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Spaulding

The Emotion Thesaurus -- Reference Suggestion

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I usually know what my characters are feeling, but I tend to use the same visual clues too often. I need help with showing it.

 

Enter The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer's Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi. 

I use that more often than I use a dictionary now. One of the few must-haves I can think of for writers. (But don't worry, still piles of you-should-reads left.) Just wanted to let people know about it.

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4 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

I've never heard of it.  I'll get this and report back- it sounds fascinating!

What!?! It's a good one! They also have The Positive Trait Thesaurus, The Negative Trait Thesaurus, The Rural Setting Thesaurus, The Urban Setting Thesaurus, and a new Emotional Wound Thesaurus. I have all of them and love them all! 

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I have to admit, I haven't heard of any of them, but I just bought the first one.  Now I'll have to get the rest.  My library is getting bigger!

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35 minutes ago, suspensewriter said:

My library is getting bigger

Isn't that the way it always goes? ?

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Yep- it is always growing.  Now I just have to find the time to read!  I've started on the Emotion Thesaurus, though.  It's pretty interesting.  At one point I had about three hundred writing books, then I noticed I wasn't reading any of them- I was just collecting them.  Since the stroke, though, I can't seem to get enough of them.  I started out by reading "Save the Cat Writes a Novel" by Jessica Brody; that was pretty good except I really wasn't up to reading by then, I just followed the words!  So, I am going to read it again.  Gradually, I have retained more of what I read, so wish me luck this time around.

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The good news about these thesauruses is that you don't have to read the whole book. You can skip to the emotion you are writing and get the information as needed; unless you are like me and read a recipe book like a novel. ?

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I have this, as well as the Negative Trait and Emotional Wound ones. Plus, I subscribe to their online story outlining resource, which gives you access to all the thesauruses. Highly recommended!

 

I'm a bit (okay, a lot!) of a writing book junkie, so I can easily get how you accumulated 300, @suspensewriter!

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19 hours ago, Alley said:

Isn't that the way it always goes? ?

We're to the point of trying to downsize our library... so we can buy more books. We ran out of room. :$

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21 hours ago, Spaulding said:

I usually know what my characters are feeling, but I tend to use the same visual clues too often. I need help with showing it.

 

Enter The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer's Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi. 

I use that more often than I use a dictionary now. One of the few must-haves I can think of for writers. (But don't worry, still piles of you-should-reads left.) Just wanted to let people know about it.

 

It seems like a useful book for authors who write in English.

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1 hour ago, Lucian Hodoboc said:

It seems like a useful book for authors who write in English.

Actually, I think it could be useful even for other languages, since it describes the body language and facial expressions that often indicate certain emotions.

 

So, for example, if I were writing in Norwegian about a frightened person, instead of just saying saying "Hun var redd," (She was scared), I could choose an appropriate indicator from the thesaurus (face growing pale) and write that in Norwegian instead. "Ansiktet hennes var dødelig blek."

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23 hours ago, carolinamtne said:

I almost bought it. Then I looked, and I already have it. Now to actually USE it!

http://writershelpingwriters.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Emotion-Amplifiers_A-Companion-to-The-Emotion-Thesaurus-2016.pdf     FREE TO DOWNLOAD JUST AMPLIFIER

 

I did buy THE EMOTION THESAURUS and also four other ones in the series: THE NEGATIVE TRAIT THESAURUS, THE POSITIVE TRAIT THESAURUS,  THE RURAL SETTING THESAURUS, THE URBAN SETTING THESAURUS.

 

They are very good references, if you use them. I find myself writing then after I am finished with a chapter going back and  using the helps. 

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I just received my copy in the mail a week or so ago. My plan is to use it during the revising process since my characters do way too much shrugging and eyebrow raising at this point. Why does a shrug mean so many things?!

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16 hours ago, yowordworm said:

Why does a shrug mean so many things?!

Probably related to why some words have so many meanings.

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