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Good afternoon everyone (or maybe some other time of day for everyone else). As you can tell from the title, this post is about love. 
In my novel, I desire to add some romance between certain characters, but I don’t want it to be too graphical or awful, if you know what I mean. The novel is not a romance so I just want this to be a side thing and not to big because I don’t have any experience with writing romance. So any advice would be great to wether I should even add some romance and how to add it in a healthy way.

Hope that makes sense. Have a great day.

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I don't think you need to create the literary equivalent of those Bollywood movies where the hero and heroine always kiss behind a tree, etc. to keep your story good, clean Christian fiction. Since it sounds like a romance is not the driving force of your story, I think it would be easy to keep "private" scenes out. 
But there's a whole lot more to a romantic relationship than sex, whether it is a brand new one, or one that's been simmering for decades.
To tell the truth, I would imagine you are in greater danger of writing a love scene that seems contrived, or sappy, than one that's inappropriate.

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Touching a shoulder, flashing "that" smile, a "honey" or "sweetheart," little things can imply a romance without getting too deep. 

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Posted (edited)
On 8/19/2019 at 12:53 PM, E. Millennium said:

add it in a healthy way

This is a great little phrase. I think two characters coming together for a romance is great, but you are right that there are ways to do it healthily. A few thoughts - 

 

1) The romance should not be presented as the "meaning of life" so to speak. God's purpose for our lives may involve romance, but it is not the reason to live and breathe - He is.

 

2) The two characters should be able to interact as friends. By that I mean, they are compatible personally and act as such; they are not just drawn to each other because they both think the other is cute.

 

3) Romance can be written without graphic scenes. Moments where characters support and understand each other emotionally, are shown to have common backstories or complementary character traits that make them be able to learn from and comfort one another, are far more powerful than showing physical intimacy for the sake of showing physical intimacy. 

Edited by PenName
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All the above post are great advice.

Less is definitely best. Leave it up to your reader to work things out.

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I'd suggest trying not to introduce a character just to be the love interest. I think it is better to introduce both characters independently first, maybe they are both attempting to address the problem of the plot from different directions and eventually cross paths in working towards the same goal. In the process of working together they grow close and come to love each other. If the relationship develops around the plot it can be shown and grown in that context while not having to use escalating physical intimacy to do so. 

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