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Nicola

Writing Methods for Different Learning Styles

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Writing Methods for Different Learning Styles

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Tips for Visual Learners

 

Use a whiteboard. If you can find a way to have this whiteboard in your line of sight as you write, you'll find this tool particularly helpful. Jot down notes, magnet drawings to the board, do whatever you need to do to visually ground yourself in your writing. This is particularly helpful during the drafting stage. 

 

Use a highlighters/different colored pens. When you go to edit your story, print it out and have at it with colorful writing tools. I tend to color-code my editing notes.
 

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Tips for Auditory Learners

 

Fun fact: Auditory learners also tend to really enjoy speaking as a way of learning. Another fun fact: I cannot retain auditory information to save my life, so this is the learning style I am weakest in.

Record yourself explaining your ideas. You know how you'll be chatting with a friend about a story (or chatting to yourself about a story...No judgement) and you suddenly stumble across a great idea? But then you sit down to write it and don't remember exactly what it was? Yeah. That sucks. To avoid this issue, record your ideas on your phone. Or on an audiorecorder. Or, if you want to be super retro: A tape recorder. Do they even make tape like that anymore? I don't know. Star Lord would be proud of you, though.

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Tips for Tactile Learners 

 

AKA "kinesthetic learners," but kinesthetic is hard for me to spell (and even when I spell it correctly it still looks wrong), so I'm going with tactile. 

 

Use notebooks. Because tactile learners rely on touch and action to learn and create, paper and pen can be very helpful. It grounds us in our writing, keeps us focused, and engages all the senses. However, if you can't write using a notebook (perhaps because of chronic pain, like me), then trying typing on a keyboard. The feel is still there, which is great. As a tactile learner, I think this is why I find dictation difficult for creative writing: I'm lacking the kinesthetic (hey, I spelled it right first try!) aspect that my brain craves.

 

Travel and explore. Writing about the ocean? If you can, go visit a beach! Or at least a large body of water.

These are just samples from the blog post.  

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These are really good ideas, Nicola.  Since my stroke, my kinesthetic sense has gone way down,  and so has my auditory, but my visual learning skill has taken up the slack, so I emphasize this.

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Important to know your learning styles. It makes a difference in how you do things.

 

I made my daughter learn shorthand so she could take notes faster, because that's my learning style. Later she informed me that she's an auditory learning, so taking notes distracts her. She never used the shorthand.

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Oh. Oh, oh, oh! Thank you for this. I always thought I was a visual, with an add-on. I can't do it, unless I try it first on my own. (Lots of amusing stories on how I learned disco in my youth. :$) That's not it. I'm tactile. (And thank you for "tactile," because I have the same problem with that long/wrongly-spelled word. ;))

 

Two problems though:

1. Catholic-school-cursive-writing taught me to write slowly and methodically, (with emphasis on legibility.) So, I think at 5000 wpm (senses running through brain included), I type 45 wpm, and I write 10 wpm. By the time I finish the first half of my sentence, I forgot what the second half was going to be.

2. Hand tremors now. So, even if I do write it, even I can't read it.

 

I do wish keyboards came with raised letters. Feeling the letters on each key would work for me.

 

And, if I had my druthers, I'd be visual. It doesn't matter how close that whiteboard is. That's a lot of standing and sitting in that idea. Who'da thought writing could be exercise?

 

(I'm not just older, I'm old-fashioned. I still haven't seen any particularly good reason to buy a phone to carry around with me and use all the time, so all my typing is done on a keyboard with a desktop. But I'm better than Dad was. He saw no purpose for going online. xD)

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5 hours ago, Spaulding said:

But I'm better than Dad was. He saw no purpose for going online. xD)

This site is a very good reason for going online!

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For auditory learners, the Google Docs app allows voice to text. I use that to take notes or even write scenes. I prefer it to recording and listening to myself later. And with the ease of accessing it on both my phone and laptop, I can quickly copy and paste notes into whatever program I use to write.

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