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Nicholas Reicher

The Nicholas Reicher Writing Academy

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I know everyone's got their $1000 writing academies or writers groups or writers bund or what have you...

and one person has a $500 writers platform academy...

I was thinking of one in a couple of years where you could join!

Here's the catch... 100 smackers up front OR

20 rejection letters due within 2 years of completion. 

That way I know you took what I teach and APPLY by getting rejected.

Or a copy of a literary agent's letter of acceptance could be tendered instead of rejection letters.

 

I'm not knocking anyone else's academies, but I can't afford $1000, and I bet most writers can't either. Writing mentoring should not be reserved for the wealthy. It should be for everyone. I'd rather give away what I know, but I've learned from my business guru that you have to charge something. So, a hundred dollars is due two years later or 20 rejection letters.

 

Feasible? Or far fetched?

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Wow. I may actually take you up on this if I ever get something written to the point that I get that many rejection letters.

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Oh, no - gotta be 20.

There's been a couple of famous authors who got up to 100. Frank Herbert got 23. Chicken Soup for the soul, over 140.  Stephen King got 30 rejections for his first novel. John Grisham 28.

One of the lessons is don't give up.

Never.

"Keep Fighting till the fighting's done!"

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32 minutes ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

Oh, no - gotta be 20.

That's going to be hard. Don't agents not send these out anymore? From what I hear, the sound of silence is the new rejection letter. 

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1 hour ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

I will so avoid jokes at this point.

Okay no more. Was to difficult not to.

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Interesting concept. I am inclined to agree with you, that 20 rejection letters prove that you tried over and over and ... times 20. That's a lot of effort. And that's what it takes.

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You caught my attention. So it would seem that your idea would work.

 

Obviously, there are the logistics you'll have to think through - stuff like how will you insure that you get 100 bucks if your students don't present proof of trying or their 20 rejection slips? But don't let all the hows and whys bog you down right now - you're testing the water with your idea. When you're ready, find your way around the obstacles. 

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Maybe I would do a payment install program, and all the money returned if the student completes the assignments?

I'm really not sure how to do this. I'm so tired of seeing programs for the wealthy, and struggling writers left out.

I also know that what Michael Hyatt has taught me is if I give it away, people aren't invested in it. If you attend in person, it cost you in time and effort, so it succeeds. If you attend online, you have to pay for it to want to do it.

 

My quandary is I know what I think of the people charging hundreds of dollars. I don't want people to think the same of me.

 

So... how do I do this? Price it so people take it seriously, but low enough that they won't think I'm trying to make myself rich off their misfortune? How can I give it away if people do all the steps the way I ask?

Money back would be near impossible.

Not charging unless they wimp out would be impossible.

 

Open to ideas.

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12 hours ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

I also know that what Michael Hyatt has taught me is if I give it away, people aren't invested in it.

This is true. We are good family friends with a swimming coach, who gave my mum and myself the following advice when we started our own businesses - make them pay something, even if it is as small as 5 bucks a lesson. 

 

Installment options could work, and could work well. For myself, I won't be able to afford 100 bucks at once, but installments of 25 is far more manageable. I'm not saying go as low as that, just sharing what works for me. 

 

You could have a small fee that they pay, regardless of whether they succeed or not. Something that enrolls them in the course. Then, they could pay the rest if they don't "pass"? This way, you would have something for the time and effort that you put into the mentor-ship. It could also help cover this problem:

 

12 hours ago, Nicholas Reicher said:

Price it so people take it seriously, but low enough that they won't think I'm trying to make myself rich off their misfortune?

Putting a cover fee would make people sit up and listen. Put a fee to be paid if 20 rejection letters aren't produced would give incentive. But then you have the problem of getting the money out of those who don't produce 20 rejection slips.

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I can't see anyone producing 20 rejection slips, Claire. Granted, I only had two before I had my first work published, and none after that, but still, I can't seen anyone coming up with 20.  Maybe it's just me, but...

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I like the idea of a "registration fee." That tells people that what you are offering is worth something.

 

Installment payments could be based on the lessons they complete. Then, when they produce the ?? number of rejection slips, you could refund their money.

 

I don't know that there is any magic number of rejection slips, but if books are published after just a few rejections, then they learned what you taught and they are successful. The purpose of your refund is to help those who really tried and didn't succeed.

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Not sure what to say, except that I agree with the non refundable cover charge, however small that might be.

 

Your going to have some material costs, you can't do this at a loss. Break even because you want to help, sure but unless you're stinking rich you can't do a total loss.

 

The student needs to be vested in completing the class in the first place. (I paid for this, I  better finish it). And then if I get xx rejection letters I get xx refund on the total class cost.

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