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Spaulding

The Lord vs. Trad. Pub.

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Or you could self-publish and all this becomes moot.

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On 6/10/2019 at 5:24 PM, Johne said:

Or you could self-publish and all this becomes moot.

Two reasons I wanted to be trad. pub. --

1. I wanted to know if it was good enough.

2. Trad. pub. means books land on shelves sometimes.

 

Still deciding on the first, but I know how to find out if it is good enough another way.

 

Discovering ways to get it on book shelves anyway.

 

It's becoming more of an option. I figure the Lord will let me know when it's time to go at it again.

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8 hours ago, Spaulding said:

Two reasons I wanted to be trad. pub. --

1. I wanted to know if it was good enough.

2. Trad. pub. means books land on shelves sometimes.


I get that. For myself, what I don't have is the time to wait for a manuscript to snake its way through a Trad Pub slushpile. When I'm ready to publish, I intend to publish while writing the next thing.

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20 hours ago, Spaulding said:

Two reasons I wanted to be trad. pub. --

1. I wanted to know if it was good enough.

2. Trad. pub. means books land on shelves sometimes.

 

1. I would caution you on using this to judge the value of your work. Most agents/publishers won't reply to queries (as a form of rejection), or won't give you any useful feedback if they do formally reject. The real reasons could be anything, and mostly nothing to do with your manuscript being "good enough." You could have a great manuscript, and yet easily come to an opposite conclusion based on rejections from the traditional publishing world. I'd seek input from an editor and a team of beta-readers.

 

2. The key word is sometimes. Actually, if you can manage to land a traditional publishing deal, your book might never (or briefly) see the inside of a bookstore. Shelf space competition is even more intense than landing a traditional publishing deal, unless your book does well out of the gate. Remember, there are new worlds of distribution (like eBooks & online print book sales - think Amazon) that have been putting brick-and-mortar stores out of business.

         

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On 6/13/2019 at 8:21 AM, Accord64 said:

 

1. I would caution you on using this to judge the value of your work. Most agents/publishers won't reply to queries (as a form of rejection), or won't give you any useful feedback if they do formally reject. The real reasons could be anything, and mostly nothing to do with your manuscript being "good enough." You could have a great manuscript, and yet easily come to an opposite conclusion based on rejections from the traditional publishing world. I'd seek input from an editor and a team of beta-readers.

 

2. The key word is sometimes. Actually, if you can manage to land a traditional publishing deal, your book might never (or briefly) see the inside of a bookstore. Shelf space competition is even more intense than landing a traditional publishing deal, unless your book does well out of the gate. Remember, there are new worlds of distribution (like eBooks & online print book sales - think Amazon) that have been putting brick-and-mortar stores out of business.

         

1. Already finished querying and didn't land an agent. BUT, I did get three close-but-no-cigars. One said she came very close, but it just didn't hit her LOVE-IT level. I get that, and no hurt feelings. (Actually did give me a sense that it was good-enough.)

 

2. And since I'm done querying, I already went through beta-readers too. One beta-reader has published three books traditionally before I beta-read his fifth, and he beta-read mine. Another is a magazine editor by day, and author by night. (She's long since published the book I beta-read too.)

 

Not quite sure where to go from here. Since it was the first-of-seven, I'm trying to figure out how to write Book Two now. (First chapter in Book 1 started with just one character and built up to a community of characters. Now floundering because Book Two starts with MC and buddies bringing home 6000 others to the new community they call home. No idea how to handle eight named characters leading that caravan. o_O)

 

I figure once I get Book Two written and then reworked, it's time to bring in a paid editor. But, still stuck on what then? I'm not sure if this counts for the Christian market, since the concept of God isn't even brought up until the second book. (Didn't we only think about God after we ran out of every other choice? Isn't that about how we ended up coming to him half the time? And, all along, God planned that to happen, so placed just the right people around us to help us "find" Him? xD) So, I'm not sure if it fits into the Christian Market. I figure God will guide me on which way to go once I get that far.

 

As for marketing? Between my college degree and starting my own business years ago, (didn't last because I became disabled just as it was getting into the black), I learned a lot about marketing. I even love marketing, so I have no doubt, if I can get it published, I can sell it.

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5 hours ago, Spaulding said:

Not quite sure where to go from here.


I'd write a complete different novel and let the seven novel set rest for awhile with the idea of coming back to it when you're closer to hitting the big time. Brandon Sanderson wrote five novels before his 'breakout' novel, Elantris. Each time he finished one, he'd take a good hard look at it, ask if it was salable, and then set them aside as he continued to work out his million words of dreck. You can read about his long road to his first publishing break here.

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21 hours ago, Johne said:


I'd write a complete different novel and let the seven novel set rest for awhile with the idea of coming back to it when you're closer to hitting the big time. Brandon Sanderson wrote five novels before his 'breakout' novel, Elantris. Each time he finished one, he'd take a good hard look at it, ask if it was salable, and then set them aside as he continued to work out his million words of dreck. You can read about his long road to his first publishing break here.

I've worked on that first book since 2010. I'm 63 and disabled. There is no career for me. There is this story. 

 

I figure I'll be old by the time it's finished, or in my new body, in which case, cool. xD

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Try writing a few short stories to hone your skills and let this story rest for a bit. Or write short stories that might  be incorporated later into the future ones. 

 

And I might add that a 63 is not that old! You may have many good years ahead of you, disabled or not.

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Been thinking about this thread.  I wonder if 'traditional publishers; also use POD and ebooks to promote their writers books?  If they did not it would seem they are very naïve in thier marketing.

