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Nicholas Reicher

Bible Factoid - the Sovereignty of God

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On 4/11/2019 at 4:58 PM, Bob Leone said:

I heard a good illustration of Freewill vs. Predestination:

 

Imagine there is an arch way. You are on one side and written on the arch it says "Whosoever will may enter"

So you use your freewill and enter through the arch. Once on the other side you turn around and on the arch it says: "Chosen before the foundation of the world" 

 

Both statements are true. I guess we will find out more when we get to heaven.

that's actually pretty good!

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3 hours ago, Anon Reel said:

In order to obtain a concise definition of free-will, one must understand it's mechanics and component parts. Upon examination one realizes a clear definition will remain elusive, hence the difficulties and conjecture in moving forward.

 

Many speak right in accordance with scripture, Deuteronomy 29:29. One may attempt to go as far as one can, however, our finite capabilities render us incapable of apprehending truth and understanding. The inscrutable wisdom and inimitable grace of our Holy Father is that in which we marvel.

I think we can know doctrine, because the Bible 1). warns us to keep ours without spot and 2). orders us to separate from those who have wrong doctrine.

We can't separate from those with wrong doctrine if we can't determine from the Bible exactly what it is.

 

We do have finite understanding, but the Bible was written in the language of men,  so that we could understand.

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1 hour ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

shi gata ga nai, neh?

 

"It is a privilege for" is as far as I got in the translator! ;)

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Closest translation is not a literal meaning. It means, "So what can you do?" It can't be helped is a pretty literal meaning.

I like to say it's Japanese for "nu?"

  • Haha 1

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6 minutes ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

Closest translation is not a literal meaning. It means, "So what can you do?" It can't be helped is a pretty literal meaning.

 

I guess it sort of like a Japanese folk saying or proverb. Everyone (Japanese) knows what it is suppose to mean, and not the literal meaning. Like in Spanish, for you're welcome, they say de nada, literally it means of nothing.

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Exactly. It used to be "Karma- shigata ga nai, neh?" but I'm not Buddhist, and I've always left the Karma part out. Japanese culture has caught up with me. They dropped the Karma part as well. So now it's just shigata ga nai, neh?

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Another word used in Japan is.... Osu. It has no meaning. It's mainly used by Karate practitioners to mean "true spirit." They often greet each other that way. "Osu!" Watch a nidan geri that scores a point... "osu!"

Like that.

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So weird. The first time I put in Google's translator, it gave the answer I mentioned above. But it also said instead of Japanese, it was Hausa. I put it through again and it said Hausa with this: is it worth the nai, neh? o_O

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2 Peter 3:9

The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is long-suffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

 

If God does not wish that any should perish, I would imagine his 'predestination' would include every soul, and not just a chosen few. Just a thought...  Maureen Dobbins

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The arch illustration sums up my  study of the matter, unfinished as it is. The ultimate sovereignty of God in all things mundane and heavenly and an active choice  on the part of an individual to walk according to His perfect will coexist without contradiction.

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As requested, here's Baptist Soteriology

 

Traditional Baptist Soteriology is not Calvinist nor Arminian - but actually seems to sit in the very middle. To boil it down into as few words as possible, we are predestined by foreknowledge. God knows who will accept His gospel, and always has. God calls EVERYONE to repentance, and wishes none to perish. However, by His very nature He is God. He thus has omniscience and knows everything, including who will accept the Gospel and those who won't. The number who won't far outnumber those who will.

For God so loved the WORLD that He gave His only begotten Son that Whosoever shall believe upon Him should not perish but have everlasting life.

"Whosoever" means "Anyone." If you truly accept Jesus Christ as your Lord, then you are saved.

This is the traditional Baptist soteriology. It accepts both predestination and free will.

An important part of distinctive Baptist theology is the doctrine of once saved always saved. Since it's not your salvation to lose, then you can't lose it. You didn't get saved by your own works, so it's not possible to LOSE your salvation by your works.

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As requested, Arminian Soteriology.

 

Arminian soteriology - named after theologian Jacob Arminius - seems similar to Baptist theology but omits any Predestination aspects to it. They define their beliefs this way.
1). partial depravity - We are destined to Hell without Christ's grace, fallen in sin. However, we can still choose God and come to salvation.
2). Conditional Election - Just as Baptists, Arminianists believe God only chooses those who He knows will choose Christ.
3). Unlimited Atonement. Christ died for everyone.
4). Resistable Grace - people can reject the Gospel, and die in their sins.
5). Conditional Salvation - Christians can potentially lose their salvation if they sin.

 

As you can see, there's a lot of similarities between the positions. Some Arminianists vary on their interpretation of the third point of Arminianism and believe that everyone will be saved. Others back off slightly, and claim everyone who seeks God in any religion at all - even Satanism - are saved.

 

Major groups of Arminianists include Methodists, Assemblies of God and Charismatic Non-Denominational churches.

 

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Hopefully, I've kept this balanced and fair, without endorsing any one position or criticizing anyone. I did not name names and say who believes what position.

 

I've already picked up on a wide variety of beliefs on this issue on this board. If you feel I unfairly represented your beliefs, feel free to post any corrections.

 

As someone pointed out, I ask that you prayerfully research the differing views and decide for yourself. You should read as much as possible and let the Bible be your guide. The Bible is after all the sole authority of practice and faith for the Christian believer.

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