry Chafer. By the time Dallas Theological Seminary had started, many christians grasped onto it as the key to a grammatical, literal normal understanding of the scriptures.

 

Tolkiens' ages were determined by the ascendant race in his mythos, the first age being the age of elves, then the second age being the days of the struggles of elves and ascending man (Elrond being one of the forerunners of this age), and finally, the third age was the age where the elves began to look back across the sea as man spread far and wide, becoming the dominant group.

 

it roughly parallels the dispensational ages, but those reflect the way in which God deals with man rather than ascendant groups. There are seven dispensational ages, of which we are in the fifth one.

 

Anyone else want to take a shot at it?

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Thank you for your insight. I would not argue with you about anything you have said, but never looked at the progressive ages in LOR and ascendant ages. I knew Tolkien was trying to fill in an historical lapse of legend for the British people. I often used the Angs as an example for my students of the importance of written language. They were usually quite convinced about learning to read after that.  I also used LOR to teach my "Special Education" students who read only at a 3rd grade level. They worked so hard to read each book. Was a wonderful  teaching experience for us all.  

 

Funny story - I actually had a student so convinced that LOR was real, when he returned from summer break he came back to tell me he actually had found an original copy of the "Red Book." I didn't dissuade him. I felt his belief in the Literature was a giant leap toward higher level reading and thinking.  I am a firm believer that where one road, or dendrite in the brain, may be disabled, new roads, or connections can be made.

 

Marykaithe

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On 9/5/2019 at 6:50 PM, Nicholas Reicher said:

When you're looking up Tithe, one would do well to look it up in a topical bible or two - I recommend Torrey's. John MacArthur also has one out, but I've never purchased it.

Another topical bible is the Sword Study Bible published by Whitaker House.  I have the KJV version, but I believe there's also a KJVER version.  I have the giant print value edition which runs for around $25 on Amazon.  There's no gilding and no ribbon, but it has an excellent marginal study system that leads you from one verse to the next in your topical study.  Both the words of Jesus as well as God are red lettered.  All other study materials (except the names of God in Hebrew plus tricky words explained) along with a 280+ page concordance are located in the back.  It's a very robust bible.

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On 9/6/2019 at 9:02 PM, Neal said:

KJVER

Stuck. I've never seen this acronym before.

King James version Emergency response?

King James Version emulsion rinse?

KJV Educated risk?

 

I know I'm going to palm my forehead the moment you explain it!

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53 minutes ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

Stuck. I've never seen this acronym before.

King James version Emergency response?

King James Version emulsion rinse?

KJV Educated risk?

 

I know I'm going to palm my forehead the moment you explain it!

Apparently it means King James Version Easy Read/ing.

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