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Homer Les

ProWritingAid vs. Grammarly

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Hello everyone, as noob writers Wanda and I are being slowly sucked into the Sarlacc pit of editing. We realize our work lacks professional editing so we are trying to do as much on our own as possible. To assist we have downloaded the trial version of ProWritingAid which seems to be very impressive. However, before we purchase, we want to know if anyone here has experience with Grammarly and can effectively compare it with ProWritingAid. If anyone can help us with this comparison we would be very appreciative.

 

Thank you very much.

Homer Les

www.uncompromisingfaith.ca

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I actually use both. I have dyslexia, and Grammarly helps with my everyday post and as a great starting point for editing. I can easily use this at the end of every writing session for spelling and comma checks. This dramatically cuts down on editing time later. 

 

Prowritingaid helps with this also, but also with filter words, consistency check, passive voice, sticky sentences, and more. (Things Grammarly does not do) This is an amazing tool, and it helps teach you along the way. 

 

However, if using both, you will find that they are sometimes in disagreement over things like commas. Still, well worth the money!!!!!! 

 

Keep in mind these are no replacement for a professional editor but will greatly help you cut down on the cost of professional editing. 

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Thank you for the concise help Alley. That really helps us. We are still planning to have a copy editor go over the manuscript. We just don't feel right about handing them some limping scrod only a mother could love plus our budget is limited. We have seen what ProWritingAid can do and so far are very impressed. Glad to know it does a bit more than Grammarly.

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Hi Homer

 

I use ProWriteAid to and also have dyslexia.

 

I wish I had discover the software years ago. It as Ally says it a very good tool for any kind of writing. I have certainly found it has improved my novel writing tremendously.   The great thing about PWA is you can use it when writing emails or a post as I am doing now. It also helps with editing as it will identify words you can cut out and highlights passive writing.

Definitely recommend it. Worth every penny

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Thank you. Much obliged. Just curious as to how you use PWA for blog postings. I only have the plugin in Word at the moment. Is there an addin for the browser as well?

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Not sure. Check the website. It seemed to download itself and attach to the web browser as I can use it all the time in word and on the net.

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You can write your post in a document and transfer it over if you'd like. I have a Chromebook, and PWA is an extension. You can use it anywhere. Although PWA does not seem to work on my phone. 🙁  But Grammarly does. Which is another reason I have both. Oh, and a plus side, PWA has a lifetime option. (I bought that) Or you can try it out for a year and see how you like it. 

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Personal prejudice all the way here.

 

When I tried the free trial for Grammarly, I was given a free week. It did well with Chapter 1. When I plugged in Chapter 2, it went back to Chapter 1. I asked for help through emails, and spent the next 6 days telling the helpers, "I can't help that it shouldn't do that. It did that." My entire experience with Grammarly.

 

I "rented" PWA for a year. (They call it "buying," but if you're renewing every year, it's a rental.)

 

I bought it as a Christmas present to myself in 2015. Still love it. (Mine, until I upgrade my computer, so really bought it.)

 

Commas and I do not get along. We don't understand each other. But PWA fixes it for me. It also catch things like "He" was used to start a sentence three sentences in a row. (Never noticed.) It taught me my too-often-used-word list, albeit, my MC's name has to be used often. And it notifies me when a sentence uses nothing-but-common words. Very cool!

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Awesome! Thank you. Wanda has a secret love affair with commas and semicolons. I am hoping PWA will help wean her off of them. 😀 For my part, I am a minimalist writer, eschewing punctuation for narrative. I prefer to get the thoughts and words out then edit the life into them later. Makes for more work on the back end but tends to alleviate writers block. 😀

 

Thank you for the info. It is much appreciated.

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I have Grammarly and Ginger, but frankly I prefer Ginger.  It does all that Grammarly does, and its extra features are just plain fantastic.  For example, it does text-to-speech so that, while doing something else, you can hear your manuscript.  And it does translation to 60 other languages, too!

 

So anyway, I prefer Ginger.

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I have never heard of Ginger. That is awesome! What caught me was the translations. I am very interested in that. We have two translation teams working on the Chinese and Afrikaans version of our book already and I am curious how, or if, Ginger ma y help.

 

Thank you!!!

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12 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

Ginger

I have to look this up now! 😃 

 

53 minutes ago, Homer Les said:

Wanda has a secret love affair with commas and semicolons

That's great! That will be an amazing help as you edit! 

 

I have a love-hate relationship with commas. I hate them, and they love to make me hate them. 😋

 

You do know we have a critique section here where you can receive help from many writers. It is a system of helping each other, and there are a few rules, but nothing hard and it is a fantastic help!! 

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Thank you Alley. I appreciate all the help we receive here. I think I need to wait a while before I can get into the critique forum as we are still wet behind the ears. 😁 When we are able we will certainly will take advantage of the help. We find that certain passages are a bit tricky, even with mechanical help. Being able to post those may help us get past sections of editing that defy our understanding.

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BTW suspensewriter, do you have any idea if the Ginger translate option is better than Google or Office translate? I am really curious because every time I send a tranche of Google translated chapters to my Afrikaans translator she gets hit with the giggles. She says I wouldn't understand because I don't speak the language which is fair. I would, however, like to give her a translated version that is less 'humorous' 😄 and would make her translation editing/proofing job easier. Thank you for the great suggestion on Ginger!

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7 minutes ago, Homer Les said:

think I need to wait a while before I can get into the critique forum as we are still wet behind the ears

You could still stop in and read some of them. It might help you both to not feel so overwhelmed when you jump in. 🙂

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I saw this and thought it might help. I've not watched it, but I do know this lady is highly thought of for her writing advice. 

 

 

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Ginger sounds like a hit and I want to learn more about it. 

 

I have a polyglottal character who jumps from one language to another. A crucial phrase in his test of an artificial intelligence system is in Laotian, but I may change it to Vietnamese because of something I read on Quora about information density.

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Posted (edited)

WhiteSmoke? As in the Eighties hair band?

 

Two-point-five stars out of five at the Google Play Store. No thanks!

Edited by EClayRowe
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