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Johne

How To Write A Novel In 20 Easy Steps

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https://thewritepractice.com/how-to-write-a-novel/

From the (very lengthy but very solid) post:

1. Get a great idea
2. Write your idea as a premise
3. Set a deadline
4. Set smaller deadlines building to the final deadline
5. Create a consequence
6. Strive for “good enough” and embrace imperfection
7. Figure out what kind of story you’re trying to tell
8. Read novels and watch films that are similar to yours
9. Structure, structure, structure!
10. Find the climactic moment in your novel
11. Consider the conventions
12. Set your intention
13. Picture your reader
14. Build your team
15. Plan the publishing process
16. Write (with low expectations)
17. Trust the process and don’t quit
18. Keep going, even when it hurts
19. Finish Draft One . . . then onward to the next
20. Draft 2, 3, 4, 5
Writers’ Best Tips on How to Write a Novel

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2 hours ago, suspensewriter said:

Where do you come up with all these great finds?


Heh. I'm signed up on a metric ton of writing lists prospecting for nuggets of truth.

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7 hours ago, Accord64 said:

#23 - Go back to #1 because someone said they were easy when they're really not. :rolleyes:

Ahh. I hear ya. It depends. ;)

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On 4/12/2019 at 3:04 PM, Johne said:


8. Read novels and watch films that are similar to yours
 

For Fiction, this should come first. For a Bible commentary, there is a place for waiting until you have struggled with the text alone. I am writing a commentary on Job, and I resolved to not read other commentaries until I had read and reread Job and wrestled with what was being said and prayed for insight. Then I read a few articles touching on points that confused me the most, before resuming my own solitary approach. Only when I had a complete draft did I search out the competing works and read them to see if I had gone off track and made interpretive mistakes. 

 

The benefit of this approach was that when I read all the contradictory scholarship on the book, I had an opinion. I could spot weak arguments and not be swept up in words by people with Phds that might have snowed me with their advanced education and credentials. Also, this gave me space to be creative, to not be pushed in a direction dictated by others and find how the Word could speak to me. I also let myself be guided by my friends' questions (people whom I shared my findings with), making it personal and relevant.

 

The biggest benefit, though, was that when I found some other writers make the same points that I made, use some of the same arguments and reach the same conclusions, I had confirmation not only of the truth of the conclusions, but of my ability to read and understand Scripture. The Perspicuity of Scripture is an important doctrine, but it must be reinforced by experience.

 

Paul

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11 minutes ago, Lucian Hodoboc said:

I don't really believe in drafts

 

Hey, @Lucian Hodoboc, I'm curious what you mean by this. 

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Posted (edited)

I mean that I don't usually like to use more than one or two drafts for my writings. The second or third draft is usually my final one. I don't like the approach that involves writing a certain number of words per day, regardless if it's quality writing or not, and then revising it several times after the entire work is finished.

Edited by Lucian Hodoboc
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41 minutes ago, Lucian Hodoboc said:

I mean that I don't usually like to use more than one or two drafts for my writings. The second or third draft is usually my final one.


Ah, gotcha. Agreed.

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3 hours ago, paulchernoch said:

For Fiction, this should come first.

 

For my personal writing method, reading other fiction is important, but never while I'm writing. I've found that if I'm in the middle of reading a good book while writing, my writing style will start to resemble the author I'm reading. I did that once, and had to rewrite a chapter or two because my writers voice had noticeably changed.

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28 minutes ago, Accord64 said:

 

because my writers voice had noticeably changed.

You could have passed it off as experimental writing. They do that in Postmodernism. 😅

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On 4/15/2019 at 11:35 AM, Lucian Hodoboc said:

I mean that I don't usually like to use more than one or two drafts for my writings. The second or third draft is usually my final one.

Yeah, me too!  Any more than two or three just starts wearing me down :)

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