Jump to content

Do Authors Really Need To Blog?


EBraten

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 142
  • Created
  • Last Reply
41 minutes ago, Jethro said:

Which is very attractive in the short-term, but still (in the vast majority of cases) yields tiny sales quantities. I'm more interested in the long view, to make a career of it.

The vast majority of self-published books were never meant to make a profit.  The author wrote them to hold a book they wrote, and maybe some for the family.  They leave them on Amazon because it would be really cool to sell a few books.  Only 10 to 15 % of self-published authors actually try to make a go of it, but the numbers are skewed by the others.  

 

All that said, I was not talking badly about traditionally published books.  I think they can be great.  I only meant that to make a career of this, a writer must be in it for the long haul no matter how they publish.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jethro said:

All of your bookstores have been blown away?

All of our Christian bookstores started selling these kinds of books, (from questionable publishing houses) and no one would take their money there, so the bookstores went out of business.  The closest bookstore to me is over 100 miles away, and the closest Christain bookstore is in the next state!  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, lynnmosher said:

Actually, Alley, the symbol for Twitter is a bird and that's why it's called Twitter and tweet. :D

I know, but I still picture little songbirds in my yard when I hear tweeting.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/9/2018 at 10:17 AM, Nicholas Reicher said:

Yes, Authors need to blog and tweet.

I'm doomed! I can barely manage Facebook. To think that I have to implement other social media such as Twitter or Instagram or - you name it, sends shivers down my spine. I am not a social media bug - I hate it.

 

I am doing good just trying to get my website up and running (which does include a blog - more than one actually).  I don't know how I'm suppose to write a book, maintain a website and blog, keep several social media sites up to date, work at my day job - all to build a platform. I feel like I'm losing before I even begin!  ?

 

Sorry for the negativity. I am really trying to fight the "give up" mentality right now - and not just on my writing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a lot related to writing that is not writing. And building your base of followers is at the top of the list. If you do not have followers, who will read what you write? Let me ask you something. How do you make friends? Do you go to any Bible studies? To church? Any craft groups or other groups? Have you made friends? 

 

This is exactly what the groups like FB and Twitter are on social media: outlets for connecting, for making friends, relationships. That's where you talk about your family or not. Share recipes if you like. Ask questions to get others involved. Yesterday n FB, I asked what everyone's favorite Christmas cookie was. When you have a blog post, you post that. You share things you've seen.

 

I'm an introvert but I've learned how to come out of my shell, albeit somewhat. ^_^ So, don't give up, RL. And besides, no one ever said you had to join multiple social media sites. If one is your limit, then that's what works for you. Keep at it. You can do it! :D

 

PS Let me clarify. By groups, I meant like FB. However, there are tons of groups on FB that are well worth joining. There are Christian writing groups, prayer groups, women's groups, etc. Great places to get connected.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, RLHicks said:

I'm doomed! I can barely manage Facebook. To think that I have to implement other social media such as Twitter or Instagram or - you name it, sends shivers down my spine. I am not a social media bug - I hate it.

When I first began to pursue the steps that would lead me to  getting published, one thing I did read was the statements of several major publishers. Those that said "We will not sign an author who does not have an established social media platform" were by far the majority.

 

Publishing a book costs a lot of money. It's time consuming. New authors are not trusted simply because if they throw $X at your book, the worry is "will I make that back?"

 

If you have a following of over 100 people on Twitter, it says you have a promoting mindset, and the publisher thinks, "I can work with them." You're more likely to see your business relationship as a partnership. You're more likely to go to writing conventions, ask to speak, go to book signings and talk about your book and why it's so great, and blather blather blather about it on Twitter.

 

It's not comfortable. I don't like social media, but I've learned to use engines like Hootsuite to get my tweets programmed and out there. And I've got over 130 followers on Twitter, but let me tell you they're fickle, and you go through long periods of time of your count staying the same, but you've got six new followers.

 

If someone doesn't agree with your writing advice, they unfollow you in a heartbeat! No matter how right you are. I've had people unfollow because I posted a tweet at 5:45 and another at 6:15.

 

you want to get started on social media now, and learn to use Hootsuite free. It takes a while to build a following. I've been on for 14 months, and I'm only at the 136 mark or so.

 

Use Evernote web clipper to clip a lot of articles on a writer's platform. you'll make some mistakes, but get started now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was pleasantly surprised by the reaction to my research into arms and armor in both ancient and speculative situations. That and cutting-edge science for lay people is the subject of my blog.

 

Also I contribute to Quora ( a question/answer site) on subjects like working in retail, grammar, bicycle commuting, and New England living. It's easy to get lost there for hours on end.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
On 11/1/2018 at 8:37 AM, lynnmosher said:

However, fictionists do need a website. Readers are curious about the authors they read and want to find them online. And you need a newsletter to stay in touch with your readers.

I agree with you. When I read something that truly interests me I often Google for information about the author.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Steven Hutson
On 12/8/2018 at 10:15 PM, Alley said:

Only 10 to 15 % of self-published authors actually try to make a go of it


Intrigued. Got a source for this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.