 

Surely all our work is God inspired?

 



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On 6/16/2019 at 5:42 PM, Shamrock said:

Surely all our work is God inspired?

 

I wouldn't over-spiritualize what we do. All scripture is inspired by God but my fiction is inspired by Raymond Chandler and Roger Zelazny. ;)

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You mistake my comment.

 

Of course all writers are influence by others and it shows in their work but ultimately God has a hand in what we do. That's all I meant.

 

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43 minutes ago, Shamrock said:

Of course all writers are influence by others and it shows in their work but ultimately God has a hand in what we do.


Amen. ;)

 

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I'm 64. And Drift grew out of a generation ship/ first contact story that was rejected by four prominent science fiction magazines in 1977 and 1978. (I only had two copies to send out!)

 

I suggest you work on an "elevator pitch." If you had two minutes alone in an elevator with an agent who represents your genre, what would you say?

 

 

 

 

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On 6/16/2019 at 6:19 PM, carolinamtne said:

Try writing a few short stories to hone your skills and let this story rest for a bit. Or write short stories that might  be incorporated later into the future ones. 

 

And I might add that a 63 is not that old! You may have many good years ahead of you, disabled or not.

I started writing this story in 2010. I started writing fiction, (drabbles, character sketches, poetry -- I stink :$ -- short stories, a couple of novellas, and two other attempts at a novel), in the decade before that.

 

I have a degree in Communications that tended towards helping me land jobs that included business writing. After that started my own business where I had a crash course in marketing, which helped me publish a few nonfiction articles. Became disabled, and just could not imagine being stuck with nothing but nonfiction writing after that. (Bummer, because the money was nice.) So this horse jumped midstream, and I'm still somewhere between wet and muddy. 

 

But the marketing background, plus my love of Harry Potter, has helped me get an idea on how to market my heptalogy. I'm not keen on the interactive part of Pottermore, but loved that Rowling added short stories on it. So, I've already written a couple of background stories for a blog for my series. Plan on more. And as the series goes along, I'll add side stories for the different characters that go with the current story. Imagine learning more about Hermione's life away from the story. Or Mrs. Weasley. Or Hagrid.

 

Rowling wanted to move on after HP, and I don't blame her. That was my plan. However, I truly love my characters, (aka also my stuffed animals), so I have no problem writing about them for the rest of my life. And considering one of those novellas and one of the character sketches was about them, it's still holding after 18 years. 

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I'm 56. I have an idea for a series that I'm holding off on until I'm a better writer. If Brandon Sanderson wrote - and discarded - five novels before he hit with Elantris, I think I can write some clunkers before I tackle my magnum opus idea. Maybe it's time to set this series aside, knock out something quick and fun for practice, and then come back to it when you have some more experience under your belt. (And maybe not - it's just an idea.)

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On 6/16/2019 at 6:42 PM, Shamrock said:

Been thinking about this thread.  I wonder if 'traditional publishers; also use POD and ebooks to promote their writers books?  If they did not it would seem they are very naïve in their marketing.

Trad. pub. works in lots of 1000. Either the agent is going to convince the publisher to print 1000 editions, or nothing. If those 1000 sells, they print more. Same thought with traditional publishers, (which are Big Five to small press, but they are publishers.)

 

And, yeah, ebooks are part of the deal now, usually.

 

Neither has to do with promoting their authors though. Anymore, most promotion, especially for first-timers, is done by the author. Unless your book is that one-in-a-billion that sells fast, (or your famous and write a memoir), promoting in trad. pub. only includes:

1. The agent/publisher promoting you on their social media sites.

2. Blurbs in publishing journals.

3. Possibility of getting a blurb in librarian catalogs.

4. Possibility of stellar reviews on famous book review sites.

 

The rest is up to the author.

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18 hours ago, EClayRowe said:

I'm 64. And Drift grew out of a generation ship/ first contact story that was rejected by four prominent science fiction magazines in 1977 and 1978. (I only had two copies to send out!)

 

I suggest you work on an "elevator pitch." If you had two minutes alone in an elevator with an agent who represents your genre, what would you say?

 

Wow! Tall building to take two minutes. xD

 

I have a query and #PitMads, so already have the spiel. (Apparently, I have to find an agent on an long elevator ride too. I wonder if it already happened, and I just didn't know. lol)

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7 hours ago, Spaulding said:

So this horse jumped midstream, and I'm still somewhere between wet and muddy. 

With this kind of analogy, you already have the ability to write. And according your bio above, you've been working at it for a while.

 

Back to the original question, my two cents' worth is that God can use people even when they don't conform to our values. 

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On 6/12/2019 at 7:46 PM, Johne said:

I get that. For myself, what I don't have is the time to wait for a manuscript to snake its way through a Trad Pub slushpile. When I'm ready to publish, I intend to publish while writing the next thing.

 

I agree with you Johne.

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Joy, I hope you'll hop over to Meet and Greet and introduce yourself so everyone will know you are here and can welcome you. :D

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On 6/16/2019 at 2:01 PM, Spaulding said:

 

I figure I'll be old by the time it's finished, or in my new body, in which case, cool.

 

Don't worry- I'm 68 and have a bad case of aphasia.  I had a stroke last year that I am still struggling to recover from and I'm still writing.  Slowly.  I couldn't write at all for the first six months, and then I've been ever so steadily learning to write all over again.  It's hard, but it will be okay.  You've got the right attitude I must say!

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To Suspensewriter:  Maybe God is using your writing to help heal you from your stroke.  Just a thought! I wish you the very best.

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